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Disney layoffs, 2D animation, and you

Fri Apr 12, 2013, 2:33 PM
A very nervous animation student (he didn't say, but I assume he is studying 2D animation) asked me about my opinions on the state of animation these days.  What are the companies thinking with laying off all the employees, not doing 2D animation, canceling great TV series, etc.?  Are the business people just evil?  AND the even bigger question: Is John Lassiter a jerk (or worse) for letting all the 2D animators at Disney go yesterday?  

MY ANSWER:  I have a slightly controversial (for an artist) perspective on businesses and business people.  Over all, I like them.  At times, I have even been grateful for them.  (Steady paychecks should never be taken for granted.  Wait till you don't have one one day, then you'll know!) Remember, we live in a world where businesses are expected to make money to stay alive.  It's called capitalism. Others call it "business". That means, the animation world isn't any different from any other job/company. I see the other side of the equation since I owned my own company for about 8 years. It was a small studio, but until you work "out in the real world" away from mom and dad's money and/or a companies' steady paycheck, you have no idea how hard it is to stay afloat as an artist. I don't suggest it to people right after art school by any means. That doesn't mean I think that studios are run poorly at times.  They OFTEN are.  Its is near impossible to find a person that understands creative people AND knows business well enough to run a studio.  That person was NOT Walt Disney, as many of you think.  Walt had his brother Roy, to handle the money side of things and make sure Walt didn't destroy the company.  And he would have.  Imagine a world where Disney animation only made "Snow White".  That's the Disney company with Walt as the sole head.  You need both sides and I admit, the Disney company of today (and for years now) is short sighted.  They want quick money and are not looking long term at investments and legacy, as they should.  They say they are, but its obvious they are not.  

Has power gone to John Lassiter's head?  Is he an evil businessman now?  Not evil, that's for sure.  More business minded than ever before, yes, he has to be.  Its part of his job.  It was when he was just creative head of Pixar, but it could take a back seat a bit in that job (there were other "Roy's" that could do that heavy lifting).  Now, he has MUCH more on his shoulders and he's spread very thin.  As far as the 2D animators that just got laid off?  He was the guy that KEPT them there for the past couple years when they (largely) had very little to do.   They were making money for YEARS and not doing much.  Ask them, they will tell you the same thing.  Its not what they wanted, and they have been fighting to get some 2D projects going the whole time.  But don't think that any other studio/ studio head would have kept about 20 highly paid (based on years of service and compared to some of the younger CG guys for sure) for years without an actual production for them to work on!  No way.  Only at Disney and only under John's eye/hand.  They were his friends and he wanted them there.  At least until the Board couldn't stand the bleeding ink on the stocks, etc.  I don't know the whole story, few do, but this is how these things work.  Believe me, Lassiter is not a saint, but he knows talent and values good people.

So, do you go into animation/ stay in animation school or not?  Well, if you can see yourself doing ANYTHING ELSE and still be content, then maybe you should look into those things. Your life will be easier. If you can't imagine drawing and being creative every day, then go for it. Your life won't be easy, but it will be happier. Its really that simple. Also, keep in mind, time moves forward. Things change. When some companies close, others open up that you never thought would. So, pursue what your dreams (with some 'safety measures, like learning computer animation also, perhaps) and have faith that life happens weather you are happy or not, so choose to be happy.  There's nothing wrong with doing a "boring day job" if it pays the bills for your family and you stay up late doing your creative dream project.  That may happen too.  As long as you flex those creative muscles, it might be nice to not have deadlines and pressure of paying bills with your artwork.

  • Listening to: pandora
  • Reading: Invincible
  • Watching: Modern Family
  • Playing: by writing this journal
  • Eating: too, too much.
  • Drinking: afternoon coffee
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:iconbfan1138:
BFan1138 Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2014  Student General Artist
Here's an eye opening article I just read about whether or not 3D animation ACTUALLY makes more than 2D generally:  www.examiner.com/article/does-…


