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Journal
Challenge for Writers II
WElcome to the II Challenge for writers
"My traveler and his eagle... discovering other worlds"





Rules
 I want you to write about what the scene evokes to you. 
It must be a short story or thoughts . 
Please include "From other world ~ challenge for Writers II link/thumb" in your description.

Where to enter

Join our group :iconartistic-potential:
                                       
                 and                 Post Below  
Submit your story  
:iconEllysiumn:Ellysiumn
:iconellysiumn:Ellysiumn 34 46
Journal
Space is Love

I am extraordinarily blessed to do what I love for a living. Somehow in the last decade I’ve turned a hobby into a profession and then into a lifestyle. While I don’t claim any profound wisdom nor that my path is the best one, I thought that some aspiring artists out there might be encouraged to see the road that someone else has taken.

:iconMacRebisz-Art:MacRebisz-Art
:iconmacrebisz-art:MacRebisz-Art 1 0
Journal
Creative living: Interview #1

Our new collection of articles is a deep dive into the relationship between humans and machines. To capture the mood, we asked Jenny Yu, one of our favorite illustrators, to create original artwork.

Jenny first fell in love with art through the animation and games she adored as a kid, especially Miyazaki’s film, “Spirited Away.” “I was so touched, not only by the story but by the sheer artistry of the film. It was so beautiful, and to think that all these artists could make something so meaningful.”

We checked in with Jenny to find out about what inspires her today, her creative process, and the thoughts behind her pieces for our Human and Machine collection.

Hi Jenny! Where did you find inspiration while you were creating art for the Human and Machine collection?

I really had to educate myself prior to tackling these illustrations, as AI was still a completely nebulous concept to me. I began to realize technology can be infused in our everyday lives, almost unnoticeable as a physical presence. Most of the images I created are scenes from our surroundings in nature and life, with touches of technology. I looked to Spike Jonze’s film “Her,” which showed how AI can be an embellishment in our future daily lives rather than something that overtakes it.

Tell us about your process and the tools you use.

My process is pretty straightforward and simple. I love looking at different reference materials first — I’m particularly fond of photography, film, and traditional oil painting for inspiration. I love loosely thumb-nailing in my sketchbook with pen or pencil, just trying to figure out a general composition without focusing too much on detail. Later, I take that idea to Photoshop and start with a simple, loose sketch. From there, I block in values and colors and add in adjustment layers and details.

How would you sum up your approach to illustration?

It might sound corny, but I always try to start with a feeling. The imagery that comes with it usually comes simultaneously, but I think illustrations are a way to capture a single moment and feeling that can be particularly intense.

Sometimes I see the way light hits a certain material and I think, “Wow, that’s so incredibly beautiful. I hope I can show someone else how beautiful and wondrous this feels to me.

What do you hope people experience as they view your work? Are there certain elements they should keep an eye out for?

I want to convey magic in the minutiae of everyday life amongst the experience of growing up and changing. I want to be able to capture the ephemera of day-to-day moments — what it’s like to watch light scrambling through the curtains on a Sunday morning, or the world flittering by through the window of a train, or to be in the midst of a bustling crowd. It’s in these idle, solitary moments I sometimes feel most human and contemplative, and I think those are the feelings I’m trying my best to depict.

My personal disposition tends to skew melancholic and nostalgic, and art is a means of comfort for me to remind me of memories and emotions I thought I’ve lost, and to remind me of my gratitude for life when things become disheartening or difficult. I hope I can comfort others too — that’s all I can wish for.

Which is your favorite piece from this collection? Why?

My favorite piece is the one about using AI in photography. I think with this piece I was able to really balance the idea of AI existing in our everyday lifestyles while also showing it in action, aiding our work and creativity. I think it was a good combination of both abstract concept and artistic execution. The idea, composition, and mood also came very spontaneously, and I was excited to draw it out very quickly. I love when that happens!

As an artist, how do you feel about advancements in AI? Do you think they could support your work in the future?

