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Group Info Group Founded 8 Years ago Statistics 539 Members
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Group Info

:note: Next WriMo: July 2014 - Camp NaNoWriMo
:heart: Host: Flaming-Spirit :handshake: Helpers: ?
See our Writing Projects list for known WriMo's seeking Group Hosts.
Anyone can host. Success requires action and practice makes perfect--volunteer.

We are a group of writers, bringing literary deviants together during a Writing Month (WriMo). The Group goal is to share motivation, resources, and WriMo happenings with all our devious writers. Interested? Get Involved. Everyone can--and should--contribute. :heart:
Group
Founded 8 Years ago
Oct 3, 2010

Location
Global

Group Focus
Writing Months

539 Members
440 Watchers
44,112 Pageviews
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Igraine of Dumnonia by InkyRose
Arthur's Britain by InkyRose
Kawena - Fallon Ref Sketch + Profile by BlackManaBurning
Kawena Protagonist - So-Rin Ref Sketch and Profile by BlackManaBurning
NaPoWriMo Week 1
NaPoWriMo Week 2
NaPoWriMo Week 3
NaPoWriMo Week 4

Random from Featured

Literature
The Narrative OC MEME
I. Choose up to five (5) of your favorite original story characters that will embark in this role-play. If you don't have five (5) then leave them blank (or create a character on the spot!) Be sure to give a little description of them:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
II. One of your characters decides to make a grand entrance into a random tavern. How does that go? Pick either Character One  or Character Four :
III. Jealous, Character Three tries to make a grand entrance as well but somehow fails… why is that?
IV. A character is surrounded by many enemies and decides that the only thing they can do is fight! How does that go? Pick either Character Two or Character Five
V. Character Three is depressed and decides to get drunk.
VI. An event like no other takes place and Character One and Character Two get into a battle to the death. Who wins?
VII. Character Four or Character Five accidentally drink a love potion. Who do they fall in love wit
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Literature
The Hard Work of Poetry
Poets are constantly crippled, creatively. It's the way it works. You write a line and, just now, right now, it seems like it's the best line in the world to date. It's a shiny, beautiful line, a thought, an image so remarkably profound that you are in awe of yourself, or (if you are a seasoned poet) in awe of that angelic being which sits on high in your mind and occasionally drops little scraps of poetic manna into your head. Now, you only need to write a poem around it.
And fail.
Because the poem takes over, sprouts a million legs and scurries in directions you had no real intention of it going – and now the Wondrous Line of Glory and Poetic Win doesn't fit. You have to either change it or take it out and save it for another poem. Or make it a haiku-like short poem on its own, so all those other words don't assault it again. If you're an experienced poet, you'll probably just store it in a .txt file or on a post-it note somewhere and lament it until you're old and nothing matte
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Literature
A Note on Writing Characters
My dearest, darling Author:
I enjoyed reading your book, I really did. But there were some things that simply got on my nerves.
Your need to tell me absolutely everything, as if every tiny detail were just so integral to the plot, was supremely annoying. I do not need to know a character's hair and eye color when I first meet them, or every detail down to the style of his buttons when he walks into a scene; I do not necessarily need to know what his lunch was or that he went bowling with the guys last Saturday and has been in the league for five years. Take for instance that scene on the veranda, where the one protagonist stepped up to the wall and got his first good look at the sea in years. You wasted paragraphs and paragraphs of words explaining how, when he was a boy and saw the ocean for the first time, it was terrifying to him, left him with a feeling of crushing loneliness. Now, if you had simply said he stepped up to the wall and saw the sea for the first time in years, and had
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Literature
Writing Tips - Organisation
Writing Without Confusing Yourself (Or Your Readers)
Writing is a very personal, individual undertaking. Everybody approaches the activity a bit differently from the next guy. Some people can come up with concept, plot, characters, and everything else and just sit down and write. Others need to take time to figure out what's going on; what's going to happen in the story, and how it all fits together. Others still will find themselves getting stuck somewhere along the middle, losing track of everything or changing an idea mid-way through, or never know how to end. These are the people for whom this has been put together. Those of you who can barrel through a story overnight are still welcome to look, though.
Intro:
There are different ways in which a writer can and will get stuck on any given piece. Motivation, immediate environment, too few (or too many) ideas available, lack of organisation; the list goes on, but life is short and I am lazy. The sticking point that we're going
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Literature
Writing Tips - Mechanics
Tips and Tricks for Writing Fluidly
Mechanics
No, we’re not fixing up your brother’s car. Mechanics are the little technical bits in your writing; punctuation, spacing, spelling, capitalisation, et cetera. We’ll start there.
Capitalisation
Different languages have different rules for what should be capitalised. If you speak English, you’d capitalise “I” and leave your dog lowercase. You may find it interesting that German is a bit backwards. If you’re German, you’d capitalise “Hund” and leave “ich” lowercase. Why am I telling you this? Because it’s simple little things like this that have the potential to give your reader the wrong impression of you. If they think that English is not your first language, they may structure a critique differently than if they knew that you were born and raised in New York.
