Michelangelo
|11 min read
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Published: February 21, 2014

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni.

Best known as Michelangelo...


Selfie by SRudy


Portrait of Michelangelo by Jacopino del Conte


Introduction

  • Michelangelo

Michelangelo was an italian painter, sculptor, architect, poet, and engineer. He was born in 1475 in Caprese, Italy (today known as Caprese Michelangelo).
As a young boy, Michalengelo started studying grammar but then he showed no interest in schooling. He preferred copying paintings from churches and seeking company of painters, He started improving his skills at a very early age. When Michelangelo was 13 he was set to be an artist. He became a pupil of the great sculptor, Donatello.
Michelangelo was considered as the greatest living artist in his lifetime. He received commissions from some of the most wealthy and powerful men of his day, including popes and others affiliated with the Catholic Church.
Michelangelo lived to the age of 89, and died in 1564.

  • Italian Renaissance

The Italian Renaissance was a period of a great cultural change and achievement that began in the 14th century and lasted until the 16th century.
Michelangelo was one of the most powerful Renaissance leaders alongside Leonardo Da Vinci, Botticelli, Caravaggio, Ghiberti, and Raphael.


Artworks

  • Painting

Michelangelo is considered one of the greatest painters of all time. Michelangelo's greatest painting achievement is the famous Sistine Chapel walls. Especially the "The Last Judgement", the frontal walls of the church, and "The Creation of Adam" At the top ceiling.
Michelangelo's paintings style was mostly characterised by the excessive presence of male nudes, body muscles, drapery and architectural perspectives (With the help of Ghiberti after he discovered the principles of perspective).
Some of his most famous other paintings are: Doni Tondo (The Holy Family), The Battle of Cascina, and The Torment of Saint Anthony.

Creation of Adam Michelangelo by SRudy

The creation of Adam, a small part of the Sistine Chapel ceiling.



Click here to see the

Sistine Chapel in 3D!


  • Sculpting

Michelangelo's earliest sculpture was made in the Medici garden near the church of San Lorenzo; his Bacchus and Sleeping Cupid, both show the results of careful observation of the classical sculptures located in the garden. Throughout Michelangelo's sculpted work one finds both a sensitivity to mass and a command of unmanageable chunks of marble. His famous Pietà sculpture places the body of Jesus in the lap of the Virgin Mother; the artist's force and majestic style are balanced by the sadness and humility in Mary's gaze.
In 1504 he sculpted David, in a very classical style, giving him a perfectly proportioned body and musculature. 

David by SRudy

Statue of David by Michelangelo


Moses, his last major sculpture. The artist made the statue from a block of marble deemed rigid by earlier sculptors; his final product conveys his own skill for demonstration of mass within stone and a sense of Moses' anguish.


Sculptures by SRudy


Left: Tomb of Pope Julius II, Right Pietà 


Other famous sculptures of Michelangelo are Tomb of Giuliano de' Medici (Journal's header), and Cristo della Minerva.

  • Architecture

In his architectural works, Michelangelo defied the conventions of his time. His Laurentian Library - 1520, designed for the book storage purposes of Pope Leo X, was memorable for its mixture of mannerist architecture; it demonstrates Michelangelo's free approach to structural form. The Capitoline Square, designed by Michelangelo during the same period, was located on Rome's Capitoline Hill. Its shape, more a rhomboid than a square, was intended to counteract the effects of perspective. At its center was a statue of Marcus Aurelius. From 1540 to 1550 Michelangelo redesigned St. Peter's Basilica in Rome, completing only the dome and four columns for its base before his death.


St.Peter by SRudy


Saint Peter's Basilica - Rome

 




I feel as lit by fire a cold countenance
That burns me from afar and keeps itself ice-chill;
A strength I feel two shapely arms to fill
Which without motion moves every balance.


Poem by Michelangelo 




Features



Prenda IX by napoleoman
La Mano di Cristo by aburningmember
Mother Mary by evenstar785
Prenda X by napoleoman
:bigthumb151361677:
Michelangelo - Study Christ by AEnigm4



Thanks for reading!