It consists of 4 parts, but I couldn't find any links leading to the next one, so you have to change the part number in the URL to continue.  It certainly makes me question the motives (as well as intelligence) of studio executives.
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:iconntoond:
ntoond Featured By Owner May 25, 2013
Though Animation is a commercial art for Feature Studios, it is truly a High Art when such talents as those Disney Features had as a team are brought together. Their films educate, archive knowledge and help to design the future of our society. Animation is an art form that requires pooling together the talents of every High Art in society to create the singular High Art of the Animated Feature Film (2D and/or 3D). It is hard to hold any studio responsible for such high ideals as the High Arts, being it is business and a commercial art, Disney did achieve High Art during it’s renaissance. Disney did this because of the choices made by the collaboration of incredible talent brought together at the time. We, the artists, felt responsibility for our creations and a love for the art and those people who enjoy it. I and my amazing wife, Norma, had the incredible privilege of being part of the legend. The legend was the team, the amazing pool of creators we belonged too. To us, they are family. Whether we got along or not doesn’t matter because we all wanted the same thing. We wanted to achieve greatness in our art. We loved the same things and decades later we still love the same things. We are family. The journey of Beauty and the Beast, Alladdin, Lion King, etc. etc. was historic to our art form but what was most amazing was the legendary team we were. The amazing talent working and struggling through the trenches of production, accomplishing the seemingly impossible, “Building Dreams”.

I met my wife at Disney. We were married during the production of Beauty and the Beast. I was an artist on The Beast and she was an artist being used by The Bell team at the time. While she was drawing Bell and I was drawing The Beast, we worked in a building called The Heart Building. Teams, Dreams …Disney… made our future.

It is sad to see the Traditional Animation team broken up and some may consider it the loss of a legend. I don’t see it quite that way. You see our art form is a fine balance of funding/budget, quality and time. Most think of it as just an issue of quality. Recognizing that the team we were at Disney was a pool of some of the best talent in the world, I also realize how important it is to seed the world with the best to, in fact, raise the art form of animation as a whole. This is actually what is happening now as a result of Disney releasing so much of their talent. We are now seeing a great thing happen though it may feel, to some, like the rose flowers have been cut off the plant. Disney has always been masterful in bringing the most incredible talents together to create, as a business and commercial art, some of the most lasting High Art Animations in world history. It is very likely they will continue to do so no matter what path animation as an art form takes in the future. They will build legendary teams and those individuals will spread the knowledge and art throughout the world. As they do so, new legendary teams will form in other places as funding is raised. This is the miracle of our business and the wonder of animation. To continue having gorgeous flowers, the rose must be trimmed, nurtured, and cared for, and you must even dump some manure on them otherwise it’s just a thorn bush. The world of animation is a multitude of colors and tones when it grows everywhere. 2D animation will never die but rather take root in different forms. If the world truly wants the old art style of 2D animation, funding will come together for it at some amazing studio and audiences will flock to the films again. The art must evolve with the audience though just as the audience evolves with the art.

The artists of Disney are legends because the art form is legendary. Having been granted the privilege of being part of the team during those legendary times has been an honor, a wonder, an incredible journey and one of the most amazing parts of my life so far. My best wishes to every artist and creative talent of Disney who are part of molding our world. You are the Legend. The artists of all Feature Studios like those I’ve worked for; Sullivan Bluth, Kroyer, Amblimation, etc. ect. are the true legends. We build the dreams that build the world. Hope grows in the heart of art.

