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Where are the fangs?... here there are! by unlobogris Where are the fangs?... here there are! by unlobogris
I couldn't resist to draw my view on the appealing, yet controversial, hypothesis about Smilodon with covered fangs (antediluviansalad.blogspot.com…).

I don't agree with the droopy lips, so I just played with putting the mouth edge near the rear end of the fangs. It turned to have a weird, but still very feline-like expression.

*Edited*- Included the front view and some facial expressions. Top left: mouth closed, top right: slightly agape, bottom left: biting/yawning, bottom right: flehmen gesture.

All the bulk in the neck and so it's just supposed to be fluff, just for the aesthetics...
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:iconrensknight:
RensKnight Featured By Owner Aug 11, 2018  Hobbyist Writer
Good Predator Kitty!  Now win me some hockey! ;)
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:iconajchelett:
AJChelett Featured By Owner May 12, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This looks beautiful, I've often wondered how lips could conceal Smilodon's fangs, and now I now.
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:iconsilverdragon234:
SilverDragon234 Featured By Owner Feb 19, 2018
Bah. This is not how Smilodon's mouth looks like.
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:iconwindwing101:
WindWing101 Featured By Owner Sep 16, 2017
I love these types of reconstructions. The first drawings I saw of lipped smilodons I didn't particularly like, but I didn't want to be like the people who adamantly claim that dinosaurs didn't have feathers, such as T-rex, because they hate the "look."
By all the evidence, it makes the most sense for smilodon to have had lips over their sabers, but the droopy lips that I'd seen I didn't like and I managed to put my finger on the fact that they seemed to canine and not very FELINE. I've seen a lot of concepts of lipped smilodons and the ones which have lips over their sabers and a very FELINE face always seem most plausible to me.
Then again, there's nothing stopping smilodons from having had bulldog-jowls, but based on what felines look like, a design like this feels a lot more real.
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:iconcarrioncorvid:
CarrionCorvid Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I have solution.... big chin! >:^)
Sexy chin.
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:iconwindwing101:
WindWing101 Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2018
oooo yes haha >:D
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:iconcarrioncorvid:
CarrionCorvid Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
For some reason i really like the way this guy looks.
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:iconsparkpenguin:
sparkpenguin Featured By Owner Edited May 23, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
i like these drawings because they're kinda silly and are reminding me of my fat shit cat lying on an ice pack in the next room, but by the same token this theory is ridiculous. smilodons broke their teeth all the time, they were not protected by any perfect answer (at least in smilodon, more on that later*) so that "they need saliva or they break" thing is bunk; they do need a little, and many did break. also on that they can just lick their teeth? all cats/apes/dogs do this? and if they were constantly flapping those jowls around trying to bring down game the resultant damage to that tissue-- even if it were muscled, and not just loose flesh (sorry about flapping)-- would be a constant source of trauma and infection.

*some saber toothed cats did evolve bony structures on the bottom jaw to 'support' the teeth structurally, but the idea that any extra flesh (apart from padding on such a structure) that covered or "holstered" the teeth was thrown out when i was in grade school.

but please,please, PLEASE keep drawing these silly smilodons. i do like this style, and i do like how you visually engineered this theory.
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:iconcartoonben:
CartoonBen Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2017  Student Digital Artist
Looks interesting. Reminds me of a bloodhound, boxer, great dane, or a bulldog.
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:iconhublerdon:
HUBLERDON Featured By Owner Edited Sep 11, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
This is my favorite interpretation of this theory. :)
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:iconpangaea88:
Pangaea88 Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2016
This is by far the most plausible and natural-looking rendition of this theory (which this lifelong Smilodon fanboy found completely convincing) I have seen so far. Lippage that fully envelops the sabers, yet can also be physically retracted for effective biting.

All the faces are beautifully drawn, and it’s easy to see how the various “expressions” correspond to those of extant big cats, which makes this restoration all the more believable. I don’t know if Mauricio Antón is familiar with the “sheathed sabertooth" theory yet, but this is the illustration I would use if I had to make a case of its viability to him or other experts.

