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USS Enterprise CV-6 by tr4br USS Enterprise CV-6 by tr4br
USS Enterprise (CV-6), colloquially referred to as the "Big E, Lucky E, The Galloping Ghost, The Grey Ghost," was the sixth aircraft carrier of the United States Navy and the seventh U.S. Navy ship to bear the name. Launched in 1936, she was a ship of the Yorktown class, and one of only three American carriers commissioned prior to World War II to survive the war (the others being Saratoga and Ranger). She participated in more major actions of the war against Japan than any other US ship. On three separate occasions during the Pacific War, the Japanese announced that she had been sunk in battle, earning her the name "The Grey Ghost".

Enterprise is credited for being the first US Navy ship to sink a Japanese warship in WWII. 8 April 1942, she departed to rendezvous with Hornet and sail west, escorting Hornet on the mission to launch 16 Army B-25 Mitchells in the "Doolittle Raid" on Tokyo.

Enterprise entered the New York Naval Shipyard on 18 January 1946 for deactivation, and was decommissioned on 17 February 1947. In 1946, she had been scheduled to be handed over to the state of New York as a permanent memorial, but this plan was suspended in 1949. Subsequent attempts were made at preserving the ship as a museum or memorial, but fund-raising efforts failed to raise enough money to buy the vessel from the Navy, and the "Big E" was sold on 1 July 1958 to the Lipsett Corporation of New York City for scrapping at Kearny, New Jersey. A promise was made to save the distinctive tripod mast for inclusion in the Naval Academy's new football stadium, but was never fulfilled; instead, a memorial plaque was installed at the base of what is still called "Enterprise Tower." Scrapping was complete as of May 1960. In 1984, a permanent "Enterprise Exhibit" was dedicated at the Naval Aviation Museum, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida to house artifacts, photos and other items of historical interest.

In November 1961, her name was revived with the commissioning of USS Enterprise (CVN-65), the world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, which is also nicknamed the "Big E". Various artifacts and mementos (including one of her portholes) are kept aboard. The port holes in the captain's in-port cabin/conference room on the present "Enterprise" CVN-65 are from the CV-6. One of CV-6's own pilots would serve as its Captain.

The Enterprise (CVN-65) was inactivated and removed from service on 1 December, 2012 after being in the fleet for 51 years. Due to needs involving reactor removal, it will be unable to be turned into a memorial. However, announced on the same day, was news the ninth ship to bear the name Enterprise would be the scheduled Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carrier, CVN-80. It has not been confirmed what, if any, artifacts from USS Enterprise (CV-6) will be incorporated into this next generation aircraft carrier. The aforementioned port holes aboard the CVN-65, will be removed and returned to the Boston Navy Yard Museum. They will hopefully be used on the CVN-80

Enterprise earned 20 battle stars, the most for any U.S. warship in World War II. Some have labeled her the most glorious and honored ship in the history of the United States Navy, rivaled only perhaps by the 18th century frigate USS Constitution. The Enterprise was awarded a Presidential Unit Citation for her service during World War II, becoming the first US warship in history to receive a Presidential Unit Citation.

Honors and awards:

Campaign Star
Battle Star (20)
Presidential Unit Citation
Navy Unit Commentation
American Defense Service Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
World War II Victory Medal
Philippine Presidential Unit Citation
Philippine Liberation Medal (1 Star)
British Admiralty Pennant
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:iconjimbowyrick1:
Jimbowyrick1 Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
My late father, CDR. James W Wyrick, as an ensign, served on Enterprise from the beginning of 1942 until the end of that year.  He was in command of the forward, starboard, 5" AA gun position.
He saw first hand all of the battles and events that the Big E participated in.
During the Battle of Santa Cruz, he saved the ship from destructive secondary explosions, immediately after it took a bomb hit near the forward ammo magazine, by quickly organizing a "bucket brigade" of men to pass hot ammo out of the magazine and toss it over board.
He was honored with the Navy Cross, second only to the Medal of Honor, for his bravery and quick thinking.
In 1943 he entered flight school, and got his wings just as the war ended.
He commanded an air group of Panther jets, during the Korean War, and saw lots of action doing that.
Thanks for posting the picture.