Johan Klingler
[link]
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:icondeldiz:
DelDiz Featured By Owner May 17, 2013
Tom, I'm curious, do you think Disney bases the assumption that 3D is more popular than 2D on the fact that Tangled made more than Princess and The Frog?
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:icontombancroft:
tombancroft Featured By Owner May 19, 2013  Professional Filmographer
It usually comes down to money in all these biz situations/decisions, so yes, that's a big part of the equation.
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:icondeldiz:
DelDiz Featured By Owner May 19, 2013
What I mean is, Tangled's release date coincided with only one or two other family movies out at the time. Princess and the Frog was released at Christmas time, alongside several holiday films, family films including Alvin and the Chipmunks 3, James Cameron's Avatar, not to mention UP was still showing in a few select features. Despite all the competition (some of it good some of it bad) Princess and the Frog still made a great profit. If it had been released when there weren't as many family films to choose from, like Tangled was, who's to say it wouldn't have matched or even done better than Tangled profit-wise?
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:icontombancroft:
tombancroft Featured By Owner May 20, 2013  Professional Filmographer
Really good point.
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:icondeldiz:
DelDiz Featured By Owner May 20, 2013
Do you think that was taken into account at all by Disney?
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:icontombancroft:
tombancroft Featured By Owner May 21, 2013  Professional Filmographer
Not enough.
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:icondeldiz:
DelDiz Featured By Owner May 21, 2013
Common sense, to what far shore hast thou flown?
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:icondeldiz:
DelDiz Featured By Owner May 19, 2013
Well, there's something that's been bothering me about that factor, and I don't know if I'm just being na´ve about this, but it seems like it would have made a big difference in the profit margins...
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:iconedwarddavies1:
EdwardDavies1 Featured By Owner May 16, 2013
Tom, i'm curious. Are u still working at Disney?
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:icontombancroft:
tombancroft Featured By Owner May 17, 2013  Professional Filmographer
Not now, but I worked in feature animation for 12 years about 10 years ago.
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:iconedwarddavies1:
EdwardDavies1 Featured By Owner May 17, 2013
Wow, that's a long time.
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:iconedwarddavies1:
EdwardDavies1 Featured By Owner May 16, 2013
I mean, do u still work for Disney? Sorry I messed up at my words.
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:iconedwarddavies1:
EdwardDavies1 Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2013
Will there be a strong future for the animation style used to create paperman? I really loved it and it won best animated short.
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:iconhyperagua:
Hyperagua Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
true
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:icontombancroft:
tombancroft Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2013  Professional Filmographer
Who knows, but I doubt it. It was a very labor-intensive, expensive process, I can't see anyone doing that for a feature film.
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:iconedwarddavies1:
EdwardDavies1 Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2013
So do u think theres any hope left for 2D animation?
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:icontombancroft:
tombancroft Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2013  Professional Filmographer
It will still be around, just in shorts and European films.
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:iconedwarddavies1:
EdwardDavies1 Featured By Owner May 8, 2013
I hear that Disney is in early development of a feature film that's using the same techniques as Paperman, and it's being directed by Ron Clements and John Musker.
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:iconawesomestarz:
awesomestarz Featured By Owner Apr 19, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
I need to ask this, as I want and pray to become a successful animator in the future.
How much money do animators make annualy?
Also, what schools do you recomend that I attend to study in this field?
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:icontombancroft:
tombancroft Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2013  Professional Filmographer
They make enough. But, if you only want to do it for the money, become a plumber. I would go to Ringling School of Art and Design, CalArts, or SCAD, amoung a few others.
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:iconyupasama:
Yupasama Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2013
I read mostly all your comments.

I want to say something:

if you put your work on internet, even just some teaser for bigger thing to buy, we will be there.

I love 2d animation, I try to buy short movies from small companies or individuals. I buy arts from some animators in exposition, in France.

There is many initiative on internet.
I follow stuff like
- [link] (the times are very hard for japanese animators too)
- [link]
- [link] (a short movie by young animators with help from japanese government for studios training students)

I follow a lot of blogs, websites, deviant users and so on, whom I think they can become professionals one day and support them by buying their work. There is many works from Russia, France, Korea, and so on. There is a market for it, but you have to think globally (I least to provide subtitles).

You can't do alone, because an artist is not a business person, but you have to build a portfolio, put it on vimeo, youtube, blogs, festivals and so on.

Don't be shy to ask a price. Your work has value. It can be painful to read angry cheap people complaining, or to not win many money thanks to your artwork at first but you have to try and build it with time. Some stuff free, all the other paid. I will pay to see the whole work, I will buy bluray. I already do that.

Time are tough, but you are not alone and you have to think global market. I'm not from the US or Canada but I can support, not everyone, but as much I can, I want to see more animations and stories, I'm not the only one.

The point is: put your work or part of your work on internet and we will find you. Easier than if you put nothing.
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:icontombancroft:
tombancroft Featured By Owner Apr 19, 2013  Professional Filmographer
Great perspective. I agree, we all need to stop protecting our "babies" and get them out there. I am starting to do that as of this year. Thanks!
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:iconfreakiegeekie:
FreakieGeekie Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
It's sad that they had to go but if they're not really working, you can't justify keeping them, even if it pains you to let them go.
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:iconomnitilly:
OmniTilly Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2013
When I heard the news, I just felt like crying. Really. But I have hope.
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:iconoolinstant0miso0soup:
oOlinstant0miso0soup Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks for this..!! I've been seriously worried about the state of 2D animation in the States, but it's something I love so much, I honestly wouldn't be able to function without having the freedom to work creatively in some capacity. Maybe one day, as companies and certain aspects of film-making and animating become more readily available to independent artists, we might even see the rise of more indie animation in the same way Youtube has created an almost new way to watch TV (? Computer monitors?? lol).
Here's to not giving up hope and working hard! :)
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:iconiamkooi:
IamKooi Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2013   General Artist
Great insights. Many times people forget that like everything else art is a business. You have to decide what you want in life and at what level you want it. The same thing is happening all over the field right now with digital effects as well as 2D animators.