So, when do you capitalise something?
° At the beginnings of sentences.
The dog is in the park.<
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Literature
Writing Tips - Grammar, pt 1
Part one: Parts of Speech
Now that you know how to use a comma and structure a quote, let’s really get our hands dirty! Because all those commas and quotes and hard stops don’t mean a thing if you have weak grammar. Grammar is huge. There’s a lot of it, so this will only be a blitz course, covering a lot in a small space. Hopefully, you already know most of it, though.
Parts of Speech
That’s right. We’re doing sentence diagramming in this lesson. You’re going to need to know the difference between an adjective and an adverb later on, so this seems the logical place to start.
A sentence needs three things to make it a sentence. It needs a subject, a verb, and it needs to be a complete thought.
The subject is usually, but not always, a noun, a proper noun, or a pronoun.
Nouns: Nouns are something physical. Look to your left. What do you see? That’s a noun.
° Please pass me that book.
Proper Nouns: Proper nouns are exactly what
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Literature
Writing Tips - Grammar, pt 2
Part two: Tense of the Narrative, and Plural and Singular Nouns
Tenses: No, we’re not talking about a hard day at work, but rather verb tenses. What, basically, is the time-direction of your narrative? Is the chronicler telling about something that has already happening, is happening, or will eventually happen?
In most works of fiction, the narrative is in “past tense.” It’s already happened. Occasionally, you’ll find a book in “present tense” – it’s happening now, as you’re reading it – and these are usually of the “pick your own adventure” sort. The ones where you don’t read about the knight in shining armour, but rather, you are the knight in shining armour and the choices you make determine whether you rescue the princess or if the evil wizard turns you into a newt. I’ve never seen a book written in “future tense” – it will happen, but it just hasn’t happened yet – but if you
:iconML-Larson:ML-Larson
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Literature
Research: How to do It
We’ve already discussed where to do your research, so now we’re going to learn how to go about using those tools. Like everything else we do in life, there’s a process to it, and once you’ve learned the steps, finding the information becomes a bit easier (admittedly, some of the harder queries will never get easier).
What do you Need to Know?
Knowing what it is that you’re trying to research seems sort of obvious, but there are times when you won’t have the first clue about what you’re looking for. These are mostly situations when you already have your story plotted out, and now you need fact to work around your outline.
The situation: A group of police characters is out in the sprawling farmlands of the West Country in the middle of the night. After a brief struggle, one of them is shot. The character that has done the shooting and his accomplice flee. The remaining uninjured character dials
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Literature
Writing Tips - Grammar, pt 3
Part three: Cases and Grammar Nazi Nit-Picks
Cases
Cases are, in a sort, ways of conjugating a noun – that is, defining its role in a sentence. Kind of. Not really. Well, sort of. It’s a bit swimmy, because we don’t really have them in the English language. Well, that’s a lie. We do, but they’re not very prominent. Despite this, we’re going over them anyway. Why? Because they’re big in some foreign languages and extinct languages. Why do we care? Because there will be a lesson on foreign and extinct languages in the future. But don’t worry; we will cross that bridge when we come to it. Those who couldn’t give a pair of fetid dingo’s kidneys about adding foreign languages into their stories can feel free to scroll down the page to the next bit, which is a good one, and talks about Grammar Nazis.
Nominative: Sometimes known as “subjective,” because it indicates the subject.
° I am tired.
° He
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Literature
Writing Tips - Language
Accents, Foreign Languages, and Regional Dialects
There are times when your story may have one or more character speaking a different language, or with a different accent than the rest. There are many different ways a writer can go about presenting this to the reader, and before we go any further, I will concede that some of it is a matter of personal taste, and on this particular matter, you won’t be able to please everybody. So, consider this bit not so much a lesson, but rather a series of guidelines.
Accents
Everyone has one. Even if you think that you don’t, there’s someone, somewhere in the world who would disagree with you. Some people may have a very faint trace of an accent, whereas with others, you can hardly make out what they’re trying to tell you. But how should you translate these simple speech patterns to text? Well, that depends, really.
Since I’ve been listening to the audio books lately, and it’s the best example I can come up with, let
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Literature
Writing Tips - Getting Started
You want to write a story. Great! But the problem is that you're stuck before you've ever even managed to get the first word down on the page. You're just being taunted by the white page (or screen, as the case may be) in front of you.
If you haven't already, you may want to look into getting your thoughts organised. Figure out what you're going to write about, before trying to write anything. This may mean anything from making a few notes on a page to writing down every single thing that pops into your head, whether or not it's immediately relevant (my preferred method). With a more general (or even a very concrete) idea of where your story is going to go, the words should hopefully come a little more easily.
If that fails to work, try putting on some music. I tend to find that just putting on any old music will actually be counter-productive. Instead, t
:iconML-Larson:ML-Larson
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Hello Deviant Writers! :wave:

This Group was created to give the deviantART Literature community a central place to find everything WriMo-related. If you don't know what a WriMo is, sit tight and continue reading, everything will be explained. :heart:

Every year there are Writing Month's (WriMo's) which ask writers from around the world to complete a literary piece within 30 days. This Group will always provide devious support for NaNoWriMo (held in November) and NaPoWriMo, possibly Script Frenzy (both held in April). That covers the basic prose, poetry and scripts. :nod:

If you would like to host a WriMo, please volunteer, no prior experience necessary--general instructions are in the Admin Area to help you. You can even make a WriMo up if you want to. :eyes: Our hope is to keep everyone writing and meeting like-minded deviants during lots and lots of WriMo challenges. :D

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Visit our About Us page for important Group Details
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Invalid Submissions and Disruptions will get you banned:
  • First Offense - Given a notice with a link to this section
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It is finally once again upon us! My how the times fly! WriMo-Writers wanted to wish everyone good luck, and remind you that the chat is open. #CampNaNoWriMo

Cheers!
Flaming-Spirit
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:iconwrittenbadly:
WrittenBadly Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Is this group dead? 
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:iconsarahmyriacarter:
SarahMyriaCarter Featured By Owner Sep 15, 2014  Professional Writer
My new book Seekers tribulation is out now

www.createspace.com/4998707
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:iconlabruyere:
LaBruyere Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2013  Hobbyist
So are you gonna have a folder for National Poetry Writing Month this year? :D
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:iconthe-red-tower:
The-Red-Tower Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for adding my piece to the gallery! And it's awesome to see a group of Wrimos on here!
Reply
:iconemaginette:
emaginette Featured By Owner Jul 23, 2012
Just saying hello. New to the site and still looking around. :-)
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