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Vasquez

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Brush and india ink on 11x17 bristol.
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3300x5236px 1.4 MB
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© 2021 SKY-BOY
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Atlas0's avatar

Awe-inspiring!

Rasmane's avatar

Perfect interpretation of that filmed moment in time!

12jack12's avatar

Very well done. Thumbsup Emoticon II


Hudson: "Hey Vasquez, Have You Ever Been Mistaken For A Man?" — Vasquez: "No. Have You?"

NRGComics's avatar

Such a badass! Well done!

Lemiken7's avatar

'You always were an asshole Gorman'


Great work! :)

Rasmane's avatar

That line still doesn’t make sense...

Lemiken7's avatar

I think it eludes to something that happened between those two in the past.

Rasmane's avatar

I don’t know if there is some other lore about them (in comics, games, or novelizations), but in the theatrical cut of the movie, according to dialogue, Gorman is a brand-new lieutenant, straight out of cyro-sleep. His only woken relationship with the unit (Hicks, Hudson, Frost, Ferro, Apone, Vasquez, et al.) is from the few hours spent on LV-426.

The problem with the line is the phrasing ‘always were’. That implies long-term dealings. The put-down “You’re STILL an asshole, Gorman” would have made more sense.

Granted, the spoken line is softer, a sympathetic balm for someone who’s getting ready to eat an incendiary grenade with her—but when else was Vasquez soft?

dauw's avatar

My interpretation: "You're still an asshole" would make sense if Vasquez was looking to simply put Gorman down, but I don't think she was. There is some earnest, if grudging respect behind her final words. Gorman made a lot of mistakes, but he put himself on the path to redemption when he bravely and selflessly decided to go back for Vasquez and, when realising they weren't going to make it, provided the means with which to end things on their terms. The line "You always were an asshole, Gorman" communicates respect and camaraderie while not veering into sentimentality, and is perhaps precisely the praise Gorman earned in the end, no more no less. Basically a way of saying "I guess you had it in you after all", or "It's been an honor" when it really hadn't and neither of those would sound right coming from Vasquez.

DarkestOfAllShadows's avatar

This is so super cool. I love Vasquez!

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