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The Penguin History
This is a collage of the Penguin's history with scans of an early appearance of the Penguin in Detective Comics #87 (1944) "The Man of a Thousand Umbrellas" written by Joseph Greene and art by Dick Sprang [reprinted in Batman Archives vol. 4 (1998)], Batman #38 (1946) "The Penguin on Parole" written by Don Cameron and art by Jim Mooney [reprinted in Batman: The Golden Age Omnibus vol. 5 (2018)] and Detective Comics #171 (1951) "The Menace of the Giant Birds" written by Bill Finger and art by Dick Sprang, art of the Penguin by Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez from the DC Comics Batman Returns Style Guide (1992) by Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez [that I recolored to make it accurate] and the Penguin description quotes from The Encyclopedia of Comic Book Heroes: Batman (1976) by Michael L. Fleisher that I combined with the revelations from Batman Returns (1992) and the Batman Returns (1992) novel by Craig Shaw Gardner, "Oswald Cobblepot, Tucker and Esther Cobblepot, were horrified when Oswald was born with a deformed shape, like a penguin -- wide body, with a nose that looks like a beak, and syndactyly hands that look like flippers. And, very sharp teeth. His parents kept him in a cage, they did not want to see him. After little baby Oswald killed the family cat, his mother and father threw him out, like a piece of garbage, in a caged bassinet, into the river. The river current sent the caged child down to the old Arctic World, a leftover pavilion exhibition from an old world's fair. Abandoned penguins were in the old Arctic World, and the old ringmaster found him in there, named him Jimmy, and raised him in the Red Triangle Circus freak show, featured as 'the hideous Penguin Boy - the aquatic bird boy,' exploiting the Penguin for money, where he was bullied and abused. He'd grown to hate ordinary people and normal children. After numerous reports of missing children in several towns, police closed down the Red Triangle Circus's fair-grounds, folded the tents. However, freak-show performer the Penguin vanished before he could be questioned. The Arctic World pavilion was Penguin's hideout now, and the place where he hid his Red Triangle Circus Gang. The Penguin found out that his birth name is Oswald Cobblepot, his parents were rich, with a Cobblepot mansion, and they threw him out, the Penguin's rage grew. He wants to reclaim his birthright, to fulfill a destiny his parents carelessly discarded, and he wants revenge. He rarely appears in public without at least one of his trick umbrellas, including umbrellas which fire bullets, sword-handled umbrellas, a flamethrower umbrella, and a helicopter umbrella. The Penguin also uses penguins he can control by headgear, using a pitch and frequency that would cause penguins to follow his every command, as zombies to the Penguin's radio signal controls, with rockets on their backs."  

In the comics panels on the side the Penguin is using helicopter umbrella and his says to Batman, "One of these days I'll fix you for good!" from Detective Comics #87 (1944) "The Man of a Thousand Umbrellas" written by Joseph Greene and art by Dick Sprang [reprinted in Batman Archives vol. 4 (1998)].

The Penguin uses penguins with explosives on their backs, from Batman #38 (1946) "The Penguin on Parole" written by Don Cameron and art by Jim Mooney [reprinted in Batman: The Golden Age Omnibus vol. 5 (2018)].

The Penguin cons the public and says, "We've got him badly bewildered -- Won't he be suprised when we spring our real coup tomorrow!" and a henchmen says "Yeah, all this stuff we've 'given back' is just bait for the saps!", from Detective Comics #171 (1951) "The Menace of the Giant Birds" written by Bill Finger and art by Dick Sprang.

Danny DeVito's Penguin was based on the classic '40s Penguin comic book art from Dick Sprang that was a killer with deadly umbrellas. Although Bob Kane, Jerry Robinson and Dick Sprang's Penguin art was very cartoony and literally looked like an obese dwarf with a deformed beak nose and penguin-like body shape, Danny DeVito's Penguin particularly resembled the Bob Kane, Jerry Robinson and Dick Sprang Penguin art from the comic books brought to life, with the very short height [Danny DeVito is 4 foot 11 inches and three quarters tall, specifically, [about 5 foot tall - practically a dwarf] and overweight], Danny DeVito's Penguin has the beak nose, the black top hat, stripped pants, flame thrower umbrella, etc. just put into Danny DeVito's real anatomical proportions [which are enhanced to a more penguin-like body shape proportions with a fat suit] with additions to his wardrobe including with an added vest, ascot and trench coat, and expanding on the penguin motif with webbed penguin-like "flipper hands" - which is a real human deformity called syndactyly, making Penguin more of a complete character like a person that could exist and less of a cartoon caricature of a real person.

