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Every day the sea level gets a little higher, and every day we have a little bit less water to drink.


According to the World Wildlife Fund, 2.7 billion people are faced with water scarcities during at least one month of the year. As drought conditions prevail in many places around the globe and our limited supply of accessible fresh water continues to dwindle, the problem is getting worse, not better.


A global water crisis — a scenario in which there simply isn’t enough potable water to sustain the world’s needs — is the most significant global risk we face on Earth in terms of its potential impact on the population. Of all potential global crises, a water crisis is the eight most likely to occur in a ten year period, according to an assessment by the World Economic Forum in January.


All this is to say that the world’s water problems need to be solved sooner rather than later. It’s a tragedy in its own right that 2.4 billion people worldwide don’t have steady access to water that is sufficiently sanitary — meaning they are exposed to a host of water-borne illnesses, which often prove deadly. But soon this will be everyone else’s problem too.



In terms of the shortage, desalinating seawater seems, at first, like an attractive option.


We know that converting seawater into fresh water is a viable way to create potable H2O, but that process is hugely expensive in many ways. The amount of electricity needed as well as the potential impact of a desalination plant on the ocean environment it pumps water from both present major flaws in this solution. Given the costliness of the process, places that have used desalination as a stop-gap to produce water during intense droughts, such as in California and Australia, often end up shuttering the plants when normal rain conditions resume.
















For what it’s worth, we know that the effects of global warming and global water shortages are related.


The rising sea levels mean that coastal locations without much land between fresh and saltwater bodies risk cross-contamination, rendering the freshwater saline and thus undrinkable. In addition, many scientists speculate that global warming is causing and will continue to cause extreme weather conditions — that includes harsh droughts.


Prospects seem bleak, and no self-evident solution has presented itself.


But consider this: In the US, California is suffering one of its worst droughts on record right now. As the state continues hemorrhaging fresh water, its supply isn’t being replenished at a sustainable rate. To try and curb the effects of the drought, the governor of California has put significant water restrictions in place. During the coverage of these restrictions, a troubling statistic emerged. In California, “outdoor residential use” accounts for one-third of all Urban water consumption. In other words, lawn and garden sprinklers are using a third of the water in California’s cities. That’s a number that should cause your face to flush red, considering how obscenely simple it would be to simply stop allowing people to water their lawns.



This is especially true in Southern California, where rainfall is so scarce that residential lawns must be planted using turf, because the various species of grass found on lawns do not grow naturally there. Incentive programs exist for homeowners to replace their lawns with water-storing plants that are native to the region.


This problem is more pressing than having a nice-looking lawn whether we choose to acknowledge that fact or not. Right now, most of us think about water scarcity as happening somewhere else, being someone else’s problem. But when you juxtapose a lawn sprinkler in California with the millions of people who lack access to clean water all over the world, this problem becomes illuminated in a global context.


A ban on lawn sprinklers isn’t going to solve the world’s water problems — not even close. The fact that turning sprinklers off could alleviate an entire third of urban water consumption in California makes you wonder what other simple conservation steps we could take with a little bit of creative thinking. Beyond that, there are ways we can help people without access to clean water right now. The impetus take this simple step exists already, and every day it becomes a little more urgent. How much more water could be saved?


















Your Thoughts


  1. Do you incorporate any water-saving techniques in your day-to-day life? If so, we’d love to hear what they are!
  2. In your opinion, which is a more effective strategy for dealing with resource shortages on Earth: creating solutions through conservation and renewal, or exploring other potential homes for our species throughout the universe?
  3. One solution to water woes used in different regions worldwide are so-called “rain taxes” that charges building owners for excess rainwater. What’s the water situation like where you’re at? Are there any special restrictions or preventative steps being taken to regulate usage?













Every day the sea level gets a little higher, and every day we have a little bit less water to drink. According to the World Wildlife Fund, 2.7 billion people are faced with water scarcities during at least one month of the year. As drought conditions prevail in many places around the globe and our limited supply of accessible fresh water continues to dwindle, the problem is getting worse, not better.

