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Which special effect do you like/use the most in your watercolor art? 

39%
140 deviants said Table/sea salt
23%
81 deviants said Paper tissue
22%
78 deviants said Gell pen
7%
25 deviants said Other (please tell us about them)
3%
11 deviants said Texture medium
3%
10 deviants said Plastic/bubble wrap
3%
10 deviants said Rubbing alcohol

Devious Comments

:iconzompaws:
Zompaws Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Love using salt, and spraying water/another colour into the paint. But i use gel pen the most. Becasue im an impatient human.
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2016   Traditional Artist
Thank you for your comment :love:
The salt is something you can use almost too often. It's so easy to use and makes nice texture :giggle: When I need a certain extra in my artworks and don't want to bother with it too much...the salt is a great option. That's why I need to remind myself "no salt this time, you already used it 1000x times" I am a dummy! 
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:iconlamorghana:
lamorghana Featured By Owner Edited Sep 27, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I really like to paint with watercolors which after drying do details with pen ink
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 28, 2016   Traditional Artist
Thank you for sharing this Love 
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:iconquinnymeow:
Quinnymeow Featured By Owner Edited Sep 23, 2016  Student General Artist
I like to blot up color with coffee filters. :)
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2016   Traditional Artist
Thank you for the comment Hug 
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:iconvanityfair:
vanityfair Featured By Owner Edited Sep 23, 2016  Professional Traditional Artist
Masking tape and masking fluid.
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 23, 2016   Traditional Artist
Thank you for your comment :la:
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:iconvanityfair:
vanityfair Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2016  Professional Traditional Artist
You can do a lot with masking tape.
And you are very welcome.
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:iconcoccis:
Coccis Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Watercolour ground = pure :love:
It does give lovely 3D effect while you can still keep the colour transparent and now I'm actually able to paint on large canvas which is huge plus since I need fer larger pieces to my empty walls. 
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2016   Traditional Artist
Can you recommend any watercolor ground? Which one are you using now? Bear Emoji-37 (Wondering Question) [V2] 
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:iconcoccis:
Coccis Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
There is only one brand I can get my hands on (I thought I could get another brand from US or Canada, but nope. No shipping available.) and only one painting I have done so far but I've been using Schmincke Aqua primer, coarse. It gave really nice structured surface. I now have same brand but fine ground. I personally wanted heavily structured surface which the fine ground won't allow to do but I guess I'll try it on wooden block or canvas at some point. 
I probably use it too heavy handed anyway. :giggle:
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 23, 2016   Traditional Artist
Thank you for the info!
Wow, my shop has this too, I can't believe it I am a dummy!  But it's quite expensive :( (Sad) 
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:iconcoccis:
Coccis Featured By Owner Sep 23, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
With the fine one only a thin layer should do so basically you should be able to do multiple canvasses etc. with it. 
So it's not that expensive compared to good quality papers. (Or I just might have bad habit of wanting expensive paper. :giggle:)
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2016   Traditional Artist
Well, for me everything above 1€ is expensive :giggle:
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:iconcoccis:
Coccis Featured By Owner Sep 25, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
:rofl: I used to think that as well. 
Then I bought 100g yarn that was almost 30€. I was cured.  :giggle:
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 25, 2016   Traditional Artist
I think I've fainted. 
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:iconmirielvinya:
MirielVinya Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I use acrylics with watercolor to make some parts of work stronger.
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2016   Traditional Artist
Thank you for the comment :hug:
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:iconmirielvinya:
MirielVinya Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
You're welcome ^^.
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:iconermelin:
Ermelin Featured By Owner Edited Sep 20, 2016   Traditional Artist
White ink! ^^ (At least I hope that's what it's called like in English.)
Especially I like "White 2" by DELETER, because it's possible to mix it with water colours which makes them opaque. It's also great for adding highlights.
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2016   Traditional Artist
Umm...that's something new for me :dummy:...I went to see this and read it's opaque, permanent, and waterproof :O But it's mostly used for manga drawing, right?
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:iconermelin:
Ermelin Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2016   Traditional Artist
Yes, I think Deleter mainly sells art supplies for manga artists. I found their products as a teenager, when I was still dreaming of becoming a manga artist :giggle:
Meanwhile I feel more comfortable drawing illustrations for kids than drawing mangas- but I kept my White 2 ink ^^ It's incredibly useful to fix mistakes and add tiny detail (because water colors mixed with ink are not only opaque, but also less fluid, more like toothpaste).
I don't want to paint without it anymore.

