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Art History Week



Have you ever wondered why every baby is creepy-looking in Medieval art?

  
That's one creepy baby you've got there, lady...

It's not just one artist in one place painting children as if they are going into their fourth decade of life fighting tooth and nail either. It's a pandemic of ugly-looking babies held by morose-looking mothers. Her face is almost always inexplicably sad. It is almost as if she's secretly asking herself "Where have I gone wrong?" in every single painting. Was it simply a case of people being bad at painting everywhere? Or was there a secret plague that deformed every single baby across the continent during those dark, dark ages? 


The Utility of Symbolism


It's hard to take our eyes away from the bizarre babies, but if one take a closer look at these paintings, one thing jumps out to the fore. These are all religious paintings. That's no ordinary creepy-looking baby and the woman holding him isn't just a sad-looking mother. These scenes are all depicting a certain sad mother holding her very special child: The Virgin Mary and baby Jesus. 

A culture's ideas and concept of what they see in front of them will dictate what they put down on paper. During the Medieval period, paintings weren't just pieces of art; they were a means to convey ideas and to tell stories. Most of the population during these days were illiterate, after all. They depend on the Church-issued iconography and symbolism to make sense of the world around them. Realism, therefore, was not an essential element in painting during the Medieval period. Expressionism was the artistic convention of the time for its usefulness. The artists themselves would have followed that convention both for their own sense of prestige but also for conformity. During the Dark Ages, only religious bodies have the power and money to commission artworks with very few exceptions. It was important for the artists to keep the status quo for good business (you really don't want to get on the bad side of the Church...) This meant that each one of these paintings are actually a kind of unified iconography that is meant to recount the Biblical stories and give the viewers a sense of awe and respect as expected by those who had commissioned them. This meant these man-babies were deliberately painted as "miniature old men" because they were meant to be respected as one would respect a fully-grown adult. A mean-looking, man-child adult. 


What you are seeing is an allegory... of something...

The Invisible Hand of Pythagoras 


The Greek philosopher Pythagoras didn't just come up with equations about triangles; he was the first person to come up with the idea that we will eventually call "Preformationism". It was a belief that was once very popular, and for a while it made a lot of sense - all things grow from miniature versions of themselves. When translated into people, this meant that that humans existed as miniature versions of themselves inside the father and they needed the mother's womb as an incubation chamber to grow up to a certain size in order to be born. Put in another way, we have all of the faculties and features that we would ever have before the moment we are born, wrinkles and all.

Fast forward to Medieval ages, the idea of preformationism was sanctioned by the Church and was deeply rooted in the popular conscience. This is also the reason why alchemists of this era were looking for ways to create a "homunculus", which is just a miniature version of a living, breathing human outside of the womb. (It also explains why the creation of such "artifacts" required blood and semen from the alchemist.) Indeed, when the human sperm was first put under the microscope by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek in 1677, he described seeing miniature humans crouched inside the head. The understanding was so wide-spread and well-understood that it wasn't until late 1800's that preformationism started to fall out of favour. Therefore, preformationism was taken as the "natural order of things" during the Dark Ages.  And according to Professor Michael Averett, an art history professor at Creighton University who edited the anthology The Early Modern Child in Art and History: "There's the idea that Jesus was perfectly formed and unchanged. And if you combine that with Byzantine painting, it became a standard way to depict Jesus. In some of these images, it looks like he had male pattern baldness."

In the eyes of the artists, they were painting Jesus the way he ought to be seen. They thought they were painting the "real" version of him, so to speak. It's just too bad that their idea of baby Jesus is nothing short of horrifying.


Honestly... this is nightmare fuel...


Making Babies Beautiful Again


If there was a reason for these les enfants terrible, then how did we we come to painting babies that look like babies again? 

The Renaissance eventually saw a more peaceful period in Europe where there were fewer wars and more trade. The cities grew up around the merchant class and the Churches were not the only property holders - both in material goods and intellectual property. This meant there was more knowledge transfer and exchange between different places as well. As a consequence, we as a society have started seeing our world and our children in a different light. Now that people are no longer living under the shadow of the Black Death, children are seen as innocent again. With the rise of the middle class, art was commissioned by lords and ladies and even rich merchants. Gone were the days where the Church's sanction dictated what you can or cannot draw. There was a trend towards breaking away from the old way of doing things during the Renaissance. A renewed interest in classicism where human bodies were depicted in a more naturalistic way crept back into the public consciousness, too. With more artists willing to try their hands on depicting what they see around them instead of what they were told to see around them, our babies became beautiful in paintings again. 