In the book Batman Returns: The Official Movie Book (1992) by Michael Singer, Tim Burton explained, "I feel like a real kindred spirit with Danny [DeVito], and I think we're really creating something that people will see and enjoy as a natural expansion of the comic book character."

Tim Burton made a painting called "Jimmy The Penguin Boy" (1991) of the Penguin when he was a child in the Red Triangle Circus, that was given to Danny DeVito, and is now in The Art of Tim Burton (2009) book. A lot of people didn't get the clues in Batman Returns that the Red Triangle Circus are who raised the Danny DeVito Penguin, and was named "Jimmy" by the Red Triangle Circus ringmaster most likely, because, since he was abandoned by his parents when he was a baby, he didn't know his real name is Oswald Cobblepot. And he was billed/presented as "the Hideous Penguin Boy, the Bizarre Aquatic Bird Boy" in the Red Triangle Circus freak show. Also included is the old Gotham Globe newspaper report that Bruce Wayne was reading about missing children on the Red Triangle Circus fairgrounds and the police were searching for the Penguin, described as "a young man billed as 'the Bizarre Aquatic Bird Boy' who was last seen in the company of at least one missing child, according to sources." In the comics Bill Finger's original Penguin was without an origin, Michael Fleisher's origin for the "Pre-Crisis" Earth-1 Penguin was getting bullied at school for his mom making him always carry an umbrella [from The Best of DC Blue Ribbon Digest: Secret Origins of Super-Villains (1981) "The Origin of the Penguin" written by Michael Fleisher and art by Romeo Tanghal] and the "Post-Crisis" Penguin's origin was basically the same Michael Fleisher story [in Secret Origins Special #1 (1989) "The Killing Peck" written by Alan Grant and art by Sam Kieth]. Tim Burton found the psychological underpinnings of that origin to be very weak. Tim Burton and Daniel Waters made Penguin's roots far more larger, dark, tragic and epic. Because the Danny DeVito Penguin was rejected by his family, bullied and abused at his freak show job, so Penguin grew up hating normal children that have all the love, acceptance and comforts he never had and he wants his revenge. Penguin also wants to reclaim his birthright.

Danny DeVito explained, "With Batman, I remember the first meeting we had was so great. He had a painting of circus stripes, red and white, just beautiful, just a big canvas. And this creature, and there was a caption that said, ‘My name is Jimmy, but they call me The Hideous Penguin Boy.’ It was so moving."
Danny DeVito on Tim Burton’s Dumbo: “I believe this is the completion of the Circus Trilogy”

In Batman Returns Michael Gough's Burtonverse Alfred calls Danny DeVito's Penguin a "ghastly grotesque." The '40s comics described the Penguin as a "grotesque creature" - Batman #36 (1946) "The Penguin's Nest" for example [Reprinted in Batman: The Dark Knight Archives vol. 8]. And a "grotesque bird" - Batman #25 (1944) "Knights of Knavery" for example [reprinted in The Greatest Batman Stories Ever Told (1988)].

In Prevue [August 1992] Danny DeVito explained, "The Penguin's really two people. In one sense, he's a super-intelligent guy who just wants to be accepted. On the other hand, he's enraged because people find him so revolting they turn away in horror. He could have been well educated like his parents and become a leader, but instead he's been exposed to a bunch of dishonorable characters. It's kind of a tragedy, but we're all the result of our treatment by other people."
Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Prevue" August 1992

In Movieline [July 1992] Danny DeVito explained, "Burton saw Penguin as a character that had been dealt a hand, a certain set of circumstances he was forced to live with all his life, and because of these events, he's been pushed into the darker regions. But his intelligent and his will to live in another realm kind of clash - his circumstances are dark, serious and heartfelt in the underground, but he desires the above world. So I thought that was a really great take on Penguin."
Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Movieline" July 1992

In Starlog #183 (1992) Danny DeVito explained, "His mother and father hated him and threw him out like a piece of garbage. The Penguin is quite an intelligent man, and someone who, from birth, if Oswald's parents had taken the time to accept him as a human being despite his deformities, he might have grown up to be [an] Albert Einstein. But because he was thrown away, and because of who and where he was raised, he became something totally different, totally evil. There are some moments in the film where you can see the insecurities and conflicts that are pulling at him. In a sense, we see him as vulnerable. One of the most telling lines in the entire film is when the Penguin attempts to assimilate into the real world, but he's rejected and turned back to his lair. He yells out, 'I am not a human being! I am an animal!' That line said it all, as far as I was concerned."
Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Starlog" October 1992

In Prevue [August 1992] Tim Burton explained, "I particularly like the characters in this film because they're symbolic of what's going on in the world today. They aren't simply good or bad."
Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Prevue" August 1992