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Skin by SRudy

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Comments (32)
pica-ae's avatar
pica-ae|Professional Interface Designer
Great article and lovely journal skin for it :love: 
Reply  ·  
SRudy's avatar
SRudy|Professional Traditional Artist
:bow:
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pica-ae's avatar
pica-ae|Professional Interface Designer
:clap: 
Reply  ·  
Lintu47's avatar
Lintu47|Hobbyist Photographer
:clap:
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SRudy's avatar
SRudy|Professional Traditional Artist
:la:
Reply  ·  
LupaSenzaLuna's avatar
LupaSenzaLuna|Hobbyist General Artist
A little fact about Michelangelo: he hated oil paintings. And he considered himself a sculptor, and in the first time he tried to refuse the commission from Pope Giulio II to decorate the Sistine Chapel, saying that Raffaello Sanzio was better for this work. In fact, he was so physical in his works, that he didn't learn how to fresco before start to work on the Chapel. He despised painters, sit all day in their warm atelier, painting like weak women! :D but in the end he accepted to do the Sistine Chapel, using the rare technique of pure fresco. He almost died while working: it was extremely hard to work on a scaffolding, painting as fast as he can (it's called "fresco" because you need to finish the piece before the plaster dried up, it's one fo the most complicated technique to decorate a wall) and accusing very bad health condition on his eyes, back and legs. 

But he did it. He really belived in what he did, art was a real religion for Michelangelo. And we all learn from him. :)
Reply  ·  
SRudy's avatar
SRudy|Professional Traditional Artist
What a beautiful story :heart: Thanks for sharing.

My graphic design senior project is going to be about him.
Reply  ·  
LupaSenzaLuna's avatar
LupaSenzaLuna|Hobbyist General Artist
Cool! :D I studied a lot about him, I'm a italian fine art student and he's a sort of incarnate god for us :rofl: so ask away if you need, I'm not a art teacher, but I'll help you if I can :XD: 
Reply  ·  
SRudy's avatar
SRudy|Professional Traditional Artist
Thanks a lot I'll keep that in mind! 
Reply  ·  
Rose-Em's avatar
Rose-Em|Student Writer
Ah, history is my place to be and this is a really good over-view of the artist Micherlangelo. Ever thought of doing another edition like this of another artist you like?
Reply  ·  
SRudy's avatar
SRudy|Professional Traditional Artist
Yes I will for sure!
Reply  ·  
Rose-Em's avatar
Rose-Em|Student Writer
Awesome! I'll be sure to look forward to more!
Reply  ·  
SRudy's avatar
SRudy|Professional Traditional Artist
:D
Reply  ·  
ChocolateSun's avatar
What a wonderful overview.
Reply  ·  
SRudy's avatar
SRudy|Professional Traditional Artist
:D
Reply  ·  
TheReptilianGeneral's avatar
TheReptilianGeneral|Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Wow this is good!
Reply  ·  
SRudy's avatar
SRudy|Professional Traditional Artist
Thanks! :D
Reply  ·  
Chezzy-Am's avatar
Chezzy-Am|Professional Writer
thank you for writing this article :)
Reply  ·  
SRudy's avatar
SRudy|Professional Traditional Artist
:thanks:
Reply  ·  
alekgorn's avatar
alekgorn|Hobbyist Traditional Artist
he wasn't a da Vinci, but was awesome :)
Reply  ·  
SRudy's avatar
SRudy|Professional Traditional Artist
I personally prefer MA over Da Vinci
Reply  ·  
alekgorn's avatar
alekgorn|Hobbyist Traditional Artist
da vinci wasn't just an  Artist,  was a genius of almost alll subjects
Reply  ·  
SRudy's avatar
SRudy|Professional Traditional Artist
Je sais
Reply  ·  
PeshugadePosho's avatar
PeshugadePosho|Student General Artist
This was so interesting, FOR REAL
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