Author: eawood
Curator: ellenherbert
Designer: seoul-child

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:iconrds98:
rds98 Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2015
I live in the New York area. We haven't had rain in weeks, and its taking a toll on the garden. I wonder how long before we start using desalination to get most of our water. I'll tell right now California isn't the only place facing crisis.
Reply
:iconarmageddongal:
armageddongal Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I am happy that someone is posting a concern here about water. Water is vital. And it hard to get some people to change. I for one have reduced my water waste. I take less time I the shower. And when I shampoo I turn of the water. Also we don't need to wash our hair daily. So same water there. Also I think population , poverty and ignorant people are making things worst. Education is vital. And population control. My idea is that our society. And I'm taking about America are supporting (sorry to say this ) useless people who do not care about their planet. Honestly earth is and will always be our home. We need to educate others. Save our home. Be less selfish.
Reply
:iconjacac:
JACAC Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2015
a . B I G . p r o b l e m . f o r . s u r e ...
Reply
:iconrsf24:
RSF24 Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2015  Professional Traditional Artist
FYI, Texas drought is pretty much over. Most reservoirs are at 95% capacity.
www.srh.noaa.gov/fwd/?n=drough…
Reply
:iconleonartisan:
Leonartisan Featured By Owner May 3, 2015  Student General Artist
Its called reverse osmosis. Its a suppressed technology that turn salt water into pure water fit for drinking. Also Bill Gates has successfully invested money in technology that would turn sewage into pure clean drinking water. The water shouldn't be running out. Even with landlocked countries, simple viaducts can be built. This is not about global warming (its cooling now) or pollution, its about rapidly growing 3rd world populations that are being ignored by the societal world elite.
Reply
:iconfellfallow:
FellFallow Featured By Owner Edited May 3, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
As harsh as it sounds there are only so many people the earth can support - as well as animals. Those that die out due to disease or famine are being subject to the natural order of things. Of course we have limited medicine and food available, but the fact is the earth is already overpopulated - without a 'natural control' our numbers will continue to exceed that. If that happens, everyone will suffer. You cannot change nature to your specific liking and still have a balanced ecosystem - and yes, humans are part of that ecosystem and must abide by it's rules like any other animal. 

Having said that I don't know why desalination plants are more popular. The notion that water is 'running out' is completely ignorant and plain ridiculous - water doesn't disappear from the atmosphere, it simply cycles. Water -> into animal -> into ground -> clouds -> rain -> water. I'd be interested to know where you think it's going off to. 
Reply
:iconkrateros101:
Krateros101 Featured By Owner Edited May 1, 2015
Listen, even if you pulled out all the stops and actually found the capital to implement your favorite tech solution to the water problem, you would still be faced with the plethora of other scarcities and pending scarcities out there. 

Overpopulation and consumption are the root problems here, and these are the product of the techno-industrial fossil fuel blip in history that the last 150+ years have been.  We are in the twilight part of that chapter of history.

We are projected to add trillions more people to the earth.  And we "hope" to have a larger total percentage in the middle class.  Which means the rate of growth in consumption would increase even faster.

The only real solution is collapse.  Sorry to say that.  We're already in the early stages of it.  The future is going to be very interesting, and VERY different than most people expect.
Reply
:icondreamingartist101:
Dreamingartist101 Featured By Owner May 1, 2015  Student Traditional Artist
Well, of course rainfall is rare in So. Cal! It's a desert for crying out loud! 
Reply
:iconsnowblindotter:
SnowblindOtter Featured By Owner May 1, 2015
WWF is for wildlife, so, I'm not trusting their estimates on people.

Water problems? No, it's a government problem. Stop funding bank accounts, start funding desalinization research, and suddenly no more water problem!
Reply
:iconkrateros101:
Krateros101 Featured By Owner Edited May 1, 2015
Listen, even if you pulled out all the stops and actually found the capital to implement your favorite tech solution to the water problem, you would still be faced with the plethora of other scarcities and pending scarcities out there. 

Overpopulation and consumption are the root problems here, and these are the product of the techno-industrial fossil fuel blip in history that the last 150+ years have been.  We are in the twilight part of that chapter of history.

We are projected to add trillions more people to the earth.  And we "hope" to have a larger total percentage in the middle class.  Which means the rate of growth in consumption would increase even faster.