The Iceberg Lounging, weapon smuggling Penguin [that wasn't even in the comics until 1995] was a comic book reboot. The so-called "traditional Iceberg Lounging, weapon smuggling version" is a Post-Crisis/Post-Zero Hour reboot from Detective Comics #683 (1995) "Odds Against" written by Chuck Dixon and art by Graham Nolan. The Penguin made into a John Romita/Stan Lee 1967 Kingpin rip-off. Bruce Timm made the Kingpin of Gotham-Penguin reboot more popular when he adapted that Penguin to The New Batman Adventures animated series in 1998 episodes on TV and DC made the Kingpin-Penguin reboot more popular when they adapted that Penguin to the Arkham City, etc. video games from 2011, it's still not the Golden Age Penguin by Bill Finger and Kane and Jerry Robinson/Dick Sprang, the grotesque bird-man of a thousand umbrellas, that's the true original Penguin Denny DeVito brought to life in the Burtonverse.
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Catwoman History
This is a collage of Catwoman history with scans of an early Catwoman appearance in Batman #35 (1946) "Nine Lives Has the Catwoman" written by Bill Finger and art by Bob Kane and Ray Burnley with Catwoman's hair colored blonde [reprinted in Batman: The Dark Knight Archives vol. 8 (2013)] and Batman #460 (1991) "Sisters in Arms - Part One: It's a Man's World" written by Alan Grant and art by Norm Breyfogle with Tim Sale inks, Catwoman art by Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez from the DC Comics Batman Returns Style Guide (1992) by Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez [that I recolored to make it accurate] and Catwoman description quotes from The Encyclopedia of Comic Book Heroes: Batman (1976) by Michael L. Fleisher that I combined with the revelations from Batman Returns (1992), "Selina Kyle was once a mild-mannered secretary with Shreck Industries, and ruthless Max Shreck tried unsuccessfully to murder her, shoved her out the window of his building, and the impact of the landing sent Selina careening through awnings to the snow. Miraculously, she escaped serious physically injury, but she suffered a head injury when she crashed, giving Selina Kyle temporary amnesia. Shaken by the crash, Selina began her identity as Catwoman, reflecting her deep-seated preoccupation with feline imagery and paraphernalia. She is frequently surrounded by pet cats, particularly a black cat named Miss Kitty. Catwoman sets out to frighten the superstitious into believing that she possesses the nine lives of the proverbial cat. Catwolman wears a black cat costume that covers her entire body -- complemented with a cowl that covers the upper part of her face, a pair of claw gloves, a menacing black bullwhip, and high-heeled boots. She's had physical training - in karate and gymnastics."  

In the comics panels on the side Catwoman says, "The underworld is superstitious - so I will prove to them that I can't be killed!" Her black cat says "Purr-rr-rr! Purr-rr!" from Batman #35 (1946) "Nine Lives Has the Catwoman" written by Bill Finger and art by Bob Kane and Ray Burnley [reprinted in Batman: The Dark Knight Archives vol. 8 (2013)].

Catwoman says, "I've called you here to prove that I can't be killed -- That I have nine lives like the legendary lives of a cat!" The superstitious thugs as first aren't frightened and don't fall for it, they laugh, "Ha! Ha!" Think she's joking, "Are you kiddin'?" And are confused, "Huh?" also from Batman #35 (1946) "Nine Lives Has the Catwoman" written by Bill Finger and art by Bob Kane and Ray Burnley [reprinted in Batman: The Dark Knight Archives vol. 8 (2013)].

Even in the comics panels narration by Bill Finger says playfully and mysteriously, "But providence... (or perhaps the legendary nine lives of a cat!) does save Catwoman..." also from Batman #35 (1946) "Nine Lives Has the Catwoman" written by Bill Finger and art by Bob Kane and Ray Burnley [reprinted in Batman: The Dark Knight Archives vol. 8 (2013)].

Catwoman says, "Ooh...! I like to play rough...!" and a thug screams "Aaagh!", as she slashes his face, from Batman #52 (1949) "The Happy Victims" written by Bill Finger and art by Bob Kane and Lew Sayre Schwartz [reprinted in Batman: The Golden Age Omnibus vol. 6 (2018)] Batman #460 (1991) "Sisters in Arms - Part One: It's a Man's World" written by Alan Grant and art by Norm Breyfogle with Tim Sale inks.

Batman Returns script writer Daniel Waters explained, "To me, the whole nine lives thing was just a piece of dialogue and vague artistic license. It was never something I considered literally."

And Batman Returns director Tim Burton explained in the Batman Returns DVD commentary, "The ambiguous nature of the Catwoman. You start out when you see the creation with the cats coming around and it's not supernatural but we feed into the mythology of cats and nine lives and all of that sort of thing, so in the same way with Batman, wanting to keep him sort of mysterious, we sort of treated the same idea with Catwoman a little bit and not come right out with it. It's not supernatural."