I’m a bit of an idealist, so I feel positively about the developments of AI. I think AI can help us expand and grow as artists. What if it was able to make suggestions about composition, color, lighting and perspective, or make artistic observations we haven’t quite noticed before? In this way, we evolve alongside the machine. When AI learns, we also learn.

What advice would you give to other artists and designers?

Know what’s important to you, and always keep creating. Learn to keep falling in love with your craft over and over again, and never get formulaic. Prioritize impact and feeling over technique (although technique is also important). Keep practicing. Keep failing. Remember to take care of yourself and others, and how you make your work will eventually fall into place.

:iconMacRebisz-Art:MacRebisz-Art
:iconmacrebisz-art:MacRebisz-Art 1 0
Journal
My Interview With planetrix from DA

Who are you? Tell us a little about yourself.

My name is Maciej Rebisz (Mac for short). I’m a concept artist and illustrator, working for games and film industry. I'm currently employed at CG animation and cinematics studio called Platige Image in Warsaw, Poland. In my spare time (unfortunately there's not that much of it) I run a personal project called Space That Never Was, where I do series of illustrations depicting space exploration in the past, in the alternative history and the future.

Why space art?

I was in love with space since I can remember. I've always been fascinated by it, the idea of going out there, visiting other worlds, seeing places that no living thing has seen before, exploring the unknown - for me, all of that was always truly magical. When I have started doing more serious art in my teens, it was all natural for me to go with space themes.

What space-related fact or phenomena is most fascinating to you at the moment?

There is a lot happening in space exploration right now. Rise of the private space sector, plans of return to the Moon, and crewed Mars missions. Also recent developments in astrophysics and astronomy - gravitational waves astronomy, hunting exoplanets. All of these achievements are very inspiring and fascinating for me.

Digital or Traditional?

Digital, mostly. I do sometime use traditional media, but usually it's loose sketching to capture an idea, before moving to digital media for the final piece.

Would you mind telling us what kinds of tools you use, how you use them and your thoughts on them overall? (Software, brushes, whatever)?

I use Photoshop for digital painting, and Modo for 3D design of spacecrafts and setting up scenes. Sometimes I use space related applications like Space Engine or NASA's Eyes on the Solar System, where I can check if my ideas are feasible, like certain points of view on and around celestial bodies or lighting configurations. As for hardware, I work on Windows PC, with Wacom Cintiq 27QHD graphic display tablet. I've also recently picked up an iPad Pro with Apple Pencil for sketching on the go, and it's surprisingly good even for doing detailed final work.

📷

One thing I love about your work is your depiction of near-future tech, and your focus on individual people or machines. What are your major sources of inspiration here?

It's difficult to pinpoint a single source of inspiration, for me it has always been a great mix of various influences - movies, books, games, artists, even scientific articles and documenteries. I also admire many classic science fiction illustrators from 70s and 80s - Chris Foss, John Harris, John Berkey, Ralph McQuarrie, just to name a few. I also take tons of inspirations from many nameless NASA illustrators that did all these beautiful technical and concept artworks from the mid 20th century Space Race era.

Walk us through your process, from concept to finished piece (If it helps, pick a single piece to talk about)

My process varies quite a bit, depending on the result I want to achieve. Nowadays I make art in two styles - one is a bit stylized, more painterly and the other is photorealistic, almost like faking photos, including all the imperfections and limitations of photographic media.Both approaches usually start with a 3D model of a spacecraft, to get the design and functionality right from the very beginning.For the painterly style I don't make very detailed models, I just use them as a general form guide. I paint over rough 3D models in Photoshop, adding light, textures, details. With this style, I do not use any phototextures or photobashing, rarely even any layer blending modes beside "Normal", it's a great fun for me to do all that by hand with just two types of brush - hard textured brush (for painting) and soft large brush (for erasing).For photorealistic pieces, I render highly detailed 3D models and then I use a mix of different filters, touch ups, some overpainting here and there, phototexturing, etc. I also try to find some real world reference photos, to see what details I need to replicate to achieve that photorealistic feel.

Any upcoming projects you are excited about?