The only real solution is collapse.  Sorry to say that.  We're already in the early stages of it.  The future is going to be very interesting, and VERY different than most people expect.
Reply
:iconsnowblindotter:
SnowblindOtter Featured By Owner May 3, 2015
You're right about the collapse, bit.
Reply
:iconkrateros101:
Krateros101 Featured By Owner May 3, 2015
Everything else, the various "solutions" everyone talks about, seem more like patches than anything.  Buying a bit more time maybe.  But the longer the current state of things goes, the bigger everything gets, making the collapse even more calamitous than if it happened now, or twenty years ago.
Reply
:iconsnowblindotter:
SnowblindOtter Featured By Owner May 3, 2015
I completely agree. I mean, Hitler had something going... he just wasn't general enough.
Reply
:iconkrateros101:
Krateros101 Featured By Owner May 3, 2015
I definitely think we are in store for a pretty dramatic population collapse as well this century.  Maybe before mid-century.  Maybe some genocides, war in general, increased famine, disease--all will contribute, I bet. 

And the USA will certainly not be immune.  Actually the USA is the epicenter of the problem, especially economically.  This country has a shit storm coming, and no one seems to recognize it, or care, or be prepared.
Reply
:iconsnowblindotter:
SnowblindOtter Featured By Owner May 3, 2015
Eh, I'm not worried about it. I'm too close to the poverty line to care, honestly
Reply
:iconpoochypaws:
PoochyPaws Featured By Owner May 1, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
1. Yes, personally I turn off the water while brushing my teeth. I also
make sure the "leaky" faucet handles are always turned off properly.
I even use old water (unfinished) bottles and pour the remaining water in a few garden plants.
 
2. Create solutions. I kinda see it as "running away" from the issue if you
just try to leave Earth. Why? Because we can still explore Space for the human race AND have the world we originated from also.

3. Yeah, they're some water restrictions locally for me. Why should we be
charged extra money for taking care of our Lawns and Gardens?
After all
California is a big Agriculture state.

This topic is about my home State. I am a bit confused, I thought
some other States were having Floods??? Then why are we (here in CA)
suffering from awful droughts?
Don't forget, us Humans are made up of a % of Water.

:peace:
Reply
:iconsnowblindotter:
SnowblindOtter Featured By Owner May 1, 2015
We're also a coastal state, who's governor refuses to fund desalinization research, in lieu of lining his pocket and fighting tobacco and firearms.
Reply
:iconpoochypaws:
PoochyPaws Featured By Owner May 1, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Tobacco is the worse #1 killer, so I can't ever disagree with that.
Reply
:iconsnowblindotter:
SnowblindOtter Featured By Owner May 3, 2015
Pretty sure I've never seen a cigarette jump up on its own volition and shoot somebody. And, frankly, if Tobacco is a killer, then, more power to it. It's called natural selection.
Reply
:iconsorross:
Sorross Featured By Owner May 2, 2015
Alcohol is the #1 killer
Reply
:iconfrekkle:
Frekkle Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
If people ate less animal products, then all this water wouldn't be wasted on farm animals. 
Reply
:iconarmageddongal:
armageddongal Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
But don't we need the nutrients from animals? I understand eating less cows. Since cow require a lot of energy pull.
What type of meat is best to try to help reduce water waste?
Reply
:iconsnowblindotter:
SnowblindOtter Featured By Owner May 1, 2015
Well, yeah. The less people you have eating meat, the less water is needed for livestock. On the same token, though, if more people become vegetarian, or vegan, then more water is going toward agriculture, so, it's still diverting a ludicrous amount of water toward farming food for a bunch of idiots.

If you really want to conserve water in terms of food, go Breatharian. It's a great way to conserve water, and help solve the hunger crisis while you're at it.
Reply
:iconfrekkle:
Frekkle Featured By Owner Edited May 2, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
I think starving yourself creates a hunger crisis in itself, though. BUT if we all died then the Earth would be saved! Our God is an Awesome God 
Reply
:iconsnowblindotter:
SnowblindOtter Featured By Owner May 3, 2015
:shrug: Starving onesself just creates a hunger crisis for them. I'm perfectly content eating a larger meal because somebody else wants to starve themselves. Honestly, though, I highly doubt killing the entire population of humanity is going to 'save the Earth'. I'm not worried about saving the planet.