In the Batman Returns script written by Daniel Waters it is explained that Michelle Pfeiffer's Selina Kyle had taken karate lessons. "SELINA: 'I won some karate lessons. Radio thing. I'd been calling for Grateful Dead tix... anyway, I take the course. I was a most serious failure. The instructor kept chanting 'Your mind isn't clear, your mind isn't...' (disturbingly) It is now...'"
And "GRUFF WOMAN: 'Selina ... We've missed you at the rape prevention class ... It's not enough to master martial arts.  Hey, Elvis knew those moves, and he died fat. You must stop seeing yourself as a victim--'"

Michelle Pfeiffer's Catwoman origin in Batman Returns actually harks back to the original Catwoman origin from Batman #62 (1950) "The Secret Life of the Catwoman" written by Bill Finger, art by Bob Kane and Lew Schwartz [reprinted in The Greatest Batman Stories Ever Told #2 (1992)], in which Selina Kyle was an introvert, then survived a crash, but suffered from amnesia. Thereafter she became Catwoman by releasing her formerly repressed inner-self, and all her inhibitions. The version of Catwoman's origin involving the crash (a death and resurrection motif) and amnesia has psychological depth. This origin suggests that Kyle had a dual personality, and that her amnesia released her repressed side, utilize her karate skills, and leading her not only to turn criminal, but to heighten her sexuality as well.

Michelle Pfeiffer's Catwoman is intentionally not the prostitute of the then current "Post-Crisis" Frank Miller Batman: Year One comics reboot. In Fantazone #26 (1992) writer Daniel Waters also explained, "My interest stems from the fact that they told me were going to be doing the Catwoman character and she was not going to be the Julie Newmar prototype of the [Adam West Batman] TV series or the hooker of the comic books. She starts off as this sort of harassed secretary. When she becomes Catwoman it's not the kind of Catwoman we're used to seeing. It's not like she's curled up on a couch in a penthouse. There's a lot wider degrees of emotions that she goes through. It's an incredible performance."

In Prevue magazine [August 1992] Daniel Waters explained, "It's possible our Catwoman won't be cute enough for some people and may ruin a lot of bathroom fantasies, but the character was built for reasons other than to be a heavy metal fetish figure. I wanted her to be every bit as commanding as Batman, which Tim [Burton] liked."

In Time [June 22 1992] Daniel Waters explained about Michelle Pfeiffer's Catwoman, "We wanted her tied deep into female psychology. Female rage is interesting; we made her a mythic woman you can sympathize with. Catwoman isn't a villain, and she isn't Wonder Woman fighting for the greater good of society. But she does have her own agenda. She's nobody's toy. She's a wild card - the movie's independent variable. In the daylight they [Michael Keaton's Bruce Wayne and Michelle Pfeiffer's Selina Kyle] have a sweet, tentative romance, but at night their ids are out, beating the heck out of each other. In costume their ids are active. No kissing there, only one good lick."
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Harley Quinn History
This is a collage of Harley Quinn history with scans of an early Harley Quinn appearance in The Batman Adventures: Mad Love (1994) written by Paul Dini and Bruce Timm and art by Bruce Timm [I recolored the Joker with more detail], Harley Quinn art by Terry Dodson - head from Harley Quinn #4 (2001) "Introducing the Quinntets" written by Karl Kesel and art by Terry Dodson and upper-half from Harley Quinn #5 (2001) "Larger Than Life" written by Karl Kesel and art by Terry Dodson [reprinted in Harley Quinn: Preludes and Knock Knock Jokes (2009)] and lower-half from Harley Quinn #18 "The Bride of Bizarro" written by Karl Kesel and art by Terry Dodson [reprinted in Harley Quinn: Welcome to Metropolis (2014)] [that I put together and recolored to make it accurate], Harley Quinn art by Terry Dodson - upper-half from Harley Quinn #2 (2001) "A Heart Broken in Two" written by Karl Kesel and art by Terry Dodson and lower-half from Harley Quinn #3 (2001) "Welcome to the Party" written by Karl Kesel and art by Terry Dodson [reprinted in Harley Quinn: Preludes and Knock Knock Jokes (2009)] [that I put together and recolored to make it accurate], more Harley Quinn art by Terry Dodson from Harley Quinn #2 (2001) "A Heart Broken in Two" written by Karl Kesel and art by Terry Dodson and more Harley Quinn art by Terry Dodson from Harley Quinn #4 (2001) "Introducing the Quinntets" written by Karl Kesel and art by Terry Dodson [reprinted in Harley Quinn: Preludes and Knock Knock Jokes (2009)], and some description quotes I found by Greg King about Susan "Sadie Mae Glutz" Atkins and Charles "Charlie" Manson from Sharon Tate and the Manson Murders (2000) that I adapted to describe Harleen "Harley Quinn" Quinzel and Jack "Joker" Napier with a creepy reality, "Harleen Quinzel, aka Harley Quinn, is an extremely troubled young woman. Quinzel's first meeting with Jack Napier, aka the Joker, made a deep impact. His early psychiatric evaluation stressed his sense of alienation from society, and determined that he was not only 'criminally sophisticated' but also 'dangerous.' But she listened to him and was enchanted. Rechristened Harley Quinn by Napier, Quinzel became the newest member of his roving Goons. Harleen is the evangelist of the group, always praising the Joker, repeating his teaching, urging the rest to give themselves to his domination. Harleen Quinzel insisted on being known as -- Crazy Harley Quinn. It wasn't just that ridiculous name. She was much to happy, considering where she was. She would laugh at inappropriate times. Harleen said she followed his orders without question -- they all did. His is their 'father,' leader, love. Joker had given instructions. She obliged and wore a harlequin costume. Harleen confided, 'Joker is Jesus.' Napier studied techniques of mind control to what he perceived as his rightful place: that of leader, of seer, of manipulator, of master over life and death. Seething with anger, he indoctrinated his followers to his own view of the world and how things should be." 