"If we're thinking about children in a fundamentally different light, the painting will reflect the attitudes," Professor Averett says. "Style is chosen. We might look at medieval art and go, 'These people don't look right.' But if your goal is to look like Picasso and you make a realistic painting, they'd say you didn't do it right, either."


    
Comparing to the way it was...
  
I am so glad we paint normal-looking babies now...



  • If "the paintings reflect our attitudes," have you noticed any recurrent themes in your own work?
  • Do you think your own work is more symbolic or naturalistic? Which do you prefer?
  • Have you encountered anything that's as inexplicable as these "ugly babies" that you have always wanted to ask about? Let us know! :)


When TheGalleryOfEve first asked "Does anyone know why babies look ugly in old paintings?" I answered the call. 
What I didn't realise was how many people are interested in finding out the answer to this exact question. 

I don't know about you, but art history has always been fascinating to me. And if you ask me, knowing why the babies all look like miniature balding men says a whole lot about us as a culture and a species. I hope this article finally explains the reason to you. And I hope you can go out and confidently tell other people "Yes! I know why the babies look atrocious!" :shakefist:
Add a Comment:
 
:iconloffy0:
Loffy0 Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2018  Hobbyist Photographer
"our babies become beautiful again" judging by those last images... you meant to say "far less disturbing" because sorry those babies still look bizarre! However MUCH better than what came before :rofl:

This was incredibly interesting! I am upset I did not keep up! I love your articles man! Can't wait to see what else you've come up with :)
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Well, "beautiful" is a relative term when it comes to babies. I mean, honestly... some babies have a face that only a mother can love. 
I think the long running joke was: "You're so ugly that when you came out in the delivery room... the doctor slapped your mom instead." ;) 

But you are absolutely right. Babies look a lot more "normal" nowadays compared to miniature balding men. They are nightmare fuel, I tell ya. :no:
Reply
:iconloffy0:
Loffy0 Featured By Owner Feb 19, 2019  Hobbyist Photographer
:rofl: Never heard that one!

Yes :)
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Feb 19, 2019  Hobbyist General Artist
You haven't? Too bad! :rofl:
But now you have! And you can use it on other people now! :XD:
Reply
:iconloffy0:
Loffy0 Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2019  Hobbyist Photographer
I will remember it for sure :rofl: Thanks! I will make sure to use it =p
Reply
:iconcreepypastafangirl06:
CreepyPastaFangirl06 Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I started reading out of curiosity, saying "Can't be that interesting" and not long into it, I was hooked. Good job.
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
I am so very glad to hear that you decided to stick with the article! :D
And I am really glad that I was able to keep your attention. I hope it has been generally interesting to you! :)
Reply
:iconcreepypastafangirl06:
CreepyPastaFangirl06 Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Oh, it was. I had always wondered, "Why the ugly man baby?"
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Well... now you know! ;) 
And now you can go out and educate others about the ugly man-babies!!! 
Reply
:iconbellagbear:
BellaGBear Featured By Owner Edited Nov 21, 2018  Student Artisan Crafter
This was super interesting! I started reading this article out for a laugh, but it was actuallt very informative, bravo BRAVO! Thank you! Thank you! . It totally makes sense and I will totally use this new knowledge to come across as more of a smart-ass than I already am :laughing: :imsmart: 

I like art history as well, but now kinda mad we never learned about this in high school (although learning about rock music was pretty cool as well). 

The recurrent time in my work in a wish for happiness, comfort and freedom I think :thinking:,  which sounds a bit contradictory but isn't maybe. Who knows. But it's all a bit symbolic, because I don't like to be obvious. And your work?


And an art-history related question that occupies my mind is slightly related to this one: cause if you have like an example of for example a building or a cow, or a group of people, why is the perspective always so messed up? You can see how it's supposed to be. The 'invention'  of perspective has always wondered me, because it's not like how our eyes saw buildings changed when that happened. Or is that also a case of preformationism?