:icongeorgecarlinplz: The planet is just fine. It's the people that are fucked. The planet's been around for 4 and a half billion years, it ain't going anywhere. We are.
Reply
:iconkrateros101:
Krateros101 Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2015
There are many resources running into scarcities.  Water among them.  Cheap fossil fuels is another.  This is the logical end result of exponential population growth and exponential growth in consumption. 

There is one solution to this problem.  It's not what most people probably think, or certainly hope for.  It is, namely, Collapse.  There will be a collapse, and a reset.  It won't be the end of humanity or civilization.  But it will be very difficult and traumatic and destructive.
Reply
:iconlenlenlen1:
lenlenlen1 Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2015  Professional General Artist
Countries that don't have clean drinking water never invested in creating an infrastructure to have it. If you create the infrastructure (plants, dams, tunnels, wells, etc.) then you would have the clean water and they could be maintained through modest taxation. Build an infrastructure and everything else will come. Leave most of your country at the rural stage and you'll have nothing. People have built entire cities in the middle of deserts: Las Vegas, Abu Dhabi, etc...

1) The best water saving technique is simply not to be wasteful. Turn off your faucet when you're not using it, don't water your lawn more than you absolutely have to. In some regions don't water your lawn at all. Just don't be an absent minded pig.

2) a combination of all strategies is best. No one thing will work everywhere.

3) Rain tax is ridiculous. Try that crap in the U.S. and there'll be revolution!
Reply
:iconsnowblindotter:
Two states have Rain Taxes, and a man in Oregon was jailed for collecting rainwater.
Reply
:iconlenlenlen1:
lenlenlen1 Featured By Owner May 5, 2015  Professional General Artist
Well... there should be a revolution!
Reply
:iconkl4pp5tuhl:
Kl4pp5tuhl Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2015
<rant>

Here's an idea: STOP BUYING/USING CARS.

Not even joking, you think environmental factors will get better with electric cars? What about recycling those old batteries that will pile up?

Just build a more reasonable infrastructure to allow for better public transportation, use streets as bike lanes, and reserve actual electric/hydrogen cars for police/firefighters/rescue workers!

And stop using planes, use Airships instead! I mean why not? Just cause they aren't fast? Because new Airships ARE fast. Crashes wouldn't be as catastrophic either!

And stop using fossil fuel ships to transport cargo! Force them to use hydrogen and sails! Yes, sails!

Start making toys out of wood again, how about that? With better and more detailed 3D CNC routers than ever, why not? We could save so much oil for pharmaceuticals if we stop using plastic for toys!

</rant>

I could go on, but I got to stop here. It's pointless to rant, isn't it? Things never change for the better. Am I too unrealistic, maybe. But god-damned, we gotta try to change the way things are for the better as fast as possible.
Reply
:iconsnowblindotter:
SnowblindOtter Featured By Owner May 1, 2015
Counterarguments for your rant:

:bulletblack: Money

:bulletblack: Politics

:bulletblack: Politics, and money.

:bulletblack: Politics.

:bulletblack: Deforestation.
Reply
:iconkl4pp5tuhl:
Kl4pp5tuhl Featured By Owner May 2, 2015
Yup, pretty much why it's pointless to rant.
Reply
:iconlenlenlen1:
lenlenlen1 Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2015  Professional General Artist
Agreed about public transportation. Its necessary!
Reply
:iconkl4pp5tuhl:
Kl4pp5tuhl Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2015
Sure is! Works aces in my town, 30 minutes and I'm from one end of the city to the other, or everywhere inbetween! We've cut our military spending down to the lowest level ever. If you're in the army, you get minimum wage at best. Know where the money went into instead? Education, Medical Care, Infrastructure, where it's needed!
Reply
:iconlenlenlen1:
lenlenlen1 Featured By Owner May 1, 2015  Professional General Artist
Well I certainly don't want our soldiers to get shafted in the process. There has to be a better way than that.