I understand why so many people are reluctant to accept the idea that this most iconic of extinct Cenozoic predators kept its signature weapons concealed most of the time. But sometimes we all need to take a step back and remind ourselves that nature does not conform to humanity’s notions of what looks good. If we valued traditional aesthetics over evidence as our grounds for accepting or rejecting new paleontological theories, we’d still be celebrating dinosaurs as bloated quadrupedal lizards à la Crystal Palace Park.
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:iconmrxylax:
mrXylax Featured By Owner Jun 30, 2016
imgur.com/gallery/8OfJIzl and yet this cat lives fine :D
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:iconkingofthetyrants:
KingoftheTyrants Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2016
Yeah, one of my cats (RIP) had a tooth that hung out of the mouth like that. Guess what? It fell out.
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:icontrilobitecannibal:
TrilobiteCannibal Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
no it's a very healthy condition will no ill effects (sarcasm) :p
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:iconseptemberbones:
SeptemberBones Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
sorry but thats actually a serious condition for cats and isnt healthy at all www.ahna.net/blog/check-your-c…
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:icontrilobitecannibal:
TrilobiteCannibal Featured By Owner Sep 3, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
:XD: I love how you turned that on him
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:iconetomo:
Etomo Featured By Owner Jun 27, 2016  Student Digital Artist
I found this from the blog post in question and wanted to say great work! I think you did a great job of taking the idea of covered smilodon fangs and making it look realistic and livable.
Reply
:iconkirbyniferousregret:
KirbyniferousRegret Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
This is probably my favorite long slipped smilodon reconstruction ive seen!
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:iconthesax66:
TheSax66 Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Excelent and facinating work man.
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2016
The moment a bison sees a sabretooth unfurl its lips is probably one of the biggest "Oh CRAP!" moments.
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:iconbensen-daniel:
bensen-daniel Featured By Owner May 29, 2016
He probably talked like Winston Churchill.
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:icondinodc98:
Dinodc98 Featured By Owner May 28, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
Lol well grumpy cat has some competition now, awesome job!
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:iconbh1324:
bh1324 Featured By Owner May 28, 2016
Possibly my favourite reconstruction so far of a lipped Smilodon.
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:icond-juan:
D-Juan Featured By Owner May 28, 2016  Student General Artist
This reconstruction is really convincing. It looks very natural from all views and gestures
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:iconlwpaleoart:
LWPaleoArt Featured By Owner May 27, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
It looks really neat! I think it looks a bit strange where the nose ends, though, and meets the whisker pad...it seems a bit too...rounded, I suppose? At least in the top two profile drawings. The rest look great, however. I'm not sure how to explain it, but my first impression was that its lip was extra "fat" there...