Beside more or less regular artworks that I do for Space That Never Was, I'm also working on a few large projects - live action short film set in alternative history and two game projects about space exploration. There are also two other cool projects that I was involved in, waiting for publication (one with NASA and Arizona State University). If you want to know more, follow me here on deviantART or on my project's tumblr blog - Space That Never Was, I will definitely post there any updates on these projects.

What is the hardest part about what you do? (the gotchas)

As with all artworks for all artists - it is getting the right composition, colors, mood, etc. to believably convey the idea behind the piece. Sometimes doing research about the real world spacecrafts can be a bit challenging as well, finding the right reference, schematics, technical papers, somewhere on long forgotten NASA archive websites or even in old forgotten books.

What is the best, or most enjoyable, part about making space art?

For me, every step of the process is very enjoyable, it's really difficult to pick one. I love the initial excitement of doing research and designing the scene and vehicles, then there's joy and relaxation that comes from painting and after the piece is finished, putting the artwork on the internet, seeing followers' reactions, reading the comments, etc., it gives me pleasant adrenaline rush. So, as I've said - I love all the parts of the process.

In what areas are you still trying to improve?

I think that in art there's always something to improve on, in my case I'm constantly trying to improve my visual storytelling, to capture the story in the image and tell it as interestingly as possible.

Any tips for new space artists?

Use tutorials only to get you started or learn a certain technique, but never stop experimenting, don't get caught in processes learned from these tutorials, stray off the path and try new things and you will have a lot more fun and will develop your own unique styles.

Have you done any tutorials, on site or off? (Links, please!)

I did a few simple tutorials on dA a long time ago, but I think they're not that good anymore, so I can't I recommend them with a clear conscience. I plan to start a Patreon campaign sometime early 2019, where I will offer process videos and more behind the scenes content, as a rewards for my supporters.

Which of your works are you most proud of?

Usually I'm most proud of my most recent artworks, so right now it's my most recent series, showing Sunrise 2 mission to Mars. But I like it less and less with each day and that's what pushes me forward to make more art that I can be proud of in the future.

What, in your opinion, is your most underrated piece of artwork?

I don't think I have anything in my gallery that's really underrated. If there is something like that, then there's a reason. I try to learn something new from each artwork I make, so when a piece doesn't get that much attention, I try to analyze what went wrong and learn from it.

Never stop dreaming big and aim high.

Which other space artists inspire you?

As mentioned earlier, there are too many to name. They're mostly classic science fiction illustrators of the past century and countless artists working for space agencies in the Space Race era.

Any last words?

Never stop dreaming big and aim high.

Designing 3D models of space craft sounds awesome! How do you manage to make them look so real? Where do you even start?

To make a realistic design, I need to ask myself some important questions first. What's the function of the spacecraft? What is it used for? I'm a great proponent of "form follows function" rule. Vehicle has to fulfill its role first, before we can get to aesthetics. Knowing technology of real world spacecrafts, spaceflight physics, and going through tons of reference, really helps getting the functional part of the design. Once I have that, the rest is just cosmetics. It's very similar to industrial design process, but of course in art I can bend some rules here and there to get a better artistic result. I have also finished a few courses of spacecraft  and space mission design, and orbital mechanics, that definitely helps me to achieve more believable designs.




:iconMacRebisz-Art:MacRebisz-Art
:iconmacrebisz-art:MacRebisz-Art 2 0
White Wolf Galaxy by FleetingEmber White Wolf Galaxy :iconfleetingember:FleetingEmber 1,701 51 Zebra by FleetingEmber Zebra :iconfleetingember:FleetingEmber 1,163 44 the Omen by Aenami the Omen :iconaenami:Aenami 727 12
Journal
Featured on The Phoblographer!
Hey guys! Recently my rooftop photos have been featured on The Phoblographer.
You can also read an interview with me and enjoy the photos! Check it out here.
:iconburningmonk:burningmonk
:iconburningmonk:burningmonk 7 35
Elfquest v1.0 WIP by uncannyknack Elfquest v1.0 WIP :iconuncannyknack:uncannyknack 161 13 Behind and behind by m883 Behind and behind :iconm883:m883 12 4 DD Guidelines by Ellysiumn DD Guidelines :iconellysiumn:Ellysiumn 37 0 Looking down by sanfranguy Looking down :iconsanfranguy:sanfranguy 128 9 Dragon noir by Arceoroise Dragon noir :iconarceoroise:Arceoroise 94 11 X-wing by Blik1976 X-wing :iconblik1976:Blik1976 568 63 The magic of ice by woxys The magic of ice :iconwoxys:woxys 856 46