Check-out my site.
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:iconartzicon:
Artzicon Featured By Owner Aug 11, 2017
As a baby boomer I was very proud of my Father's service in the United States Navy during WWII.
He went to summer school to get his diploma so he could enlist and join the war effort. After boot camp
he volunteered to serve with the Navy gun crews assigned to protect the Liberty ships. His made his final
voyage home to the USA on the USS Hancock CV-19, and told me that standing on the deck of that carrier
was his proudest moment as a Navy Sailor. God Bless our Veterans... those who fought and returned,
and those who gave their last breath for the freedom of our United States of America. He had another
brother in the Navy, one in the Army, and one in the Army Air Corps. Through God's Grace, they all survived.
THANK YOU tr4br for your photograph and history on the USS Enterprise. 
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:iconeyeswide71:
eyeswide71 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2017
Carl Vinson was the SecNav at some time after WW ll, I can't remember when.
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:icondrivernjax:
drivernjax Featured By Owner Jun 9, 2017
Enterprise Rent-a-Car was named after the USS Enterprise (CV-6) as was the USS Enterprise of Star Trek.  The founder of Enterprise Rent-a-Car and, from what I recall, Gene Roddenberry both served on the Enterprise.
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:iconbomsteinam:
bomsteinam Featured By Owner May 20, 2017  Professional Artist
USS Enterprise CV-6 is a United States Navy Aircraft Carrier that turned the sea bound band of brother with 5 years of baptism and hell to peace and freedom. She's an Aircraft Carrier that lost both her sister ships USS Yorktown CV-5 and USS Hornet CV-8 in action. She may have been severely hurt and bleeding from enemy bomb hits, but that never stopped her from fighting her enemies in the battlefield. She was hurt enough to limp into repair dry dock for repairs to her battle wounds. But that never stopped her from going into battle against her enemies. Yet the Japanese Reported Enterprise sunk 6 times when really she was in repair dry dock undergoing major overhaul and returned to sea on Christmas Eve. She was hit by 2 Japanese Kamikazes. The first Japanese Kamikaze never stopped Enterprise from fighting her enemies. But the second Japanese Kamikaze knocked her dead on. She so badly hurt that she had no chose but to permenantly leave the battlefield and back to Pearl Harbor for full repairs to her flight deck. After the war, Enterprise led the red carpet perade. On July 1, 1958, USS Enterprise CV-6 was towed to Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company in Kareny New Jersey for scrap. This fate that Enterprise faced was not what she deserved. She deserved better than that. She was just about to become a floating memorial. But instead, she was scrapped. No Aircraft Carrier should ever have to face that fate! Ever! They should also have a happy ending of becoming a floating memorial. But never should any Aircraft Carrier ever be scrapped! You can scrap a ship, but you can not scrap legend.
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:iconjimbowyrick:
Jimbowyrick Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
My father, Ensign James W Wyrick served on CV-6 between Jan. '42 and Dec. 42.
He was in command of a 5" gun crew, on and off in that period.
He witnessed the first raids on Wake Island.
He witnessed Doolittle's raiders ascending from Yorktown.
He witnessed Midway.
At Santa Cruz, when Enterprise took a 550 lb bomb hit on the flight deck (see YouTube), near my father's station, he quickly organized a "bucket brigade" of men to gather and toss hot ammo over the ship's side, preventing, possibly, devastating secondary explosions.
He was honored with the Navy Cross, 2nd only to the MOH, for his actions.
Please visit www.larouchepac.com, and see who is keeping the spirit of those times, alive.
Best, Jimbo
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:iconmensjedezeemeermin:
MensjeDeZeemeermin Featured By Owner Jan 1, 2017
A great shot of a terrible warrior who guarded our nation so bravely... for such sorry thanks.
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:iconbattlecruiser006:
battlecruiser006 Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2016
Shame she was scrapped.
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:iconanzac-a1:
Anzac-A1 Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2016
The Grey Ghost will never die.
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:iconbattlecruiser006:
battlecruiser006 Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2016
True.
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:iconhannahelizabethh:
hannahelizabethh Featured By Owner May 24, 2016  Student General Artist
Nice photo :)
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:iconmidway2009:
Midway2009 Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
The 'Lucky E.' :salute:
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:iconrebeldude86:
Rebeldude86 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2015
I was watching that show called Battle 360 a while ago and when i saw what they did to Her at the end i was almost in tears. So sad to scrap such an amazing ship.
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:icontemplerman:
templerman Featured By Owner Edited Feb 27, 2015
This really steams me! Not your image (it's always good to see new images of the ENTERPRISE) and information packet, but that the USN is again snubbing the Enterprise. This ship should be parked at Pearl Harbor, across from the Arizona Memorial, and the Big Mo. Now to hear that her venerable namesake is being treated highhandedly and robbed of memorial status makes me want to have some Navy brass walk the plank. Even if they do make the CV-80 the new Big-E, it's just plain insult added to injury. Makes me glad I am an Air Force Brat!
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:iconfirevalkyrie:
Firevalkyrie Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Scrapping the reactor out of a nuclear ship doesn't really leave anything left to use as a memorial - if you've seen the hulk of USS Long Beach before she was scrapped, all that was left was a stripped-out hull. They had to take apart everything on deck level to get to the reactor. With the Enterprise, my understanding is that everything from amidships back has to be taken out to just above the waterline in order to get the reactors out, and there's not even a plan to be able to put that back together.