And a random song, cause why not: www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOnFwp…
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:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for your response! :D
I am so very glad to hear that you find it interesting. I wasn't expecting so many great responses to this article. I was just like you, I wrote it for fun, but it sounds like a lot of people liked it! ^^; 

I never properly learned art history. What I knew I learned from books. I would love to go to a class and learn about rock music. That sounds like a lot of fun! :XD: 

I think a wish for happiness, comfort and freedom is something that's quite natural and not at all contradictory. I think that's something that everybody wants. And nothing wrong with being symbolic as well. Sometimes the message is best conveyed under an alternative route instead of directly. As for me... I don't know if I have a theme or symbolism in my work. At least I don't quite see it myself. ^^; 

Thanks for asking this question! :) This one is something I can answer as well. 
Perspective in painting was first "invented" in the 14th century. And it took a long time to turn into what we call "perspective" today. When you are looking at the world through symbols, you don't have the need to be realistic. Just like with "Baby Jesus", the artists think they are looking at the world as how it ought to be and not how it really is. If you are interested in the history of perspective in painting, I think you are going to like this article: www.op-art.co.uk/history/persp…

Now that's an interesting video! ^^; Thanks a million! (It's funny seeing Elijah Wood as a normal person and not a hobbit! )
Reply
:iconbellagbear:
BellaGBear Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2018  Student Artisan Crafter
thanks for your reply! Will check the article :)
Reply
:iconafricanobserver:
AfricanObserver Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2018  Hobbyist Photographer
This triggers a thought about the making of art and the costs thereof - still an issue today. Back then, the church-state held all the cards, but as you point out, things were a little tight, and starving to death was quite easy, particularly if some bunch of hyped up invaders burnt your crops. The resources had to work hard to justify the investment.
We live in a far more 'resource rich' world today. Infant mortality rate is an easy and relevant measure. There are resources to experiment with.

But I still struggle with what I see as 'wasteful' art - high speed photos (pretty amazing actually) of buckets of milk thrown at people is a classic one. I know that art feeds dreams in poor and rich alike, but the way resources are used still phases me a bit.
And then how people get funding to work on projects for years. I think I am just a bit risk averse!

Thank you for a interesting interlude.

Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for writing! 

You are absolutely right. Back then art was dictated by those who can afford it (and back then it was basically the Church). As for the more experimental types of art that we see today... I have to say, I don't get it either. I think I have pretty much lost track of what it means to be art after the Impressionists (which is probably why I write about art history and not art "present"... ^^;) Between you and I, if you figure out what it means to be "art" in this day and age, please let me know. I'm curious myself. 

You are more than welcome! :thanks:
Reply
:iconmurhetta:
murhetta Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2018
Middle ages middle aged babies :iconwhatdidijustplz: 
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:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Pretty much it! :XD:
They don't call it the "middle ages" for nothing! ;)
Reply
:iconmurhetta:
murhetta Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2018
But is the receding hairline so necessary? haha
Also, the grown-up Jesus paintings show him with lots of hair, why is it?
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Oh dear me, no. The receding hairline is never necessary! Never! :shakefist:

You know, I am not fully sure why people think a dude with shoulder-length hair is the right way to go. But I do know why Jesus is usually drawn the way he is now. It came from a document called "The Letter of Lentulus". Letulus was said to be the Roman overseer of Judea before Pontius Pilate. And in this letter, Lentulus described Jesus as: "His hair is of the colour of the ripe hazel-nut, straight down to the ears, but below the ears wavy and curled, with a bluish and bright reflection, flowing over his shoulders. It is parted in two on the top of the head, after the pattern of the Nazarene's. His brow is smooth and very cheerful with a face without wrinkle or spot, embellished by a slightly reddish complexion. His nose and mouth are faultless. His beard is abundant, of the colour of his hair, not long, but divided at the chin. "

The long hair, beard and spotless look all came from this letter found in 1474. I hope this helps! :D
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:iconmurhetta:
murhetta Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2018
Oh it makes sense he would look "perfect" :hmm: I always thought it might be some kind of symbolism  
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
It really all comes down to symbolism, I find. 
It's almost unfortunate, once you think of it. We would rather use symbols instead of what is right in front of our eyes sometimes. But I guess that's the choice someone has made in the past, right? ^^;
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:iconmurhetta:
murhetta Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2018
Yes but i guess it adds to the mysticism of the whole religious ideas :shrug: rvmp 
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:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
I suppose it does. 
... but no one said mysticism is meant to look like ugly man-babies... ^^;
Reply
(1 Reply)
:icontinselfire:
Tinselfire Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2018
  • Have you encountered anything that's as inexplicable as these "ugly babies" that you have always wanted to ask about? Let us know! :) (Smile)
Sort of.

Work a lot with historical anthros, and the middle ages with the saturation of Christian imagery presents one touchy issue.
In a world where everybody is a furry animal, what species would Jesus be?
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
That's a great question! 

