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SakuraSeries PS Brushes by AFireSmothered SakuraSeries PS Brushes :iconafiresmothered:AFireSmothered 932 111 Learn some Japanese Words by loitumachan Learn some Japanese Words :iconloitumachan:loitumachan 250 78
Literature
Text: Basic Phrases
おはようございます
おはよう
Ohayou gozaimasu / ohayou
Good morning (formal) / 'Morning (informal)
Often said until 11 AM
こんにちは
Konnichiwa
Good afternoon
Often said from about 11 AM to 6 PM
こんばんは
Konbanwa
Good evening
Often said from about 6 PM and on
さようなら / じゃね、また / またね / バイバイ
Sayounara / ja ne, mata / mata ne / baibai
Good bye (formal) / Well, see you later (informal) / See you later (informal) / Bye bye (informal)
おやすみなさい / おやすみ
Oyasumi nasai / Oyasumi
Good night (formal) / 'Night (informal)
Said only when going to bed.
どうもありがとうございます
Doumo arigatou
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Japanese language level BEGINNER by TheFlagandAnthemGuy Japanese language level BEGINNER :icontheflagandanthemguy:TheFlagandAnthemGuy 446 166 Sushi Cat- Fancy Feast by BlueBirdie Sushi Cat- Fancy Feast :iconbluebirdie:BlueBirdie 525 52 Mochi Panda Stickers by MoogleGurl Mochi Panda Stickers :iconmooglegurl:MoogleGurl 506 68 Airy Sakura by Raindropmemory Airy Sakura :iconraindropmemory:Raindropmemory 263 29 Japanese language level INTERMEDIATE by TheFlagandAnthemGuy Japanese language level INTERMEDIATE :icontheflagandanthemguy:TheFlagandAnthemGuy 112 33
Literature
Text: Koko, Soko, Asoko, Doko
ここ、 そこ、 あそこ、 どこ
koko, soko, asoko, doko
Try not to confuse this group with the other two 'ko, so, a, do' groups. These words are used for places. They do, however, follow the same pattern as the other two as seen below:
ここ (koko) means 'here' and is used for places near the speaker.
がっこうはここです。
Gakkou wa koko desu.
The school is here.
そこ (soko) means 'there' and is used for places near the recipient.
ぎんこうはそこです。
Ginkou wa soko desu.
The bank is there.
あそこ (asoko) means 'over there' and is used for places far from both the speaker and the recipient.
おてらはあそこです。
Otera wa asoko desu.
The temple is over there.
どこ (doko) means 'where' and has
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K-on by Renevatia K-on :iconrenevatia:Renevatia 539 19 I'm Learning Japanese - Stamp by Natsu714 I'm Learning Japanese - Stamp :iconnatsu714:Natsu714 234 74 Writing In Japanese- Lesson 00 by emm2341 Writing In Japanese- Lesson 00 :iconemm2341:emm2341 229 23 Keyboards in Japan by DJKneo Keyboards in Japan :icondjkneo:DJKneo 231 96 hetalia: nihon by reijr hetalia: nihon :iconreijr:reijr 616 25 Japanese language level NATIVE by TheFlagandAnthemGuy Japanese language level NATIVE :icontheflagandanthemguy:TheFlagandAnthemGuy 61 41 Japanese Kanji Table- Fish by theblindalley Japanese Kanji Table- Fish :icontheblindalley:theblindalley 67 27 Charm Commissions: set1 by MoogleGurl Charm Commissions: set1 :iconmooglegurl:MoogleGurl 269 112 Writing Japanese- Lesson 2 by emm2341 Writing Japanese- Lesson 2 :iconemm2341:emm2341 269 56 Writing Japanese- Lesson 9 by emm2341 Writing Japanese- Lesson 9 :iconemm2341:emm2341 101 45 Fish Eye Makeup by Burite Fish Eye Makeup :iconburite:Burite 412 41 Random Shadilver Comic by xShadilverx Random Shadilver Comic :iconxshadilverx:xShadilverx 184 174 Writing Japanese- Lesson 5 by emm2341 Writing Japanese- Lesson 5 :iconemm2341:emm2341 202 20 No Fear for Kanji by emm2341 No Fear for Kanji :iconemm2341:emm2341 99 61
Literature
Text: Basic Sentence Structure
x は y です .
x wa y desu.
This is the (most) basic sentence structure you will probably see. The "x" in that sentence is the subject of the sentence. "は/wa" is a particle which marks the subject of the sentence. Notice how the hiragana "ha" is used instead of the hiragana "wa". This won't be the only time a particle does something similar (I'll go more into particles at a later time). But please remember to write "ha" but pronounce "wa". The "y" in that sentence is most often the object of the sentence. "Desu" is the verb of the sentence that means "is/am/are" depending on the sentence.
Now, you might be wondering "why is the verb at the end of the sentence?" Well, the simplest answer is that the Japanese have a different sentence structure than we use in English. Verbs will always go at the end of the sentence (of course there are exceptions, but that's more advance, for now, just focus on this.) The good news is that the verbs will always stay the same no ma
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