I've always looked at it like this... If you want Disney, Pixar, movies or other flashy pins in your resume you have to work for it and work hard. That's not to say that the work is any less difficult or hard if you choose another path. The point I guess I'm making is when you work with the bigs you will burn out and these projects are very time consuming.

Also like anything else... things change. Look at the world of Stop Motion. The most expensive form of animation was in vogue during the days of Nightmare Before Christmas and then fizzled... Now with the aid of studios like Lika it's back.

I agree 100% with your statement "If you can see yourself doing ANYTHING ELSE..."

One last point is any career regardless of if it is art, accounting, business management, etc. they all have high times and low times financially and personally. The key is to use those high points to save and grow in order to be ready for the lower points.
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:icondench:
Dench Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2013
The future of 2D is in videogames. We're seeing more beautifully animated side-scrollers.
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:iconsecoh2000:
secoh2000 Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
'There's nothing wrong with doing a "boring day job" if it pays the bills for your family and you stay up late doing your creative dream project.'

Haha, that's exactly where I'm at XD. Someday it would be nice to try to get into the art industry but for now my "horrible/boring day job" at least gives me a chance to practice art at night and to learn. Only downside is the lack of sleep.

Really great post; completely agree with your assessment of the situation and how things work. :)
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:iconmarkaaronbarrett:
markaaronbarrett Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013
Merely a heads up to any 2D animators out there, the casual games industry needs you.

I work at PopCap on Plants vs. Zombies 2. Our job is very fun, not that stressful, and has a LOT of room to grow. We are hiring right now. Other studios are too. It's not production animation but take a look at what the guys on Rayman Origins are doing. It's not production animation, but it is really hillarious, creative, and most importantly- 2D. We need great 2D animators now more than ever. A door closes, a window opens. Let me know if there is anything I can do to help anyone out there, send me an e-mail.

Good luck :)
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:icontombancroft:
tombancroft Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Professional Filmographer
Thanks for writing in Mark. This is very helpful and hopeful for all to hear. I can attest, most of my freelance last year (my day job was working on a TV series) was casual games artwork/character design. It was fun work and (turned out) right up my alley, even if I didn't know I had been trained for it.
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:iconberf:
berf Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013
The layoffs are all across the animation board. If anything there have been waaay more CG animation jobs lost. Dreamworks laid off 350 people, LucusArts closed, DigitalDomain closed it's new studio early this year, and of course lets not forget rhythm and hues going bankrupt shortly after life of PI. It's just the state of the industry right now. I'm a graduating senior at Ringling College of Art and Design and last week Dreamworks and BlueSky came to "interview" but really just told everyone that they have no jobs available. I think Sony said about the same thing. ReelFX and Laika seemed to be the only ones actually looking to hire people. Disney comes next week so that should be interesting.

2D won't die. A lot of 3D animation is actually roughed out in 2D first so the animators can really get that fleshy alive feel that you get with 2D. Plus most television cartoons are done in 2D still.

Also, thanks for the great explanation Tom! It makes a lot more sense now.
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:icontombancroft:
tombancroft Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2013  Professional Filmographer
Good luck with Disney when they come. They might need CG people right now, so I hope you find a spot. Thanks for your points, they are great!
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:iconberf:
berf Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2013
Thanks! I hope so too :D
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:iconddrsorastyle:
DDRSoraStyle Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2013  Student General Artist
Wow...this has been a very interesting read (especially for an animation student like me). I'm actually glad I read this because now it makes me think what I want to do with my life as an artist and etc. I hope Disney does pick up somehow because that was my dream job up until all this has been happening. definitely keeping in mind to study computer animation since thats where A LOT of animation is going to these days.
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:iconproject-epic:
project-epic Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2013  Student Filmographer
One thing i've never understood is why don't more creative people create their own "Studio". I'm sure most of you (talented) people have a friend that draws well and is in a place where you'd like to have your portfolio looked at.

If you created your own website and tested the waters until you could eventually fill the positions into a studio of your own or just get a steady flow of freelance work from the same clients then news like this wouldn't be such a blow.