We'd be better off trying to have Nimitz preserved - she only has two reactors, vs. eight for Enterprise, and there's probably a better chance of being able to remove them without completely destroying the ship in the process.
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:iconsullimike23:
SulliMike23 Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2015
That makes two of us. Both your statement and the fact that we're both Air Force Brats.
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:iconraguleader:
RaguLeader Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
There was one point in 1942 where the Enterprise was the only American carrier operating in the entire Pacific.  Her crew adopted the slogan "Enterprise against the world!"
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:iconanzac-a1:
Anzac-A1 Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2016
Not quite, it was "Enterprise vs Japan".
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:iconlordomegaz:
LordOmegaZ Featured By Owner Mar 17, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Enterprises never die, they just come back in another form in history to kick more ass! :)
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:icondemondogmarine1960:
DemonDogMarine1960 Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2013
The Enterprise single-handedly fought the Empire of Japan, when all other carriers were sunk.  It participated in the Battle of Midway, and also escorted the USS Hornet CV-8 on the Doolittle Raid.
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:icondemondogmarine1960:
DemonDogMarine1960 Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2013
They should have shot all the Democrat bastards of the time for sending this Immortal ship to the scrap yard!!  I would have shot em all, starting with that bastard Roosevelt!!
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:icontemplerman:
templerman Featured By Owner Edited Feb 27, 2015
Sorry Devildog, just slow your jets. Unfortunately, the cause was that the Navy wanted an all jet carrier force, and wanted to have their share of the control the Nuclear weapons with the Army and Air Force. Congress was talking push-button wars, with no need for a Navy. The Big-E was just not capable of having its decks reworked for jets. And by the end of the War much of Congress had started to shift back into conservative Democrats and Republican hands, and it was they who say big ships as wasteful. People wanted their lives to start up again, to have homes and cars and no more rationing. Those folks fought the war on the Home front every bit as much as the men did. Don't forget not once have we as a people throughout the wars on Terror had to sacrifice one bit. Roosvelt was a former Undersecretary of the Navy. He, like his Uncle Teddy, never met a ship they didn't like. The Navy loved him so much they pulled the CV-47 Essex Class Fleet Carrier set to be USS MIDWAY out of the rotation and renamed her Franklin D. Roosevelt in hounor of his death.
Even so, As I said The Big-E CV-6 should be moored next to the Arizona, and the New Jersey at Pearl Harbor. Where the War began, its greatest combatant sailed out of to do battle, and the ship that the war ended on all ride at anchor. Parts of her are still around, and were incorporated into CVN-65, as will parts of them both be incorporated into the new Big-E CV-80 Gerry Ford Class. Like SAC, the Big-E will be back, and better then ever.
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:iconalexsdu:
alexsdu Featured By Owner Edited Dec 2, 2014
Why Roosevelt? He got nothing to do with it. He died before the war over. Enterprise was scraped after the war.
I bet if he was still alive, by that time, he would want the Enterprise to be save.
Bill Halsey even try to collect donation to buy that ship and make it into a museum, instead of having it scrape.
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:iconfirevalkyrie:
Firevalkyrie Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Eisenhower, a Republican, was President when the decision was made to scrap the Enterprise.
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:iconleonsls:
leonsls Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2013
The Big E was there from the start, just hours away from Pearl Harbor when it was attacked and fought in every major carrier battle.  The original Lexington CV-2, Yorktown CV-5, and Hornet CV-8 along with Saratoga CV-3, and Wasp CV-7 were there with the Big E when they were battling a seemingly unstoppable in the Japanese.  Those ships and the men who served on them fought and died holding the line until those newer ships could be built to replace them and they didn't have the newer planes and weapons, nor numbers the ship you mention did.   Sadly only the Saratoga and Enterprise survived the war in the Pacific.  I don't think the Enterprise took anything away from any of the ships you mentioned.  She was just in the fight longer.

I do wish they would stop naming our carriers after politicians.  Go back to the system of naming them after ships out of history and the battles from American history.  I don't know who half the people they are named after are.