In the comics panels on the side, Batman says about the Joker's manipulating lies, "He's gained a lot of sympathy with that one." Harley Quinn says, "Stop it! You're making me confused!" Batman says, "What was it he told that one parole officer? Oh, yes..." from The Batman Adventures: Mad Love (1994) written by Paul Dini and Bruce Timm and art by Bruce Timm.

Harley Quinn says, "You're wrong! My puddin' does love me! He does!" also from The Batman Adventures: Mad Love (1994) written by Paul Dini and Bruce Timm and art by Bruce Timm.

The Joker smacks Harley Quinn, also from The Batman Adventures: Mad Love (1994) written by Paul Dini and Bruce Timm and art by Bruce Timm.
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The Joker History
This is a collage of Joker history with scans of early Joker appearances in Batman #52 (1949) "The Happy Victims" written by Bill Finger and art by Bob Kane and Lew Sayre Schwartz [reprinted in Batman: The Golden Age Omnibus vol. 6 (2018)] and Batman #53 (1949) "A Hairpin, a Hoe, a Hacksaw, a Hole in the Ground" written by Bill Finger and art by Bob Kane and Lew Sayre Schwartz [reprinted in Batman: The Golden Age Omnibus vol. 6 (2018)], Joker art by Jerry Ordway from Batman: The Official Comic Adaption (1989) written by Sam Hamm, Warren Skaaren and Denny O'Neil and art by Jerry Ordway [that I recolored to make it accurate] and some Joker description quotes from The Encyclopedia of Comic Book Heroes: Batman (1976) by Michael L. Fleisher that I combined with the revelations from Batman (1989), "Thomas Wayne and his wife and their young son Bruce were walking from a movie when suddenly a gun-wielding hoodlum leaped from the shadows and blocked their path. With another man, reaching out to grab the necklace around Martha Wayne's neck. Thomas Wayne stepped between his wife and the man. And then the gunman fired - a single shot - and Thomas Wayne slumped dead to the sidewalk. Martha Wayne shrieked, the gunman shut her up as he fired again, and now Martha Wayne fell to the pavement, as Bruce Wayne's eyes widened with terror and the shock of both his parents laying dead. 'You ever dance with the devil?' snarled the gunman, as the Waynes' nameless assassin slipped silently way into the twilight shadows. Then, many years later, the hood Jack Napier, in 'Boss' Grissom's gang, was robbing Axis Chemicals, he finally found himself cornered by Batman on one of the factory's catwalks, and he fell headlong into the vat of chemicals that turned his skin chalk-white, his hair green and his lips rouge-red -- with a changeless wide ghastly grin -- he named himself -- the Joker! Then he resumed his criminal career under that name. The Joker murders with a grisly venom he calls Smylex, which, as it snuffed the life out of each gasping victim, contracted the muscles of the doomed man's face into a ghastly grin, the sign of death from the Joker! The Joker feels that is turning murder into art. Ironically, he uses 'jokes' as deadly weapons -- for example, a hand buzzer that electrocutes, a phony flower that squirts acid."  