The only drawback is that it really becomes waterproof once it's dry. It takes a few minutes for it to dry, but once it has happened, there's no way of removing it, exept by putting new layers of color over it.
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2016   Traditional Artist
Didn't we all dream of becoming a mangaka? :shrug: :dignity-laugh: 
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:iconxxsensi:
xxsensi Featured By Owner Sep 19, 2016
oh wow!!!!
I didn't know that there were so many effect techniques!
so gonna google those and try them out!
thanks for mentioning it!
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2016   Traditional Artist
Yes, there are quite a number of different techniques :nod:

If you need help with them...I have made a list of useful video tutorials I found on YouTube =D

WATERCOLOR: TECHNIQUES by TokyoMoonlight
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:iconftsarts:
FTSArts Featured By Owner Sep 19, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
I still haven't ventured too far into the effects, but I use rubber cement a lot on my main subjects once I finish their color (or the majority of it) so I can then go crazy on the background without fear of ruining my subjects.
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2016   Traditional Artist
Do you go over it where you have colored it? Doesn't it damage the color (+paper) ? :O
I always used the masking fluid on blank, white paper parts (before I started to paint)...but haven't tried to apply it where I have already colored it.
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:iconftsarts:
FTSArts Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
I couldn't find the fiskars masking fluid and someone suggested rubber cement to me. I do use it after I lay down the colors and once it is dry I use a pink eraser to gently rub it away. I didn't find that it damaged the paper at all. Maybe the tiniest hues came off, but not even barely, because I wait until the paper is completely dry before I apply it. I guess it is just preference which order you do it in. I do think it all comes down to how you remove it though, I just use the pink eraser side of my pencils (works really nicely) making sure I don't apply too much pressure. I used it here on the eagles (I colored them first before the lake and background) Oh and don't judge the method on my art level, that was my first watercolor painting.
The Eagles Congregate.. by FTSArts
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2016   Traditional Artist
Thank you for the reply :happybounce:

I read many people say you "shouldn't" put masking fluid (or similar things) on a painted surface. That's why I was curious ;)

My first watercolor painting wasn't a master piece either I am a dummy!  And for your first try, you shouldn't be ashamed! Nod 
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:iconftsarts:
FTSArts Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
You're welcome, I hope it was helpful for someone at least ;) And thanks, yeah I found out how fun it was and I've been making more paintings since those. I gave that to my dad and he loved it, so that's all that matters :)
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2016   Traditional Artist
That's the point in our polls to talk to each other, to share information.
We all learn...I'm painting for quite a while and still learn something new or don't know everything.

Yes, all it matters it's to make people (including the artist ;) ) happy with making art :nod:
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:iconslytherclawpadawan:
SlytherclawPadawan Featured By Owner Edited Sep 19, 2016  Professional General Artist
I think you need to add "resist" effect, like using oil pastels or crayons. It's a cool technique I'd love to experiment on more myself. :)
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2016   Traditional Artist
There are so many "effects" that you easily can forget some of them :faint: That's why we have the option "other" :giggle:

Thank you for mentioning this one :la:
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:iconslytherclawpadawan:
SlytherclawPadawan Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2016  Professional General Artist
I don't know why but so far I always failed using table (and sea) salt & alcohol, the effects just don't show up much. :( (Sad) Any tips will be appreciated. hmm 
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 19, 2016   Traditional Artist
Maybe those videos will help you... :D (Big Grin) 

For SALT:

youtube Icon  www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZoZCZB…

youtube Icon  youtu.be/ZorlHUx1C1s?t=2m44s

With salt it's important how wet the color is (but don't use to much water either!) and how much salt you use. The shinier/wetter the color is, the more blurry and bigger shapes will appear. If the color has dried a little bit, the effect will show in the shape of tiny little stars or little dots.

And then the adding of salt...the more you manage to sprinkle it in fewer grains the better. If you drop clusters of salt on the paper you will only get a weird wet looking hill of salt on the paper. The more you are able to disperse the salt the better. Don't add too much salt on one small area, this will only "suffocate" the effect.

I'm still not able to get it 100% right each time. So it's a tricky thing sometimes, when you expect to see large crystals to show up, but you get only small tiny dots on your paper...or vice versa.

Do some testing. Try using salt on differently wet color. Add salt as soon as you applied the wet color, the next one wait for the color to dry a little bit, just to have some shine, the next when it's almost completely dry.

Some tones (pigments) of color do better with salt some not...mostly a darker color, richer in pigment the more likely you will have a better result. But not always.