At this point people have relied on the studios to fulfill their dreams by working in them but an even more ambitious person would choose to create their own dreams like Walt did.

I think that the bigest point that has finally reared its ugly head is that studios and even corporations have grown to be to big and it has hit everything on a larger scale. It's up to the NEW generation to come up with FUTURE projects.

Things are changing it's time to jump on board with newer endeavors and ideas, the internet is your tool.
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:iconiamkooi:
IamKooi Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2013   General Artist
Epic,

They do look at Lika. The problem is most creatives aren't business people. I've seen more than one creative business go under because the person(s) whom created it struggle with running a business and keeping there focus there when they really just want to create.

When you have someone else's livelihood your personal responsibility the stress gets high.

I've been a proponent of artist being part of a co-op or renting space in a creative environment as this allows the creative to be creative and handle small bits of business but let others do the heavy business lifting.
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:iconproject-epic:
project-epic Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013  Student Filmographer
I understand but listen what i'm trying to say is that people need to be enthusiastic about what types of things they can create.

Ryudan and Pacman "miniministudio" have done what i think more artists should do and over the course of time will benefit by gathering more of a portfolio for themselves.

Very cool ideas that could potentially lead to bigger and better things, stress is always high its about achieving that next goal. The internet is used as a gateway to expand peoples ideas i think it's about time for more people to get on board with this mindset.

Finding projects and opening up that gateway to get clients from different parts of the globe. America outsources a lot of work which is ridiculous just because we don't have institutions teaching younger artists how to draw the basic forms.

People are getting rich off of books "how to create manga" "how to draw the superhero pose", kids using really old books on anatomy that don't show how to use the body in different fields of animation or illustration or even caricature work.

If people came up with ideas just like imaginism to bust things up and open peoples minds then they can create their own small legion of fans that can propel themselves onto their next projects.

I think i'm just tired of hearing about Disney because they havent created something for a very long time that has been inspirational or challenging. It's been very safe and marketed heavily on specific age ranges because of the amount of financial responsibility.

People like Matthew Archambault are also benefiting off of the internet and have shown that you can be successful if you try.

I just see where the future is headed with bigger studios, they are creating a gap of (who can get you inside) and did you go to this school (Cal-Arts).

I could imagine that its a bit of a hit if you were a younger artists and you come across all of this information about lay-offs. But if that ONE young person knows or thinks that they could do more by not buying into the Disney machine then that ONE person could possibly do something different or even bigger for the artist community as a whole.

I just dont that ONE person to get discouraged because this world is really open to new ideas.
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:iconblakkfox:
BlakkFox Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Your post was an inspiring one. I've been reading through a lot of these comments, and most of them have just saddened me. Coming out of art school, I was expecting to at least get a steady job in the field; even if it didn't pay much. But with the economy as it is and all the studios just picking up and leaving, it's been pretty bleak.

But you know, you're right; the new medium is the internet. It's something that is very low-budget and can spread your work very quickly. I've been working on a few projects of my own- one, writing up a graphic novel with a number of artists that I've found through a forum. It has an IP attached to it, but maybe we can work out the business side of it if ever we get enough followers/fans willing to buy.

The forum we've made almost two years ago now has over 400 members, and it's great! Especially because the point of the forum is to tell stories through Roleplay. It's difficult enough to get teenagers to develop their writing skills, but we managed to make it fun and extremely engaging.
It's a project of passion for me; don't make anything off of it...but it has opened doors to me that weren't there before.
Very talented artists/writers have been drawn to it and work there now, which are now friends and valuable professional contacts. And writing/working plot constantly is something that has honed my storytelling skills as an animator/graphic novelist.

Studios have proven that they aren't interested in keeping artists for the long term, so we have to find ways to keep ourselves afloat any way we can. I have no illusions about becoming like Walt Disney or anything; I just want to keep the artist community close-knit. We have to help each other in any way we can.
I think people tend to lose sight of the ART in the tough aspect of finding work/needing to pay bills.
I know I have a few times.
There's plenty of adversarial people out there concerning art as a career. It's been the hardest thing in my life to do; pursue a career in animation/illustration. Hell, I could have gone to school for a year, paid a tiny bit of money for an associates to be a nurse or dental assistant and be making good money by now.
Instead, I went to school for six years, paid $80 grand for a BA in animation, and I'm still working minimum wage.
But it's all I've wanted to do, and hell if I'm going to let other people dictate what I can or can't do in life.
And I certainly won't allow something as ridiculous as money dictate that.
Besides, I got exactly what I wanted from going to school. Before I was there, I felt like art was a thing that I didn't know much about, and occasionally played with to make a pretty picture.
Now, it's a tool that I know how to use well and can work with to tell stories. The knowledge was truly priceless.