The comics panels on the side say, "Then, in an almost absurdly dignified manner, the Joker makes his escape..." from Batman #52 (1949) "The Happy Victims" written by Bill Finger and art by Bob Kane and Lew Sayre Schwartz [reprinted in Batman: The Golden Age Omnibus vol. 6 (2018)]

Joker says, "Behold the Joker...The greatest of all painters - For with my deadly palette, I paint masterpieces of crime! Ha! Ha!" also from Batman #52 (1949) "The Happy Victims" written by Bill Finger and art by Bob Kane and Lew Sayre Schwartz [reprinted in Batman: The Golden Age Omnibus vol. 6 (2018)]

In the book Jack's Life: A Biography (2015) by Patrick McGilligan, it's explained, "Talking with Bob Kane, Nicholson learned that Kane had based the Joker on a character played by Conrad Veidt in a 1927 movie, The Man Who Laughs. The Veidt character wears a perpetual freakish grin because as a boy his check muscles were slit. Nicholson made an effort to track down the silent picture, directed by the German Expressionist Paul Leni, and watched it for pointers."

In Comics Interview #77 (1990) DC writer Jack C. Harris asked, "Was the other man in the alley on the night the Wayne's murder suppose to be Joe Chill?" Producer Michael Uslan explained, "Yes. In fact you'll recall that it was Chill who grabbed Bruce's mother's necklace." Michael Uslan also explained, "In fact, and you'll have to check this with Bob Kane, I think he [Bob Kane] said that if the Joker had been created earlier [in 1939], he would have been the Wayne's killer in the comics, as well."
Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Comics Interview" Issue #77
In Fantazone #1 (1989) Sam Hamm explained, "It struck me as a much better solution to treat his [Batman's] origin as a mystery and gradually work back to it."
www.1989batman.com/2013/10/vin…

In the Comics Interview Super Special (1989) Sam Hamm also explained, "The Joker's origin is pretty much as it was in the comics with the fall into the vat. We don't use the Red Hood shtick because the basic fact is most people don't read comic books, so it wouldn't make any sense to them. The Killing Joke was not around when we started doing this. The thing that was important to me was trying to ground this stuff in an existing reality that everybody could understand. So we've got a gangster plot - crime lords and all that kind of stuff - Godfatheresque."
Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Comics Interview Super Special" Screenwriter Sam Hamm Interview
Jack Nicholson would have looked pretty silly if he was suddenly running around wearing a red helmet over his face and a cape during the whole chemical factory robbery scene just to be slavishly faithful to the 1951 Red Hood story.

In Batman #1 (1940) the Joker kills with a deadly Joker venom chemical weapon which contracted the cheek muscles in the victims face into a ghastly grim as it kills - that's Smilex. Smilex must be made of nitrous oxide laughing gas, laced with strychine, and discontinued CIA VX, which is what discontinued CIA DDID nerve gas in Batman (1989) was likely based on, and causes victims to have laugh spasms and contracts victims cheek muscles, causes paralysis to the victims muscles and kills the victims by asphyxia.

Jack Nicholson's Joker wore what costume designer Bob Ringwood called "retro '40s" Golden Age Joker comics wardrobe. Jack Nicholson's Joker wears what are in essence '40s style, double-breasted three-piece suits, tail coat, trench coat. His hat, which, as Bob Ringwood pointed out, is really a pork-pie classic, with the gaudy purple, green and orange Joker colors from the classic '40s comics. He carries a cane, that's from the comics. His phooey posy squirts acid, also from the comics in Joker #1 (1975) "The Joker's Double Jeopardy" written by Denny O'Neil and art by Irv Novick [reprinted in The Joker: The Clown Prince of Crime (2013)], Detective Comics #476 (1978) "Sign of the Joker" written by Steve Englehart and art by Marshall Rogers [Batman: Strange Apparitions (1999) reprints "Sign of the Joker" (1978)], both the phooey posy squirting acid and the high voltage joy buzzer are in Detective Comics #570 (1987) "The Last Laugh" written by Mike W Barr and art by Alan Davis [reprinted in Legends of the Dark Knight: Alan Davis (2012)]. His seeing himself as an artist is from the comics, too. Joker even wears an oversized artist beret hat in Batman #52 (1949) "The Happy Victims" written by Bill Finger, art by Bob Kane and Lew Sayre Schwartz [ Batman: The Golden Age Omnibus vol. 6 (2018) reprints "The Happy Victims" (1949)], Batman Kellogg's Pop-Tarts Comics (1966) "The Joker's Happy Victims" written by E. Nelson Bridwell and art by Carmine Infantino [The Greatest Joker Stories Ever Told (1988) reprints "The Joker's Happy Victims" (1966)].

