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Brachytrachelopan mesai skeletal reconstruction by SpinoInWonderland Brachytrachelopan mesai skeletal reconstruction by SpinoInWonderland
Brachytrachelopan mesai ("Mesa's short-necked shepherd god") is a species of dicraeosaurid diplodocoid that lived in what is now Patagonia during the Late Jurassic. It's remains were found in the Canadon Calcareo Formation. It has the proportionally shortest neck known in any known sauropod, short even by dicraeosaurid standards, and it's tall, anterior-leaning cervical neural spines would have had prevented it from raising it's neck much beyond horizontal.

Missing portions were filled in using Dicraeosaurus.
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Hip height: ~2.15 metres

Shoulder height: ~2.1 metres

Total height: ~2.62 metres

Standing length: ~12.56 metres

Axial length: ~13.05 metres
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References/sources:

Rauhut et al., 2005, "Discovery of a short-necked sauropod dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of Patagonia"
Rauhut & Lopez-Arbarello, 2008, "Archosaur evolution during the Jurassic: A Southern perspective"
Janensch, 1929, "Die Wirbelsäule der Gattung Dicraeosaurus"
Janensch, 1936, "Die Schädel der Sauropoden Brachiosaurus, Barosaurus und Dicraeosaurus aus den Tendaguru-Schichten Deutsch-Ostafrikas"
Janensch, 1961, "Die Gliedmaszen und Gliedmaszengürtel der Sauropoden der Tendaguru-Schichten"
Salgado & Bonaparte, 1991, "Un nuevo sauropodo Dicraeosauridae, Amargasaurus cazaui gen. et sp. nov., de la Formacion La Amarga, Neocomiano de la Provincia del Neuquén, Argentina"
Mallison et al., 2009, "Mechanical digitizing for paleontology - new and improved techniques"
Greg Paul, 2016, "The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs"
dinosaurpalaeo.files.wordpress…
svpow.files.wordpress.com/2008…
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UPDATE(3/16/2018): Some tweaks to silhouette, teeth and scalebar updated to my new conventions.
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:iconmariolanzas:
MarioLanzas Featured By Owner 8 hours ago   General Artist
is the tail really that disproportionately long?
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:iconstrick67:
Strick67 Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2018
That's one sawn-off sauropod!
Not a dinosaur I heard much about other than the short description in the Princeton Field Guide.

Nice reconstruction.
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:icongigaboss101:
GigaBoss101 Featured By Owner Edited Jan 23, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
#Hippopod
Also, i'm really surprised people haven't heard of this guy.
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:iconthewatcherofworlds:
TheWatcherofWorlds Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2018
Shepherd god... wow
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2018
That's because it was named after Pan, the Greek god of shepherds. This was supposed to refer to the fact that Daniel Mesa (the person the specific epithet was named after) found the specimen while he was looking for stray sheep.
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:iconthewatcherofworlds:
TheWatcherofWorlds Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2018
I can just imagine a large flock of sheep following the sauropod...
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:iconphillip2001:
Phillip2001 Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Very great!! :D

Fantastic job on this. :)
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2018  Professional Traditional Artist
It's the diplodcoid hippo-cow! With that low belly it's a big possibility this animal was semi-aquatic. I'm not a big fan of that theory with sauropods, but in the case of REALLY deep/low bellies like this or like Yongjinglong (and other opisthocoelicaudines) you really have to wonder...
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Edited Jan 11, 2018  Professional Traditional Artist
Good one. I like this skeletal better than the other ones online. The short thick neck looks a lot more believable here, with the bigger body and smoother spine curve.

This animal is probably the best example of why sauropods don't need equal-length necks and tails for "balance". Heavy quadrupeds can have any length of neck and tail, even wildly "mismatched" looking ones, and still balance just fine. The other extreme of this case would be smaller tails and whoppin' long necks - mamenchisaurs, brachiosaurs, some chubutisaurs, euhelopodids, and a few crazy-necked titanosaurs like Rapetosaurus that have little tails.
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2018
Yeah, it's like people forget that the vast majority of the mass is still packed in the torso. However impressive the necks and tails of sauropods may seem, they still constitute a low portion of the total mass and have little actual effect on balance.
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2018  Professional Traditional Artist
dingdingding!!! We HAVE A WINNER :XD:

Finally someone on DA other than the big names, gets what I've been saying about sauropods. 75-80% of the mass was in the torso, hips and limbs. NOT the neck and tail. "Balance" wasn't even on their minds.

You may well go on to achieve great things. Like a PhD. or at least the St. Regis University version :P
Reply
:iconwyatt-andrews-art:
Wyatt-Andrews-Art Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
S O













H U G G A B L E
Reply
:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2018
LOL
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2018
WTF evolution
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2018
That is what happens when sauropods actually specialize towards low grazing habits.
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:iconspinosaurus14:
Spinosaurus14 Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2018
Wow what the fuck is this.
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2018
A specialized low-grazing sauropod.
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:icon9weegee:
9Weegee Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Never heard of it, and I'm quite surprised that I haven't. Anyways, this is wayy to underrated.
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2018
Yeah, many sauropods are quite underrated. It's sad, really. People are always going on and on about popular overused stock taxa, while the rest are just forgotten.
Reply
:iconevodolka:
Evodolka Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
1 of the weirdest yet coolest sauropods :D
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:icondinopithecus:
Dinopithecus Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2018
If non-avian dinosaurs were still alive today or had we ever lived with them, I think we'd consider this short necked sauropod with a tail longer than its body to be a freak.
Reply
:icondinopithecus:
Dinopithecus Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2018
Then again, we don't actually have the tail.
Reply
:iconmajestic-colossus:
Majestic-Colossus Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2018
Very good skeletal. The detail is great!
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:iconbh1324:
bh1324 Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2018
Sauropod trying to be an Iguanodontid, or alternativelly an Stegosaurid ;)
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2018
That's pretty much Dicraeosauridae in a nutshell, but Brachytrachelopan takes it even further than the rest.
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:iconmerkavadragunov:
MerkavaDragunov Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2018
what strange looking creature
awesome skeletal
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:iconasari13:
asari13 Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
nice
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Edited Jan 6, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Very nice skeletal.
I´m somewhat surprised by the massive tail.
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2018
The tail looks massive due to it's short neck :) (Smile) 
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Edited Jan 6, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It also looks massive just in general, even compared to that potato-like torso.
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2018
That's due to it being cross-scaled based on the ilium so it can fit well with the hips. Brachytrachelopan's ilium is apparently larger than that of Dicraeosaurus hansemanni in both relative and absolute terms going by the figures and scalebars (no written measurements were provided), so the parts scaled based on it ended up quite large.

I had the tail scaled smaller some time back (scaled based on the dorsals) during the making of the skeletal, but then the ischium, when scaled and articulated, encompassed far too many caudals (about ~6-7 IIRC), something not seen in Dicraeosaurus (the gapfiller taxon).
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I wasn´t saying it was wrong. I already read your good reasons on discord.
Reply
:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2018
Okay.
Reply
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