Activity


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Behind and behind

6 deviations
Creative living: Interview #1

Our new collection of articles is a deep dive into the relationship between humans and machines. To capture the mood, we asked Jenny Yu, one of our favorite illustrators, to create original artwork.

Jenny first fell in love with art through the animation and games she adored as a kid, especially Miyazaki’s film, “Spirited Away.” “I was so touched, not only by the story but by the sheer artistry of the film. It was so beautiful, and to think that all these artists could make something so meaningful.”

We checked in with Jenny to find out about what inspires her today, her creative process, and the thoughts behind her pieces for our Human and Machine collection.

Hi Jenny! Where did you find inspiration while you were creating art for the Human and Machine collection?

I really had to educate myself prior to tackling these illustrations, as AI was still a completely nebulous concept to me. I began to realize technology can be infused in our everyday lives, almost unnoticeable as a physical presence. Most of the images I created are scenes from our surroundings in nature and life, with touches of technology. I looked to Spike Jonze’s film “Her,” which showed how AI can be an embellishment in our future daily lives rather than something that overtakes it.

Tell us about your process and the tools you use.

My process is pretty straightforward and simple. I love looking at different reference materials first — I’m particularly fond of photography, film, and traditional oil painting for inspiration. I love loosely thumb-nailing in my sketchbook with pen or pencil, just trying to figure out a general composition without focusing too much on detail. Later, I take that idea to Photoshop and start with a simple, loose sketch. From there, I block in values and colors and add in adjustment layers and details.

How would you sum up your approach to illustration?

It might sound corny, but I always try to start with a feeling. The imagery that comes with it usually comes simultaneously, but I think illustrations are a way to capture a single moment and feeling that can be particularly intense.

Sometimes I see the way light hits a certain material and I think, “Wow, that’s so incredibly beautiful. I hope I can show someone else how beautiful and wondrous this feels to me.

What do you hope people experience as they view your work? Are there certain elements they should keep an eye out for?

I want to convey magic in the minutiae of everyday life amongst the experience of growing up and changing. I want to be able to capture the ephemera of day-to-day moments — what it’s like to watch light scrambling through the curtains on a Sunday morning, or the world flittering by through the window of a train, or to be in the midst of a bustling crowd. It’s in these idle, solitary moments I sometimes feel most human and contemplative, and I think those are the feelings I’m trying my best to depict.

My personal disposition tends to skew melancholic and nostalgic, and art is a means of comfort for me to remind me of memories and emotions I thought I’ve lost, and to remind me of my gratitude for life when things become disheartening or difficult. I hope I can comfort others too — that’s all I can wish for.

Which is your favorite piece from this collection? Why?

My favorite piece is the one about using AI in photography. I think with this piece I was able to really balance the idea of AI existing in our everyday lifestyles while also showing it in action, aiding our work and creativity. I think it was a good combination of both abstract concept and artistic execution. The idea, composition, and mood also came very spontaneously, and I was excited to draw it out very quickly. I love when that happens!

As an artist, how do you feel about advancements in AI? Do you think they could support your work in the future?

I’m a bit of an idealist, so I feel positively about the developments of AI. I think AI can help us expand and grow as artists. What if it was able to make suggestions about composition, color, lighting and perspective, or make artistic observations we haven’t quite noticed before? In this way, we evolve alongside the machine. When AI learns, we also learn.

What advice would you give to other artists and designers?