For RUBBING ALCOHOL:

youtube Icon  youtu.be/QeyYDhMnf1E?t=5s

Personal I haven't use this one (it's quite expensive for me ^^; to play around)....so I can't help you.
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:iconslytherclawpadawan:
SlytherclawPadawan Featured By Owner Sep 19, 2016  Professional General Artist
Wow thank you so much for the lengthy reply! :D Yeah I guess the pigment/watercolor paint quality affects a lot & I need more experiments on this. But then what's frustrating is after the water dries up, you have to remove the salt and often times they stick.. then I must use a rough brush to clean it all from the paper.. then the colors (and the salty effect) are ruined.. then the whole painting is damaged..! :cries:
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Edited Sep 19, 2016   Traditional Artist
Removing the salt...sometimes the big clumps dry as a rock. That is a biiiig mess :cutenod: 

But if you have a regular dried color with salt on it, you can remove it with paper =D
What? What do you mean? OMG ANOTHER SHOCK. 

I take a regular paper and put it on top of the area where the salt is and do some circular movements (with the paper, of course) like you would use a grinding paper to smooth something. It's the same principle, only this time you want the salt to get removed. You don't need too much pressure to add. Those circular movements with the paper will break the salt from the paper.

But be careful with the paper. Sometimes (it depends on the color you used, like magenta) the paper will get colored and if you use it on another part of the painting, color can transfer on it. Look from time to time on the other side of the paper if it's still usable, if not, take another one. And also maybe if you use a thin paper (like a copy, printing one) you can see it tear in the middle.

Just try this on a testing "painting". Make a regular salt effect, leave it to dry and then use this blank paper to get rid of the salt.

On some small parts I do the same circular movements just with my finger. You can try this too...but don't press to much, so you don't "hurt" your finger Giggle 
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:iconslytherclawpadawan:
SlytherclawPadawan Featured By Owner Edited Sep 19, 2016  Professional General Artist
:iconoww--plz: :iconamazedfaceplz:
Oooo.. now that's something new, maybe it's not really new for others but I never heard this anywhere. AWESOME! Can't wait to try it, thanks again for the detailed tips! Worship 
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:icontokyomoonlight:
TokyoMoonlight Featured By Owner Sep 19, 2016   Traditional Artist
I didn't read/hear about this...it was just I always used my fingers (hand) to scratch the salt away. But having a bigger area with salt it starts to hurt. So I thought how about using paper instead...I noticed right away that the salt comes off much easier and with less effort, and I manage to be more efficient too, no salt grain is left :cutenod: 
But the salt and the color really have to be completely dry of course :D (Big Grin) 
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:icongeorgiedeeart:
GeorgieDeeArt Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2016  Professional General Artist
I don't really much other mediums at all with watercolour. But I will at times use a fine felt pen or a waterproof felt pen.
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:iconart-by-cricket:
Art-by-Cricket Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Great medium for lining and adding some extra dark shadows! Thanks for sharing :)
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:iconcelesol:
Celesol Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
I clicked on Salt because that's what I use the most but I also adore:

Rubbing alcohol (it's a pretty circumstantial tool, so I don't use it much, but it's glorious in the rare times it's applicable.)

Gel Pens (I use them less than I did when I was a kid because often the white colour is too strong, but it's still great for lots of small stuff)

Paper tissue (second only to salt - I always keep a wadded up tissue next to me when I'm painting. Great for smoothing hard edges or removing the colour from something that looks too dark.)
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:iconart-by-cricket:
Art-by-Cricket Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Excellent tips all :heart:
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:iconlluluwa:
lluluwa Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2016
I love blotting out color with a flat cotton pad to create glowing highlights~
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:iconart-by-cricket:
Art-by-Cricket Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Oh, I love this! Thank you so much for posting it :hug:
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:iconlluluwa:
lluluwa Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2016
Of course, you're welcome! <3
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:iconrhyssafireheart:
RhyssaFireheart Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I completely abuse using salt in my paintings, but I just love how it looks when dry.  I do try to not go overboard though.

I've heard about using rubbing alcohol but haven't tried it yet.  Looking at some videos though that TokyoMoonlight posted above, I think I'm going to definitely try it out.
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:iconart-by-cricket:
Art-by-Cricket Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Great! You really should give it a try. I love painting fantasy and underwater scenes and there is nothing better than rubbing alcohol (in my opinion, that is) for making a bubble effect ;)
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:iconjeskohh:
jeskohh Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
I often use (water)colour pencils to strenghten colours.
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