I think part of anthros is about how people perceive the animals - as in the "lore and legend" attached to the animals that form the first "gut feeling" we have towards them. Take, for example, doves give off a very different gut feeling than vultures. Lions also give a very different set of emotions than lambs. In light of this presumption (and mind, this is just my best educated guess), I would say that the animal that symbolizes Jesus would most likely be sheep. After all, even St. John  the Apostle called him "The Lamb of God" in the gospels. The other one possibility would mostly likely to be a goat - and this goes back to the "scapegoat" tradition where one goat is left to carry the sins of the people afield (Barnabas) and one is sacrificed for the good of the community (Jesus). 

That's just my take. I would be interested in hearing yours. :)
Reply
:icontinselfire:
Tinselfire Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2018
Oh dear... please forgive the very late reply. Lots of things happened at once, and my ongoing correspondence got, well, eclipsed.

That makes a lot of sense. After all, the gospels are full of animal imagery, and both sheep and goats are quite mundane animals - ubiquitous enough to have a wide appeal largely everywhere. And seeing how the medieval christian language, both visual and verbal, is one of symbolism and implications, the description as the "lamb" rather than the "sheep" marking him as the son of god cannot be ignored.
And you may be surprised to hear I reached much the same conclusion; although with quite a different path there.

I avoid marking nationalities by species (not just a touchy matter, but at its worst just lazy writing), but try to keep historical anthros species that existed in their region at the time. With the exception of samaritans - canine, to create opposition to make the parable of the good Samaritan make sense - paint Western semitic peoples as ovine or caprine, with the historical Yeshu ben Yosef himself presumably having been a ram.
However, through Greek and Roman influence, the story of Saint Christopher (who in that setting is not just dog-headed but a wolfdog), and medieval desire to distance from judaism, the story has mutated so that the Jesus of world christendom is eventually portrayed as canine.

Have yet to actually draw them, though. Perhaps it can be a touchy subject.
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Don't worry about being late, there's nothing wrong with that. Heaven knows, I am later than most people when it comes to responses! ^^; 

I like your line of reasoning, too! And it really is rather interesting that we have come to the same decision despite the separate paths that we have taken. I actually am not very well-versed in the anthro world. I have always found it fascinating how some characters were designed from which species. It's actually lovely reading your line of reasoning. If you ever get these historical anthros drawn, I would love to see them! :) 
Reply
:iconedwardsotherside:
EdwardsOtherSide Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you for the art history! It certainly expanded on what I had been aware of.

But...
Come on, doc!  You've seen a baby less than a day old.  The are only beautiful to their families. 
;) (Wink) 
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Sure, I have. I have seen babies as they come out. 
Heck, I have seen so many of them they don't look ugly to me anymore. ^^; But these kids... that's another story. Miniature balding-men-with-a-scowl is still kinda ugly-creepy to me! 

Thank you for your kind words. I am glad to be able to expand on what you already know! :thanks:
Reply
:iconcraftsbyblue:
craftsbyblue Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2018  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Thank you so much for writing this! You answered a pressing question perfectly, along with any follow up questions I had (like how we got out of the adult baby phase) :thanks:

Great discussion questions as well :nod:
For recurrent themes in my art, I feel like my art reflects a desire for constant self-improvement and experimentation xD. I think I’m fine with both for jewelry but prefer naturalistic in most other mediums :nod:
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
You are more than welcome! I am glad to be able to answer your question(s) for you! :love:

Thanks for the answer, too! :thanks: 
I can see your drive for self-improvement and that certainly shows from your work. As for the preference for naturalistic work... I can personally get behind that idea. I think Nature is the greatest muse we can get as artists. And it's a noble cause to try to get naturalistic. :nod:
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:iconcraftsbyblue:
craftsbyblue Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2018  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
:hug: :hug:

You are welcome :)!
I'm really glad you see that in my works :thanks:
I agree, nature is the greatest muse, and it's nice to show appreciation for nature through art :nod:
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
I sure do! :nod: 

At the end of the day, the world we live in is probably going to be our perpetual muse. Our daily interaction with the world around is makes up for a lot of our sensory input (and hopefully sparks of inspiration). I like to think we'll always find ways to be inspired by nature. :nod:
Reply
:iconkirawra:
KiRAWRa Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2018
Finally a long-sought answer to this hilarious question! Thank you so much for providing this insight!
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
You are more than welcome! :D
You know... I had no idea how many people had the same question floating in their heads before I wrote this article! 
Reply
:iconaquavarin:
AquaVarin Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Is it the same deal with weird-looking lions as well (Saint Jerome and the lion)? or is it just the lack of photo reference so painters had to paint based on written description?
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Most people have never seen a lion in the past - so all they had to go with were descriptions. This is most likely why people think "Unicorn" is actually a rhinoceros ( think of it: four-legs, horse-like, got a horn on the top of its head...) and the Leviathan is actually just a hippo (Lives in water, has a gaping maw and giant teeth...). It's actually not very far-fetched. The word "Hippopotamus" means "river horse" in Greek. And it's really easy for someone who has never seen a hippo before to think of a "river-horse" being something completely different from a hippo. 

