Street...without People
|5 min read
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StamatisGR's avatar
By StamatisGR   |   Watch
46 29 7K (1 Today)
Published: May 28, 2012

PART IV


The series of 5 articles about Street Photography made by myraincheck and slightly edited by moi* continues with:

STREET PHOTOGRAPHY…WITHOUT PEOPLE



First things first let's remember that street photography is not so much about the subjects as it is a style of photographing, a 'forma mentis', a way to think, see, capture images. A forma mentis that can be summed up in the ability of RE-INTERPRETING, RE-CONTEXTUALIZING, giving a different interpretation, placing in a different context, the reality around us, giving it an additional significant meaning.
Even if the classic structure of street photography is a meaningful interaction between human and surroundings, we can have street photos where the human element is not physically present. Sometimes it can be symbolized by other elements, sometimes it is completely absent. Let's show some examples:

SYMBOLIC HUMAN PRESENCE


The human element is not physically present, but there are elements that symbolize humans:

  

by Jesse Marlow


  

by Jesse Marlow


  

by David Gibson


  

by Melanie Einzig

REFRAMING


Reframing means placing in a different context what we see, through the process of selection, organization and interpretation of the elements, changing the meaning of elements. This is done carefully SELECTING those elements to include and exclude form the composition, ORGANIZING them in a composition which is able to give a message, a story, a narration, a content open to INTERPRETATION.

To still be considered street, the images with inanimate subjects or animals really have to be a step ahead, not fall in self-reference, didascalic, trivial or simplicistic representation of objects.


  

by Matt Stuart


  

by Mark Powell


  

by Blake Andrews

NO PEOPLE STREET PHOTOGRAPHY by dA Streephers



:bigthumb299077536: by :iconmariuszlemiecha:

158 by eyalbin by :iconeyalbin:

The Invisible Workman by myraincheck by :iconmyraincheck:

:bigthumb303260994: by :iconstamatisgr:

Free your Soul by myraincheck by :iconmyraincheck:

within spiration by SimonSawSunlight by :iconsimonsawsunlight:

Jesus by Treamus by :icontreamus:

:bigthumb278798020: by :iconsagi-k:

:bigthumb289100855: by :iconhbapt:

Funny legs by laurent-conduche by :iconlaurent-conduche:


Recommended Journals
Street and neighborhood
Sometimes deciding if a photo fits Street category or not can be really quibbling. Categories mean nothing outside this place (or other art sites) and mean nothing about the value or quality of an image. Though they are useful to make it easier to see, discover, find street images. I hope that these few lines will be able to clear some of the most common doubts in submitting to street category, and would spare you flipping a coin before submitting. So let's try to set some limits to street photography, even knowing that the edges between street photography and other neighbors genres of photography will ALWAYS be thin, vague, and often subje
The Artist's Toolbox: Street Photography
This article is for the CR project 'The Artist's Toolbox' Talking about an 'artist's toolbox' for street photography is simple and difficult at the same time. It is simple because basically to take a street photograph all you need is a camera. Street photography is about seeing and reacting, you don't 'make' a photo but mostly you see, find, seize it. It is difficult because street photographers bitch over everything and never agree. They argue about analog cameras against digital ones. Whether you’re required to look through the viewfinder when you shoot. If it is still a decisive moment if you can look at it in a LCD screen and reta
Street Photography: To Lo And Behold!
Street Photography Quiz: When was the last time a random passenger in a bus made your jaw drop? Happens with me all the time! Whenever I go out into the streets, I never plan on what I'm going to shoot, nor do I have a particular theme in mind. Mind you, planning ahead is highly benefical to a Street Photographer or any photographer for that matter - a practice that almost always yeilds excellent results when properly utilized. For me, it's just the sheer excitment of stepping into a vast concrete jungle, unsure about what's around the next corner, or perceiving an event that is about to unfold before you, the sound of your heart beatin
Featured in groupsSee All
Comments28
anonymous's avatar
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batmantoo's avatar
batmantooHobbyist Photographer
I must have been in a coma to have missed this one... I love this kind of street. :D
Itsiko's avatar
ItsikoHobbyist Photographer
Amazing article again, good job!
This might be a bit OT, but:
After reading this article, I've finally starting to understand the work of James Marlow. Marlow is a talented, respected and awarded street photographer, yet, it took me long time to really understand exactly why is he so popular. At first I just thought he's style isn't for me but now, after reading your articles and especially this one, I'm starting to see his work differently, and now I understand his popularity.
So thank you StamatisGR, for widening my worldview :)
StamatisGR's avatar
StamatisGR Photographer
and thank you for your most encouraging and kind words :)
David-Will's avatar
David-WillHobbyist Photographer
I worry a little about introducing this into the Street genre. I do understand the concept of human element or symbolic human presence, but I've always used it to distinguish between things like Architecture and Urban or City Life. A wall of windows is architecture, but a wall of windows with laundry hanging out of them is urban or City Life. Is there any historical reference to support Street without people, or Street with only animals?
StamatisGR's avatar
StamatisGR Photographer
Except from images from famous Street photographers,
none I have heard of.
JamminJo's avatar
JamminJoHobbyist Photographer
Added to #DevNews posting on June 1, 2012
itsbumblebee's avatar
itsbumblebeeHobbyist Writer
Amazing :D
Kamachu's avatar
KamachuStudent Digital Artist
Wonderful collection!! :wow:
firegirl27tx's avatar
So awesome!
And Inspiring!
NunoFigueira's avatar
Always a feast to our eyes :ahoy:
LonelySorceress's avatar
LonelySorceressStudent Photographer
So....following on from the bit where you mention animals in street photography, could one make some sort of metaphor between urban wildlife and human society?
StamatisGR's avatar
StamatisGR Photographer
I guess one can.
Nattygrego's avatar
NattygregoHobbyist Photographer
anothergreat selection. and good examples to stand for ur explanation !!! great work stam !
fuxs's avatar
fuxsHobbyist Photographer
:beer:
Ikarisou's avatar
Oh another one, what a treat! Thanks, Mary & Stam!
PEN-at-Work's avatar
Again, thanks for your Sisiphus style task. If no one else is learning, at least I am!

:blowkiss:
du-jamais-vu's avatar
cheers, maria and stam! great articles with lots of awesome examples... had never seen the second jesse marlow photo before... thanks for that... street without people is very intriguing indeed, and it seems some DA street togs really get the hang of it...
StamatisGR's avatar
StamatisGR Photographer
Glad you like it Steve! This kind of street needs very observant eyes
and I can't say I'm keen on this :)
myraincheck's avatar
street without people but with human presence nevertheless is a less explored field which I find most intriguing :-) . I hope the article will inspire streeters, it is a kind of street photography that suits the shy and reflexive streeters and that gives a lot of satisfactions (at least to me :D ).
And I've got to say that in dA we have some photos that can really compete with the masters' ones!
StamatisGR's avatar
StamatisGR Photographer
Indeed we have! :nod:
DougNZ's avatar
Wonderful, thanks guys I love these journals! :D
anonymous's avatar
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