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Hesperonychus elizabethae by WanderingAlbatross Hesperonychus elizabethae by WanderingAlbatross
Yet another depiction of Hesperonychus! Here, one is traversing a fluvial environment characteristic of the Oldman and Dinosaur park formations. I made a few relatively minor changes to this Hesperonychus reconstruction, including the extension of pennaceous feathers on the legs and the slight lengthening of the primaries (but not too much lengthening, as Longrich and Currie determined that Hesperonychus probably did not resemble Microraptor). This was done in order to make it just a bit more like Sinornithosaurus, which it was possibly most similar to based on its size.
Also present are some of the numerous plant types found in the Dinosaur park formation: Cupressaceae, Moraceae, two different Taxodiozylon (one similar to Taxodium and the other to Glyptostrobus), a well-hidden Podocarpus, one little Gingko, ferns, clubmoss, and horsetails. Some of these are also found in the Oldman formation.
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:iconevodolka:
Evodolka Featured By Owner Nov 6, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
awesome design and pose :D
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:icony87arrow:
y87arrow Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2016
The artist did a good job with the atmosphere on this picture. I even want to be that Hesperonychus. Such a nice place where he's strolling around. If only that place would exist here where I live.
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:iconbrandon-bowling:
brandon-bowling Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2014
This is very nicely done. The gorgeous little dino is almost overshadowed by all the wonderful detail you put into the surrounding plant life. That's quite the pose that guy is in, reminds me a bit of my pet conure Roxton. He sometimes backs up against things with his wings spread out slightly and his tail sticking straight up. I always just thought he was a bit strange, but now I see he's simply been imitating his prehistoric ancestors!
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:iconandorou-khan:
Andorou-Khan Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2013
Beautiful! The fluffy ringed tail reminds me of coatis and lemurs, which seems fitting since those species seem to spend equal amount of time both on the ground and in trees. The way you drew it with it's tail held up makes it seem like it is being used for communication, or maybe as a camouflage among the horsetails :D
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:iconwanderingalbatross:
WanderingAlbatross Featured By Owner Sep 3, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Thank you! Funny thing is, the floofy tail isn't really considered accurate, and the very same day you commented it was requested for use in an online university course, so I revised it! :)
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:iconandorou-khan:
Andorou-Khan Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2013
Nice! It must be satisfying to have your art used to educate people, I remember seeing your Ingenia drawing for an article on the oviraptorosaur tail musculature study, you really got the point of the paper across well with the tail movement and display posture.
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:icongogosardina:
Gogosardina Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
Fuzzy tail aside, this is a stunning rendition.
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2011  Student Writer
*partial non-sagittal, I mean
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2011  Student Writer
I overall disagree with Longrich's and Currie's original statements that it was not a glider, as they themselves admit that it most likely was a glider in some interviews.

The hip socket openings in particular suggest a partial sagittal gait, more adequate for a four winged glider than for a terrestrial predator.
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:iconwanderingalbatross:
WanderingAlbatross Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
I had wondered about that myself, despite what they initially said in the paper (if only because they said it was unclear). I wasn't even aware of the interviews you mention. But that being the case, an artpiece with Hesperonychus in the trees could very well be in order.

Any idea why Longrich portrayed it with a fluffy tail? I found that a bit odd.
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2011  Student Writer
Presumably because he indeed believed it to be terrestrial at the time.

The interview is here:

[link]
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:iconwanderingalbatross:
WanderingAlbatross Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
I suppose so!
Great, thank you very much for the link! I really wish I had known about this before! I just completed another Hesperonychus, and it will be the last one on the ground.

ps. I would really like to learn more about Maniraptoran anatomy. Do you have any good sources?
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2011  Student Writer
In general, :iconmattmart:'s gallery and blog (located on his site) offer good information on how to draw maniraptors.
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:iconwanderingalbatross:
WanderingAlbatross Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
I love checking his blog and gallery out from time to time; all very informative indeed. I don't suppose you know of any books as well? I would like to go beyond simply knowing how to draw them properly, such as how you surmised Hesperonychus was a glider by its hips sockets.
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2011  Student Writer
Most of my information comes from rather generic sources, like essays indicated by people more specialised than I, so I don't really have a lot of literature recomendations.

However, thanks to dilligent work on the part of maniraptor lovers, Wikipedia's pages on the subject tend to be very accurate.
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:iconwanderingalbatross:
WanderingAlbatross Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
Lol, good 'ol Wikipedia. I'll just continue to read and learn as much as I can. Thanks a bunch for your suggestions!
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:iconmesocricetus9:
Mesocricetus9 Featured By Owner Sep 28, 2011
How the hell do you draw like that? Really jealous lol
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:iconxenomorph96:
xenomorph96 Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
it looks like a fox tail xD.
ITS IMPRESSIVE!!
which technique do u use??
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Sep 16, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Amazing job!
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:iconmattmart:
MattMart Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Awesome job! But why a fluffy, Sinosauropteryx-like tail instead of one more Archaeopteryx or Microraptor-like?
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:iconwanderingalbatross:
WanderingAlbatross Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
No idea, actually. I had seen some other artists give them a fluffy tail so I decided to pay homage to their idea. As to why they did it, not a clue. Maybe they confused Sinornithosaurus with Sinosauropteryx? Either way, my next drawing will have a Sinorithosaurusy tail :)
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:iconpilsator:
pilsator Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Totally rocks my boxers.
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:iconchrismasna:
ChrisMasna Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Fantastic!
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:icontoxickittycat:
ToxicKittyCat Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The detail and composition are just fearsome! Amazing job~
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:icontomozaurus:
Tomozaurus Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2011  Student General Artist
This is beautiful.
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September 8, 2011
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