But definitely this country needs to increase its public transportation options so that we can cut down on the amount of cars that each family absolutely needs to have. When I lived in NYC I didn't need a car and I used public transportation. It was great, and for how much people complain about the fares its still comparatively cheap. Where I am now, I absolutely need a car, even if only to go buy a bag of potato chips.
Reply
:iconrachelcp17:
rachelcp17 Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
I know I'm not familiar with the process of desalination so please correct me but I don't understand why they cant separate the water from the salt through condensation or whatever and then purify the salt and purify the water then sell the salt as either table salt or a sea salt scrub or something and give the water where its needed then send the left over muck to a sewage treatment plant or something I know it requires energy but we could always use a combination of renewable energy sources I thought that this combined with water conservation and not using drinkable water for gardening/washing clothes/toilets etc that it could be done long term
please someone qualified that knows more about the process respond
Reply
:iconsnowblindotter:
SnowblindOtter Featured By Owner May 1, 2015
There's really nobody qualified, since none of the world governments fund the research.
Reply
:iconrachelcp17:
rachelcp17 Featured By Owner Edited May 1, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
thanks its just I hear all the time that sea water --> clean water +salt+muck isn't a viable long term option and I want to hear from whoever started that statement or agrees with that statement really I just want further clarification and reasoning as to why they believe that obviously the only problem it will solve is the water shortage and there are numerous other problems to solve but the people that say it won't solve the water shortage why wont it? who told you it wont? were they qualified or were they just saying whatever they thought seemed right? (like me) it takes energy but aaaall mass production takes energy and as long as you use the salt and muck instead of just dumping it back into the ocean i dont know what the other problems with this?

After doing further research ive found a few places that do exactly this I've heard before about factories that take the fresh water through osmosis and dump the rest increasing the salinity  and concentration of pollution etc of ocean water but I finally found some that use the by products of it as well
www.ugr.es/~iagua/LICOM_archiv…
www.vorsana.com/images/Electro…
www.veoliawaterst.co.za/munici…

(incase you or others are curious about the hidden comment its the second paragraph i decided to edit the post and add the second comment to it rather than have 2 comments and out of order)
Reply
:iconlislebob:
Lislebob Featured By Owner Edited Apr 29, 2015
It's easy. First, get a bowl. Second, place salt water in the bowl(half). Third, add cup inside the bowl(make sure no salt water went inside). Fourth, add plastic cover on top. Make sure there is heat to evaporate the salt water. When salt water evaporates, the clear water will separate from salt. The cup would catch the clear water so it won't go back on the salt water. Another solution is rain(similar to evaporation).
Reply
:iconjessomie:
jessomie Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
commercial agriculture is the biggest user of fresh water, particularly the production of animals and the widespread use of highly simplified farming systems. we need better farming systems on a smaller scale that use resources (including water!) more economically and actually care about the land they work and the food they produce
governments and international companies arent exactly broadcasting this because the food system makes a lotta moneys. still, we should ALL be working to save resources wherever possible
Reply
:iconheliotropicsquirrel:
Heliotropicsquirrel Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2015
Just like we ran out of oil!  ;P

LMAO.
Reply
:iconcharlesammich:
charlesammich Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Wait, okay, so, if the water cycle is-A CYCLE-then it should never end....so water would continue to go from rivers and stuff into the ocean, evaporate, turn into clouds, rain over land and into rivers and lakes, rinse and repeat. So, yeah, we'll never run out of freshwater, but we could run out of groundwater specifically....
Reply
:iconartrefugium:
ArTRefugiuM Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2015   Traditional Artist
Well if someone would stop Nestle from bottleing water even in the desert and selling it for maximum profit then this would probably have an end, yeah!
Besides that ... We can do pipelines for oil and gas over the whole planet but not bring a single drop of water into a desert? What's wrong with mankind, really...
Reply
:iconsnowblindotter:
SnowblindOtter Featured By Owner May 1, 2015
This. This, so hard. XD

Then, of course, we can spend billions a year on oil refining, but, not on desalinization?
Reply
:iconartrefugium:
ArTRefugiuM Featured By Owner May 1, 2015   Traditional Artist
Exactly, this is what I mean.
Reply
:iconkrateros101:
Krateros101 Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2015
Well, there are many deserts that are simply overpopulated, with their natural carrying capacities WAY exceeded.  Look at parts of the Southwest USA, or Saudi Arabia and parts of the Middle East.  And these populations continue to grow, propped up by the unique conditions of the 20th and early 21st centuries.  These conditions are winding down now, as growing scarcities resulting from modern exponential population and consumption growth are really starting to kick in. 