In Prevue [September 1989] Jack Nicholson explained, "As a kid, I liked Batman because it was the only comic book that took place at night. So I told Tim [Burton] and the writers to make sure they don't lose that old, ominous, black-and-purple night feeling."
Batman- The 1989 Film: Vintage Magazine Article: "Prevue" September 1989

Kevin Smith claimed, "Tim Burton wasn't really interest in Batman, only the villains." Tim Burton explained in the book Burton on Burton, "That's not true. But there is an inherent difference in the characters. The Joker is an extrovert and Batman an introvert. So you can't match the energy, the balance. You have this character [Batman] who always wants to remain in the shadows, to remain hidden. If these two were standing on the street, Batman would always be wanting to hide [in the shadows], whereas The Joker would be, 'Look at me. Look at me.' So that's part of what the energy of it was. I certainly wasn't less interested in Batman, it's just that he is who he is, and The Joker is who he is. Some people got it, some people understood it. Obviously, a lot of people thought The Joker was the thing, but a lot of people found Michael [Batman] to be more compelling because of that. He captured a certain subtle sadness in his character. And there was a pent-up, bottled-up [rage] feeling to him."
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Luthor History
This is a collage of Luthor history with scans of an early Luthor appearance in Superman #5 (1940) "Luthor's Incense Menace" written by Jerry Siegel and art by Joe Shuster [reprinted in Superman Chronicles vol. 3 (2007)], Action Comics #166 (1952) "The Three Scoops of Death" written by Bill Finger and art by Wayne Boring [that I recolored] and Action Comics #259 (1959) "The Revenge of Luthor!" written by Jerry Siegel and art by Al Plastino [that I recolored] [reprinted in Showcase Presents Superman vol. 2 (2006)], Luthor art by Wayne Boring from Superman #85 (1953) "Luthor--Hero" written by Bill Woolfolk and art by Wayne Boring [that I recolored], Luthor art by Wayne Boring from Superman #88 (1954) "The Terrible Trio" written by Bill Woolfolk and art by Wayne Boring [that I recolored] [reprinted in The Greatest Team-Up Stories Ever Told (1989), Luthor art by Wayne Boring from Superman #79 (1952) "Citadel of Doom" written by Edmond Hamilton and art by Wayne Boring [that I recolored] and Luthor art by Wayne Boring from Superman #81 (1953) "Superman's Secret Workshop" written by Edmond Hamilton and art by Wayne Boring [that I recolored] and some quotes from The Great Superman Book (1978) by Michael L. Fleisher, "Luthor is a scheming con man using bogus news reports, tricking the populace into believing his claims, duping them. Luthor's lifelong goal has always been to establish himself as undisputed 'World dictator' (Superman No. 48 1947 ["The Man Who Stole the Sun" written by Jerry Siegel, reprinted in Superman 3-D (1998)]). Superman has intervened valiantly to thwart Luthor's seething ambition for absolute power. Superman first encounters Luthor when both men are full-grown adults (in Act [Action Comics] No. 23 1940 ["Europe at War" written by Jerry Siegel, reprinted in Superman Chronicles vol. 3 (2007)]). Luthor had a head of red hair (Act [Action Comics] No. 23 1940 ["Europe at War" written by Jerry Siegel] and [just three] others [comics]). Luthor is completely bald-headed (from Superman No. 10 1941 ["The Invisible Luthor" art by Leo Nowak, reprinted in Superman Chronicles vol. 6 (2009)] onward) [so he began shaving his head]. Luthor claims he is 'a super-genius!' Superman has described Luthor as a 'madman' and a 'fiend' (Act [Action Comics] No. 23 1940 ["Europe at War" written by Jerry Siegel]). Luthor deliberately fomented a bloody war raging between European nations as a ploy by Luthor to destroy both sides (Act [Action Comics] No. 23 1940 ["Europe at War" written by Jerry Siegel]). With the nation's financial leaders completely under his control, Luthor is causing nationwide hunger and unemployment while at the same time reaping untold profits through intricate stock-market manipulations. (Superman No. 5 1940 ["Luthor's Incense Menace" written by Jerry Siegel, reprinted in Superman Chronicles vol. 3 (2007)]). 'Simple to trick those gullible fools!' explains Luthor aloud, not realizing that he is being overheard through the walls by Superman's super-hearing. (Act [Action Comics] No. 42 1941 ["The Empire in the Sky" written by Jerry Siegel, reprinted in Superman Chronicles vol. 7 (2009)]). Luthor broadcasts a bogus television-news report which tricks the populace into believing Luthor. (Superman No. 57 1949 ["The Menace of the Machine Men" written by Edmond Hamilton]). Luthor falsely claims to be a hero - as an elaborate fraud staging by Luthor and his cohorts. (Superman No. 85 1953 ["Luthor--Hero" written by Bill Woolfolk])."   

In the comics panels on the side the wealthy corrupt conservative elites say, "Pretty slick the way we continue to pile up profits while the rest of the country goes bankrupt, eh?" "Yeah, an' we owe it all to...[Luthor]" from Superman #5 (1940) "Luthor's Incense Menace" written by Jerry Siegel and art by Joe Shuster [reprinted in Superman Chronicles vol. 3 (2007)].