Know what’s important to you, and always keep creating. Learn to keep falling in love with your craft over and over again, and never get formulaic. Prioritize impact and feeling over technique (although technique is also important). Keep practicing. Keep failing. Remember to take care of yourself and others, and how you make your work will eventually fall into place.

My Interview With planetrix from DA

Who are you? Tell us a little about yourself.

My name is Maciej Rebisz (Mac for short). I’m a concept artist and illustrator, working for games and film industry. I'm currently employed at CG animation and cinematics studio called Platige Image in Warsaw, Poland. In my spare time (unfortunately there's not that much of it) I run a personal project called Space That Never Was, where I do series of illustrations depicting space exploration in the past, in the alternative history and the future.

Why space art?

I was in love with space since I can remember. I've always been fascinated by it, the idea of going out there, visiting other worlds, seeing places that no living thing has seen before, exploring the unknown - for me, all of that was always truly magical. When I have started doing more serious art in my teens, it was all natural for me to go with space themes.

What space-related fact or phenomena is most fascinating to you at the moment?

There is a lot happening in space exploration right now. Rise of the private space sector, plans of return to the Moon, and crewed Mars missions. Also recent developments in astrophysics and astronomy - gravitational waves astronomy, hunting exoplanets. All of these achievements are very inspiring and fascinating for me.

Digital or Traditional?

Digital, mostly. I do sometime use traditional media, but usually it's loose sketching to capture an idea, before moving to digital media for the final piece.

Would you mind telling us what kinds of tools you use, how you use them and your thoughts on them overall? (Software, brushes, whatever)?

I use Photoshop for digital painting, and Modo for 3D design of spacecrafts and setting up scenes. Sometimes I use space related applications like Space Engine or NASA's Eyes on the Solar System, where I can check if my ideas are feasible, like certain points of view on and around celestial bodies or lighting configurations. As for hardware, I work on Windows PC, with Wacom Cintiq 27QHD graphic display tablet. I've also recently picked up an iPad Pro with Apple Pencil for sketching on the go, and it's surprisingly good even for doing detailed final work.

📷

One thing I love about your work is your depiction of near-future tech, and your focus on individual people or machines. What are your major sources of inspiration here?

It's difficult to pinpoint a single source of inspiration, for me it has always been a great mix of various influences - movies, books, games, artists, even scientific articles and documenteries. I also admire many classic science fiction illustrators from 70s and 80s - Chris Foss, John Harris, John Berkey, Ralph McQuarrie, just to name a few. I also take tons of inspirations from many nameless NASA illustrators that did all these beautiful technical and concept artworks from the mid 20th century Space Race era.

Walk us through your process, from concept to finished piece (If it helps, pick a single piece to talk about)

My process varies quite a bit, depending on the result I want to achieve. Nowadays I make art in two styles - one is a bit stylized, more painterly and the other is photorealistic, almost like faking photos, including all the imperfections and limitations of photographic media.Both approaches usually start with a 3D model of a spacecraft, to get the design and functionality right from the very beginning.For the painterly style I don't make very detailed models, I just use them as a general form guide. I paint over rough 3D models in Photoshop, adding light, textures, details. With this style, I do not use any phototextures or photobashing, rarely even any layer blending modes beside "Normal", it's a great fun for me to do all that by hand with just two types of brush - hard textured brush (for painting) and soft large brush (for erasing).For photorealistic pieces, I render highly detailed 3D models and then I use a mix of different filters, touch ups, some overpainting here and there, phototexturing, etc. I also try to find some real world reference photos, to see what details I need to replicate to achieve that photorealistic feel.

Any upcoming projects you are excited about?

Beside more or less regular artworks that I do for Space That Never Was, I'm also working on a few large projects - live action short film set in alternative history and two game projects about space exploration. There are also two other cool projects that I was involved in, waiting for publication (one with NASA and Arizona State University). If you want to know more, follow me here on deviantART or on my project's tumblr blog - Space That Never Was, I will definitely post there any updates on these projects.