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:iconflandre495:
flandre495 Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2014  Student General Artist
You don't know Abraham Lincoln? What a pity.
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:iconleonsls:
leonsls Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2014
I know Lincoln, but I personally don't feel Gerald Ford warrants having a carrier named after him.  Who is Carl Vinson?  I can see Nimitz, but George HW Bush?
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:iconflandre495:
flandre495 Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2014  Student General Artist
George Bush is seriously a really dumb name. George Washington is fine, but naming the poor flattop after Bush sounds like humiliation. :/
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:iconmicroscopics-untd:
Microscopics-UNTD Featured By Owner Aug 21, 2013  Student Interface Designer
With all due respect; I still say that this ship stole the fame away from the more famous and bigger carriers like the Yorktown CV-10; the Lady Lex CV-16; The Hornet CV-12; and the Intrepid CV-11.
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:iconanzac-a1:
Anzac-A1 Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2016
If they're more famous, why is Enterprise more well known? You don't understand how fame works.
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:iconmicroscopics-untd:
Microscopics-UNTD Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2016  Student Interface Designer
Yeah I know, but my argument is, had the Enterprise gone to NYC to be a museum, the Intrepid would most likely not have made it to NYC, as the tourists would flock to the Big E instead. 
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:iconanzac-a1:
Anzac-A1 Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2016
So?
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:iconmicroscopics-untd:
Microscopics-UNTD Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2016  Student Interface Designer
Ok, I admit, the Enterprise should have been saved, but the Saratoga should have been saved too. Both ships met terrible fates. 
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:iconwolfman-053:
Wolfman-053 Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2014
She was for a time the only carrier we had in the Pacific until the Essex-class carriers began to arrive, with some of them bearing the names of her lost sisters and an old friend, USS Lexington (CV-2)...
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:iconmicroscopics-untd:
Microscopics-UNTD Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2014  Student Interface Designer
Pity about the old Lex; and the Sister Sara. Why go and nuke her when she could of being turned into a museum ship? 
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:iconwolfman-053:
Wolfman-053 Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2014
I figure politics. None of the prewar carriers, other than the Big E, survived for very long after the war. Ranger (CV-4) was scrapped immediately (something I figure they'd been planning for some time, since the ship was a white elephant of the worst sort), and we both know what happened to Saratoga...
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:iconmicroscopics-untd:
Microscopics-UNTD Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2014  Student Interface Designer
Used in the Bikini Atoll Nuclear Tests! :bleh: 
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:iconwolfman-053:
Wolfman-053 Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2014
More precisely, Operation CROSSROADS, which was the very first weapons effects (ie. effects of nuclear weapons) test ever performed.
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:iconmicroscopics-untd:
Microscopics-UNTD Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2014  Student Interface Designer
Now I remember what it was called! :D 
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:iconwolfman-053:
Wolfman-053 Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2014
Do yourself a favor and try to obtain a copy of Trinity and Beyond: The Atomic Bomb Movie for yourself, if only because of the explosions...
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(1 Reply)
:icondodge-the-bullet:
Dodge-The-Bullet Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
They must keep the legacy going!
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:iconawb2012:
AWB2012 Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2013
yet again what happens with the assholes in charge are DEMOCRATS & LIBERALS!!!!!!
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:iconraguleader:
RaguLeader Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
When democrats and liberals are in charge, we win World War II?  That doesn't sound like a bad deal.
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:iconebolasparklebear:
EbolaSparkleBear Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2013
Oh shut up.
Democrats back then were the conservatives.
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:iconawb2012:
AWB2012 Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2012
I CANNOT BELIEVE THE "TOP BRASS" LET HER BE SCRAPPED AFTER THE WAR!!!! THAT REALLY PISSES ME OFF!!!!!
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:iconjdunk1971:
JDunk1971 Featured By Owner Sep 3, 2014
I think it was a combination of the Navy wanted their share of the new jet propulsion technology and none of the earlier carriers could launch the new jets, and that everyone wanted to put the recent war behind them; kind of a 'too soon' moment to think about museum ships and such.   By the time a drive to preserve the historic ships started in the early 1960s, the most historic ships had been sent to the breakers 5 or 6 years before.   By then supercarriers were the latest and greatest, and so the Brass decided the best they could do to honor the memory of the 'Big E' was to name the first nuclear-powered supercarrier in her honor.   Now, even that ship is gone, just wore out after 50 years of faithful and honorable service.   I just hope the Navy names one of the new carriers being built at Newport News 'Enterprise' in order to carry on the tradition.
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:icononikage108:
Onikage108 Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2012
It's a damn shame they scrapped the Big E; there should have been mass support to turn her into a museum ship. Maybe if we get time-travelling machines, we can go back in time and ensure that the Big E lives.
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:icongriml0ck122:
GRIML0CK122 Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2013
enterprises are always scrapped.
never sunk and then reborn as a new carrier
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:icononikage108:
Onikage108 Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2013
Ah well
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:iconlordlunacy:
lordlunacy Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012
The legend herself, sad they scrapped her.
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