If ever people go into art, they have to do it because they love it; not because they want to make money.
It's not difficult making money at all, if you don't care what you do for it.
The reason it's hard to make money as an artist is because of the poor way businesses are managed here.
You would think that business people would make smart decisions on handling millions of dollars...but they don't. They think short term and with greed in mind.
It's why you see so many studios falling flat. Most of their funding isn't well-spent, and they end up blaming the artists for it, or the medium.
That's why we need artists that are business savvy- they'll have the right things in mind.
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:iconiamkooi:
IamKooi Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2013   General Artist
I agree 100%
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:iconmmkaay:
Mmkaay Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2013  Student Digital Artist
And this is why I have decided to never base my career around art! I'll base half of my life around it though. :3
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:iconphoenixsalover:
PhoenixSAlover Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2013   Digital Artist
PS: I always dreamed to work in Disney animation...but what you saidd did make me wake up for some possibilities to fail to my dreams...no biggy theres will be other animations to open xD Disney isnt the only production to make cartoons, I believe in that :D
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:iconphoenixsalover:
PhoenixSAlover Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2013   Digital Artist
I agree...we must grab jobs that we can....crise can spread everywhere ..so we must be prepared :) I'm planing to finish my 3D course desigh then drawing..after that it's 2 professions in hand...If I have to work out of those areas...I dont have choice till I get right job for what I've been fighting for ;)

I will have drawing/arquitecture/3D...if an one of them come to my hands....Ill be working on a supermarket temporaly xD
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:iconmelliebels:
MellieBels Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2013  Professional Filmographer
Very interesting. Your journals are always very informative.
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:iconmohegan567:
Mohegan567 Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2013  Professional Filmographer
I actually find it sad that John Lassiter is now the boss of such a big studio (I'm not sure what the right description for his job is now). But when he was 'only' the creative head of the studio he probably had much more time to focus on a single project. Now that he has more pressure on his shoulders I can understand why a dud like Cars 2 was created. He simply doesn't have the time to make every project a great thing.

It always happens to studios who start out small, have succes, and suddenly turn into a profitable big time studio. They lose the things that makes them great, just because business rears it's ugly head. While it is understandable, it's also quiet sad. I actually find it worrisome that Pixar is creating so many sequels nowadays. While the Toy Story trilogy is wonderful, I really can't see how a sequel to Finding Nemo or Monsters Inc could be great. :/

I'm not bashing Pixar, my english is not perfect, so I can't find the correct words to describe my opinion. But I'm not very happy with their future projects.
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:icondasutobani:
Dasutobani Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2013  Professional Filmographer
I always kind of figured. But I think there's still a new wave of fledglings out there chomping at the bit to be the next Termite Terrace, or Fuzzy Door Productions, we just lack the funding and business knowhow to channel all the creative energy. And college has been kind of holding back most would be "animators" in that respect. Focusing on "what's the next tech trend" and teaching that, rather than solid fundamentals, and the business end of things.

I'm actually glad I got some 2D fundamentals under my belt, though. Useful skill for seeing and interpreting motion, instead of relying on the computer to fill in the blanks. And sometimes it's just faster for getting the point across.
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:iconklarkkentthe3rd:
KlarkKentThe3rd Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2013
Informative.
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:iconlionkingrulez:
LionKingRulez Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2013  Student Digital Artist
Instead of complaning about 2D animation going away, we should cherish the the films we have now. We are humans, we can adapt to change, we may hate it, but it doesn't mean hand drawn animation is lost forever.
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:iconmisskokamon:
MissKokamon Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2013  Professional
I'm an animator, and the recent layoffs in both the game industry and the film industry have had me wondering if I'd ever manage to work at my dream company, working on projects that are deeper than animated game assets. But your journal is completely true, Tom, and it serves as a reminder that while doors in the industry are always closing, there are doors always opening as well. It may be a frightening time for students and those of us without a solid footing in this field, but things should soon settle and new opportunities will spring up.
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April 12, 2013
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