What is the hardest part about what you do? (the gotchas)

As with all artworks for all artists - it is getting the right composition, colors, mood, etc. to believably convey the idea behind the piece. Sometimes doing research about the real world spacecrafts can be a bit challenging as well, finding the right reference, schematics, technical papers, somewhere on long forgotten NASA archive websites or even in old forgotten books.

What is the best, or most enjoyable, part about making space art?

For me, every step of the process is very enjoyable, it's really difficult to pick one. I love the initial excitement of doing research and designing the scene and vehicles, then there's joy and relaxation that comes from painting and after the piece is finished, putting the artwork on the internet, seeing followers' reactions, reading the comments, etc., it gives me pleasant adrenaline rush. So, as I've said - I love all the parts of the process.

In what areas are you still trying to improve?

I think that in art there's always something to improve on, in my case I'm constantly trying to improve my visual storytelling, to capture the story in the image and tell it as interestingly as possible.

Any tips for new space artists?

Use tutorials only to get you started or learn a certain technique, but never stop experimenting, don't get caught in processes learned from these tutorials, stray off the path and try new things and you will have a lot more fun and will develop your own unique styles.

Have you done any tutorials, on site or off? (Links, please!)

I did a few simple tutorials on dA a long time ago, but I think they're not that good anymore, so I can't I recommend them with a clear conscience. I plan to start a Patreon campaign sometime early 2019, where I will offer process videos and more behind the scenes content, as a rewards for my supporters.

Which of your works are you most proud of?

Usually I'm most proud of my most recent artworks, so right now it's my most recent series, showing Sunrise 2 mission to Mars. But I like it less and less with each day and that's what pushes me forward to make more art that I can be proud of in the future.

What, in your opinion, is your most underrated piece of artwork?

I don't think I have anything in my gallery that's really underrated. If there is something like that, then there's a reason. I try to learn something new from each artwork I make, so when a piece doesn't get that much attention, I try to analyze what went wrong and learn from it.

Never stop dreaming big and aim high.

Which other space artists inspire you?

As mentioned earlier, there are too many to name. They're mostly classic science fiction illustrators of the past century and countless artists working for space agencies in the Space Race era.

Any last words?

Never stop dreaming big and aim high.

Designing 3D models of space craft sounds awesome! How do you manage to make them look so real? Where do you even start?

To make a realistic design, I need to ask myself some important questions first. What's the function of the spacecraft? What is it used for? I'm a great proponent of "form follows function" rule. Vehicle has to fulfill its role first, before we can get to aesthetics. Knowing technology of real world spacecrafts, spaceflight physics, and going through tons of reference, really helps getting the functional part of the design. Once I have that, the rest is just cosmetics. It's very similar to industrial design process, but of course in art I can bend some rules here and there to get a better artistic result. I have also finished a few courses of spacecraft  and space mission design, and orbital mechanics, that definitely helps me to achieve more believable designs.




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YBS99

Artist | Professional | Design & Interfaces
Israel

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Add a Comment:
 
:iconazzedar-san:
Azzedar-san Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2018
Thank you for the watch, I appreciate it :) 
Reply
:iconm883:
m883 Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2018
Thx a lot for kind words :)
Reply
:iconybs99:
YBS99 Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2018  Professional Interface Designer

cool

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:iconinnxcents:
innxcents Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2018  Student Interface Designer
Thank you ❤️
Continue the good work as a staff! ❤️
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:iconorange-1:
Orange-1 Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2018
Thanks for the fav!:-)
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:iconpajunen:
Pajunen Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2018
Thank you for the Watch!
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:iconsonamyfan362:
SonAmyFan362 Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2018  Professional Writer
Thanks for the Watch! I will try to give you something to look forward to!
Reply
:iconskippyjr:
SkippyJr Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2018  Hobbyist Filmographer
:wave::iconthxwatchbubbleplz:
Reply
:iconsonamyfan362:
SonAmyFan362 Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2017  Professional Writer
Hi! Congratulations on joining the DeviantART Staff!
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:iconybs99:
YBS99 Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2018  Professional Interface Designer
Hey SonAmyFan362 thank you 
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