If I can ask, what do you think of my interpretation? I plan on finishing the drawing, so I'd like to know other artists' thoughts on it, and if I should change anything. I think I could pull the lips further down more on mine, but not sure...
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner May 27, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeah, I buy it. This looks great. 
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:iconothellokiir:
othellokiir Featured By Owner May 27, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
XD How cute!
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:iconyutyrannus:
Yutyrannus Featured By Owner May 27, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I'm still not totally sold on this idea, but it is certainly a possibility and it wouldn't completely surprise me if they really did have lips like this. I like your interpretation of this idea, it looks WAY more realistic than all the others :).
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:icongeneralhelghast:
GeneralHelghast Featured By Owner May 27, 2016   General Artist
That is just ridiculous. I mean, its not like being exposed would not cause Smilodon's fangs to fall down. I read this and it all sounds too alien to be the real case for this creature. Its just as controversial and ridiculous as to say that humans are a mixed species or that the earth is flat and 6000 years old or that we came from mermaids. This is obviously just conjured up just to get a reaction from people.
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:iconkingofthetyrants:
KingoftheTyrants Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2016
Actually having exposed canines can lead to the canines rotting and falling off. Happened to by cat. There is already ample evidence that other sabertooth mammals covered their canines.
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:icond-juan:
D-Juan Featured By Owner May 28, 2016  Student General Artist
You have a really weird opinion on this subject. Specially the second part of the post.
Are covered killing teeth really that weird among mammals? Most mammals dont show their teeth unless they have tusks, which have a role in sexual selection. Smilodon canines werent tusks. They were precise killing knives, just like their claws. And covering makes a lot of sense so them dont wear out or break.
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:icongeneralhelghast:
GeneralHelghast Featured By Owner Edited May 28, 2016   General Artist
Of course most mammals don't show their teeth. But perhaps the enamel of Smilodon is stronger than the enamel of modern cats. Also, if Smilodon did have lips, it would have been an obstacle to its killing canines. Bulldog Smilodon my ass. I mean, who are we to compare the teeth of prehistoric apex predators with our weak, delicate teeth? Perhaps prehistoric apex predators had much stronger enamels than the modern predators we have today. Its saddens me to think that people would turn majestic creatures like Smilodon into members of a freak show! I agree that some large, predatory dinosaurs had feathers, but to give them lips would make them look like drawbacks from the 1950's! Perhaps, in life, T-rex would endlessly regrow its teeth like a shark! Perhaps there would be evidence for it!
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:iconmechafire1234:
Mechafire1234 Featured By Owner May 29, 2016
Who are we to compare prehistoric predators with animals today? Are you being serious with this shit?

It can sadden you as much you want. "Perhaps this, perhaps that" your arguments are merely wishful thinking at this point. Until theirs any actual evidence, the small lipped Smilodon is the freak show.
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:icongeneralhelghast:
GeneralHelghast Featured By Owner May 29, 2016   General Artist
Sure prehistoric anumals share some similarities with modern animals, but ghen again, we're not talking about Lamarkianism.
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:icond-juan:
D-Juan Featured By Owner May 28, 2016  Student General Artist
Indeed Tyrannosaurus regrowed its teeth. They were covered with soft tissue when the mouth was shut too.
By that logic we dont know if ceratopsians and prehistoric bovines had a queratine covering on their horns. They could just have unprotected, blunt and indestructible horns right?
And animals arent majestic or freaks. Thats just our concept of them. Animals are functional.
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:icongeneralhelghast:
GeneralHelghast Featured By Owner May 28, 2016   General Artist
We don't even have preserved soft tissue to get to that point. Anyways, back to Smilodon, if it really had lips that covered its teeth, then how come it would need those to compete for mates in the same sense as lions, but more savagely? How can a Smilodon with slobbering lips ever even get a female to have sex with him?
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:icond-juan:
D-Juan Featured By Owner May 29, 2016  Student General Artist
The teeth werent for display as in tusked or horned animals. On conflict between two Smilodon they probably fought mainly with their paws like modern cats, since a throat bite with their canines would mean instant death.
A lipped Smilodon would get a female as easily as a lion, a wolf or a bear.
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:iconinmyarmsinmyarms:
Inmyarmsinmyarms Featured By Owner May 27, 2016  Student Writer
But it would cause them to be eroded and decayed. Saberteeth often have dleicate structures like serrations, which would be destroyed rather quickly without protection.

Plus, the presence of lower jaw flanges in some many species from Thylacosmilus to Barbourofelis to gorgonopsids pretty much spells it out loud that these canines were sheathed.
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:icongeneralhelghast:
GeneralHelghast Featured By Owner May 27, 2016   General Artist
Well perhaps some teeth are more immune to dental erosion to others. Smilodon's long sabers must have been too strong to erode and decay while exposed. Hopefully someone would disprove the whole bulldog cat nonsense.
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner May 28, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It has been proven by cross section analysis that Smilodon teeth have the same structure as other feline teeth.
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:icongeneralhelghast:
GeneralHelghast Featured By Owner May 28, 2016   General Artist
Right, but the guy in the blog forgot to mention that felines, Smilodon especially, would often clean their teeth with their tongues. Eventually, I hope, there would be evidence against that ludicrous post. Just because one posts a blog doesn't make it true.
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner May 28, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Felines do lick their teeth, but not regularly, and they don't do it while sleeping. The author actually brought this up as one of the counterpoints people brought up that wouldn't really work, if I remember right.