Luthor says, "I'm going to use the robot [artificial intelligence] to destroy Clark Kent! He's the one who exposes all my rackets in his newspaper articles...But I intend to see him executed for the murder of Perry White...A crime for which I will give him the perfect motive!" from Action Comics #166 (1952) "The Three Scoops of Death" written by Bill Finger and art by Wayne Boring.

Luthor says, "Cause their downfall, in my cunning hands!" from Action Comics #259 (1959) "The Revenge of Luthor!" written by Jerry Siegel and art by Al Plastino.

Jerry Siegel based Luthor on Hitler [in Action Comics #23 (1940) "Europe at War" based on World War II] and Calvin Coolidge [in Superman #5 (1940) "Luthor's Incense Menace" based on the Great Depression]. Joe Shuster appeared to physically have based red haired Luthor on Julius Caesar, Caligula and Napoleon. Wayne Boring appeared to physically have based bald Luthor on Mussolini.
Trump and Putin are the classic Luthor types of today. Trump and Putin are both trying to develop artificial intelligence. Trump signed an executive order making artificial intelligence development a priority. Putin says the nation that leads in artificial intelligence development "will be the ruler of the world. Artificial intelligence is the future, not only for Russia, but for all humankind. It comes with colossal opportunities, but also threats that are difficult to predict. Whoever becomes the leader in this sphere will become the ruler of the world."

The original classic 1940s and 1950s Luthor was based on reality. Yet, the 1960s and 1970s Lex Luthor reboots are silly and unfortunately the most popular versions. The Mort Weisinger/Curt Swan '60s Lex that hates Superman because he made him bald when he was Superboy is silly. That is not a good motive and that version is so generic he wore a prison uniform even when he wasn't in prison. Gene Hackman's '70s "wig wearing" Lex with Otis is the most popular and extremely silly and the popular '70s Elliot Maggin/Curt Swan and Hanna-Barbara Super Friends Lex in purple tights is silly and then there is the '80s Cary Bates/George Perez Super Powers Lex as an Iron Man wannabe in a Galactus like green/purple Iron Lex suit - that's Marvelizing Lex Luthor. Luthor trying to fight Superman physically is foolish and out of character for classic Luthor, he'd try to trick and outsmart Superman instead. Did dictators Hitler himself or Mussolini himself try to physically punch out Roosevelt? No. Luthor himself wouldn't try to physically punch out Superman. Classic Luthor's lifelong goal had always been to establish himself as undisputed "World dictator". Dictators have others do the physical fighting for them.  
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Stevenson E Leey
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:iconjoshvirgin:
joshvirgin Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
If You Were To Do A Phantom Manor Movie Who Would You Cast?
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:iconstevenely:
StevenEly Featured By Owner 2 days ago   Traditional Artist
I'd use the Vincent Price recorded narration. Eva Green as Melanie Ravenswood. I think Christoph Waltz as Henry Ravenswood-the Phantom.
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:iconjoshvirgin:
joshvirgin Featured By Owner 2 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
Nice. Here's My Cast. :)
Robert Englund As The Phantom And Henry Ravenswood. (He's Actually A Fan Of Vincent Price.)
Emmy Rossum As Melanie Ravenswood.
Eva Green As Madame Leota.
Zac Efron As Jake (Melanie's Groom) I Could Change It.
The Dapper Dans Of Disneyland As The Singing Busts.
That's All I Got. :) (Smile)
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:iconstevenely:
StevenEly Featured By Owner 1 day ago   Traditional Artist
I pick Lisa Marie Smith as Madame Leota.

The Dapper Dans are the Singing Busts in Eddie Murphy's Haunted Mansion.
laughing felix 


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(1 Reply)
:iconjoshvirgin:
joshvirgin Featured By Owner 3 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
Favorite And Least Favorite Things About The Phantom Manor Updates? :)
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:iconstevenely:
StevenEly Featured By Owner 3 days ago   Traditional Artist
It looks sharper now and looks like a real old house. The paintings on the walls look better, too. But the lighting was darker and spookier before.
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:iconjoshvirgin:
joshvirgin Featured By Owner 3 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
True. Though Some Of It Seemed Lazy. The Animatronics Seem A Lot Better Now. :)
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:iconjoshvirgin:
joshvirgin Featured By Owner 4 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
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:iconstevenely:
StevenEly Featured By Owner 3 days ago   Traditional Artist
Loving it!
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:iconjoshvirgin:
joshvirgin Featured By Owner 3 days ago  Hobbyist Photographer
Same Here. :)
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