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Tylosaurus pembinensis

By Swordlord3d
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Tylosaurus model for Meld Media and Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum.

Textured by Andrey Atuchin.
Image details
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1900x950px 771.56 KB
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© 2015 - 2021 Swordlord3d
Comments42
anonymous's avatar
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SpikeArt109's avatar
D3dRam's avatar

Marine reptiles are so cool, Good job man.

Leo-Alexander's avatar
Amazing--goes without saying.  Where did the inspiration for the texture on the fins come from?  It reminds me of leatherback shells; or are there skin impressions?
Isaacmegalodon's avatar
Was Pemibinesis larger than Proriger? I am incredibly interested with this.
Isaac
sawnikheoghehg's avatar
awesome! i love the color of it, it makes it look like a varanid
MichaelJohnMorris's avatar
That thing is epic! :D
Swordlord3d's avatar
Not B/W but very dark or probably counter-shaded with dark spine and lighter belly. And it is:
cdna2.artstation.com/p/assets/…

At the same time I don't think we can extrapolate those data to all other marine reptiles in general. 
Swordlord3d's avatar
What do you mean by "for sure"? )) It was dark. Dark can be different: greenish, bluish etc.
Again, here is the model and it's almost grey: cdna2.artstation.com/p/assets/…

Have you heard anything about lighting, reflections and transparency? =) If you haven't then... OMG! Look! Green elephant and blue hippo! Catch them!!!
cdn1.arkive.org/media/47/47A4C…
i.ytimg.com/vi/guACeVYUp7M/max…
Illilex0DarkFire's avatar
Were their tails like that? i thought they were more paddle like like a crocodile's.
dolphin-xht's avatar
Yup~~ New materials have shown that these things have small tail flukes similar to white-tip reef sharks or primitive ichthyosaurs. The swimming posture of these sea lizards, therefore, would be more akin to say a sturgeon than a crocodile or their modern relatives.

phys.org/news/2013-09-mosasaur…
Illilex0DarkFire's avatar
So a slow swimmer most of the time, just minding its own business. That is how I picture a sturgeon swimming. But what is the difference? both of the species move their tails back and forth.
dolphin-xht's avatar
And to avoid misunderstanding, I'm not saying crocodiles and eels cannot be fast, I am saying they have low cruising speed and they cannot sustain their burst of speed for a long time. The polar opposite in this spectrum would be tunas, while requiem sharks and sturgeons sit in the middle somewhere closer to the slow end.

lyle.smu.edu/propulsion/Pages/…
dolphin-xht's avatar
The eel-like swimming posture is more manoeuvrable and more stable, while that of a reef-shark would be stiffer, faster yet less manoeuvrable, therefore allowing/forcing a more active life style. Sturgeons and many sharks are not fast creatures, but they are far more active than eels and crocodiles, whose speed is so slow and could sustain so limited burst of speed that they can only be a sit-and-wait kind of ambush predator. If you want something larger and more predatory as an analogy for "typical" mosasaurs, a good reference would be bluntnose sixgill shark, tiger shark or kaluga, which often catches prey by dashing for a short distance say proximately 3 to 4 times their own body length. And of course we have Plotosaurus, which is a totally different design.
Illilex0DarkFire's avatar
Okay. Thank you very much for clarifying.
ChrisM199's avatar
it does look like concept art for Dinosaur revolution
PeteDRaptor's avatar
That's very impressive you just did.
aujourdhuidemain's avatar
Amazing, Thanks for this works !
Vitani00's avatar
you are talented omg 
PCAwesomeness's avatar
Nice!

Even better is that it has a fin!
Toarcian's avatar
anonymous's avatar
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