A collapse of varying magnitude will occur everywhere, with these desert regions being canaries in the coal mine.  This was a big part of the various revolts and revolutions in the Middle East over the past 5 years.
Reply
:iconcringeking:
CringeKing Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
tl:dr

Water crisis? I don't think so. All the things we drink end up back in the sea, or in this case, water purification.
I may sound ignorant saying this so bluntly, but I'm just speaking out my opinion on this matter...
Reply
:icon30sqm:
30sqm Featured By Owner Edited Apr 25, 2015
I recently saw on this website a string cartoon which rather well depicted that nature is adaptable ..and the earth will survive,  But what we (mankind / industrialisation) are doing is to make this planet uninhabitable for our species.!  In my opinion - that's worth thinking about.  

The effects of global population growth, power extravagance, consumer consumption, and waste - has, at some point to reach a level where it is no longer sustainable.  University professors, researchers, scientists, Government studies, Institutes of all kinds, farmers, marine biologists, Greenpeace and a host of other world crisis organisations are SHOUTING - "we are coming off the rails" /  "really fast approaching that point of no return guys !"   An analogy : Once an ancient forest burns, it takes that long again to recover. 

Only industry and commerce are denying it ...as strongly as the cigarette industry once fought to defend their profits.  That said there are many who are either recognising the facts or at least bowing to public demand : One such petroleum company - BP (British Petrolium) changed it's name to BP (Beyond Petroleum).

Bar-stool philosophers only repeat hearsay, and rarely actually study (to any depth) both sides of an argument. So personally I've learnt to take their opinions at only face value. There may be truths in there somewhere, but from their seats - they are not the source nor even a balanced argument. 

Conversely, farmers learnt centuries ago - that any field could sustain only a limited amount of agriculture. Then the land had to rest. Nowadays that rest is not enough, the land has to be fed and watered - constantly.  But then also defended against disease, blight and plague, that not long ago were dealt with by nature and long icy winters... Now the pests survive in escalating numbers.  Your planet earth is that field.

And whereas farmlands sustained their rural communities, the growth of cities overtook the farm lands and consumed the water. So the population brought in food & water in from further and further, and then even further afield. Now that food comes in by the ship load. 

It's rather ironic ; that you pay farmers and businessmen - in countries you don't call friendly, for the food & clothes, electrical & other consumer goods they produce.!  And that you buy oil and industry's raw materials from peoples you really do not trust !  Doesn't that make your life / your county just a little vulnerable.?  Tell me is that situation is getting any better ?... with Politics, Billion dollar economics, and Religious influences all in play.

Case in point : Britain just a few years ago was held to ransom by a foreign country, simply because a gas pipeline passed through their territory. This is not fiction, nor is it even futuristic.. This is now.

Those who look now - will see that a massive industrial revolution is sweeping through China and other former 3rd-world countries. Their power needs and steel consumption has sky rocketed.  And with new-found wealth in those communities - the population explodes. As does the consumer consumption they (as we all do) aspire to. 

As the natural resources of this tiny planet are being strip-mined, we will learn that 'for every action - there is an equal & opposite reaction'.  Tidal surges, weather anomalies happening all around the world, skin & other cancers, and infectious diseases crossing international borders- are just a polite warning.! 

Scaremongery or severe hurricane warning ?  why not just look away.?  or else you could look further - unless of course you're so uck'g clever.. to pooh, pooh those with the very best education, training, experience & resources, to actually research and study what's happening - over a long period of time.? 

Water sprinklers in California are just a local matter between those who have and those who don't, but that's just one tree you're looking at !

.

p.s. well done guys for a great presentation and for bringing this matter to our Deviant minds ;)

1. Water butts filled from roofing downpipes.., and letting nature have an hand in my gardening ! But water shortage is just one symptom of the bigger issues, so also LPG conversion on the car, pro-active recycling, energy awareness in the home... and I'm considering solar panels on the roof.
2. Both..  Unless a virus wipes out half the world's population - we'll have no choice but to start searching for alternative planet(s) for future generations. With the distances being so great and the logistics of travel spanning decades - the 'ships' will have to be huge enough to maintain their own ecology and power supply (even when away from solar).  And it needs to happen soon. Yet those first explorers will start off with one-way tickets to nowhere.
3. this is the driest / mildest winter I can ever remember.  And I'm an old fart now !   Despite this one year.. warmer winters are a noticed trend in my and my friends (around the world) lifetimes.
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