Maybe, but that's wishful thinking more than anything, like it would be to wait for evidence that Velociraptor didn't have any feathers after all... Structure of the bones, comparisons with living relatives, etc. point towards covered fangs. It isn't some kind of ''Stegosaurus could fly using its plates'' hypothesis that people made up just to joke and confuse, it has plenty of reason.
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:icongeneralhelghast:
GeneralHelghast Featured By Owner May 28, 2016   General Artist
Okay, fine! Make it woof , shit, and act exactly like a dog and prove me wrong! I bet Smilodon's enamel sabers were too evolved to erode and decay from the wind just like the weak, soft teeth of lions, tigers, wolves, humans, and kitty cats. Sabertooths have been extinct and we have not seena living one since! What next? Theropod dinosaurs going back to the outdated kangaroo stance? Ridiculous!
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:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner May 29, 2016
Enamel demineralizes once it contacts air and the elements in it, but saliva contains calcium, fluoride, and phosphate ions slows that breakdown. But this effect only works if the teeth are lubricated 24/7, so the solution is lips to keep the teeth bathed in saliva.
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
"Okay, fine! Make it woof , shit, and act exactly like a dog and prove me wrong! "

That's an appeal-to-ridicule fallacy.




"I bet Smilodon's enamel sabers were too evolved to erode and decay from the wind just like the weak, soft teeth of lions, tigers, wolves, humans, and kitty cats."

This doesn't even make any sense. They have the same composition, and how are modern carnivoran teeth weak and soft?




"Sabertooths have been extinct and we have not seena living one since!"

You could go around denying everything about palaeofauna using that.




"Perhaps prehistoric apex predators had much stronger enamels than the modern predators we have today."

And how does that even work? Enamel is somehow stronger in prehistoric times? How does that even work? It's the same material. It's like saying that 3-billion year old rocks are harder than 10,000-year-old rocks of the exact same composition.


Now, I do think bulldog machairodonts are a bit far-fetched and I think tooth pockets similar to that of clouded leopards, except larger, are much more likely. But you can't just go around wanting nature to strictly conform to your favored aesthetic, especially if you use poorly-thought out statements like a certain material (enamel) somehow being stronger and more resistant in prehistoric times than in the present even though it's the exact same material.
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(1 Reply)
:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Edited May 28, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yes, sabertooth teeth were completely unlike the fossil evidence because you want them to be so!
Truly a revolutionary way to study extinct animals you propose here, let's all just hope any evidence we don't like turns out to be wrong, and shut ourselves away from the science involved until that happens!
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:iconinmyarmsinmyarms:
Inmyarmsinmyarms Featured By Owner May 27, 2016  Student Writer
Ah yes, the teeth long noted as much delicate by canine standards are more resistant to erosion than far more robust modern carnivoran canines now.

Nature doesn't conform to your sense of aesthetics.
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:iconblazze92:
bLAZZE92 Featured By Owner May 27, 2016
The answer to that most likely lies in the microstructure and that of saber tooth cat sabers is, apparently, typical for a mammal, it is not like the microstructure of mammals with teeth always exposed to the elements.
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:iconaang10:
Aang10 Featured By Owner May 27, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
I don't know if I agree with this.
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:iconaang10:
Aang10 Featured By Owner May 27, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
After all smilodons teeth were really long and even with lips like a Saint Bernard the fangs wouldn't be completely covered.
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