On the other hand, symbolic iconography likes to anthropomorphosize anything that might be remotely sentient. This means a lot of the lions would be drawn with a man's face because in the legend, the lion was obviously sentient enough to look for help and eventually befriended St. Jerome. 

I hope this helps to answer your question! 
Reply
:iconaquavarin:
AquaVarin Featured By Owner Nov 14, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
It does, thank you very much! :heart:
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:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
I am very glad to hear that! :aww:
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:iconthystyn:
Thystyn Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
I've also wondered why the babies were so goddamn ugly, and now I have an answer... of sorts.  So glad that times have changed.  Thanks for the article.
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeah, I am so very glad that things have changed, too! ^^; 

I am glad that I can give you some kind of an answer (I know, it's long-winded and hard to put into a nutshell... ^^;). I hope it's still useful, though! 
Reply
:iconshesvii:
Shesvii Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2018  Professional Traditional Artist
Morose looking mothers :iconlmfao-plz:
Very good article!! :clap: 
I enjoyed it a lot. I like the humour you put in it.
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
I am so very glad that you liked the article! :XD:
And hey, you gotta make this fun. There's no other way to look at horrifying-looking babies. ;)
Reply
:iconshesvii:
Shesvii Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2018  Professional Traditional Artist
I did, it's very informative and interesting.
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
I am glad to hear of it! :thanks:
Reply
:icondanubium:
Danubium Featured By Owner Nov 6, 2018
For every reference to "the Dark Ages", a historian goes berserk and shoots up a school.

Please, think of children.
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
As a medical historian, I haven't found any compulsion to go berserk yet. You must be thinking of some other historians with a much shorter temper fuse. 

Be that as it may, point taken. Unfortunately "Middle Ages" do not fit in the allowed length of the title. Therefore the title was and will stay as "Dark Ages" out of necessity. In the meantime, let's pray for the children.
Reply
:icondanubium:
Danubium Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2018
Unless I'm mistaken, "of Medieval art" would have fit the character limit, and the alleged necessity also carries over to the body of the text, making it clear where you stand regarding this heresy.
Thoughts and prayers aren't enough, we need historical term control!
Reply
:iconqueen-kitty:
Queen-Kitty Featured By Owner Nov 6, 2018   Photographer
This article is absolutely amazing, thank you for picking such an entertaining but also enlightening topic!
Reply
:iconsinistrosephosphate:
SinistrosePhosphate Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
I am so glad to hear that you liked it! :thanks: 
You should thank TheGalleryOfEve  for asking the question in the first place! :)
Reply
:iconruddud:
RudDud Featured By Owner Nov 6, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
And here I was thinking it was just cause they used adult models for their baby paintings.
Reply
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These are fairly significant updates to DeviantArt Eclipse that we look forward to communicating and sharing with you all in the upcoming weeks, so keep your eyes open! Without further delay, here are this week’s changes and bug fixes:

Change Log

Embedding deviations and pasting thumb codes are back! Try pasting a deviation URL in a comment or a journal! (Popular request!)You can now include a deviant’s avatar using the “Insert Emote” button. (Popular request!)The top navigation bar now has a light theme!You can now search for a specific artist’s deviations and other content by searching for “ @username ”When adding a deviations to a comment or journal using gallery mode, the editor now shows the limit and number of deviations chosen.Fixed issue where Feedback would not be sorted correctly after you reach the end of each “page” of results.Deleting deviations, status updates, journals now properly reloads the page.Artist hover cards now appear when on usernames, not just avatars.When rolling over your own avatar, the hover card no longer says “Message” and “Watch”Adjusted size of the artist hover card to be more compactOn donation pools, the number 0 would overlay on the word “Goal” when you initially add the section.When hovering over default donation pool bar, it shows “NaN%”.The donation pool’s meter displayed as full when they were empty (0/0).

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Submitted on
November 6, 2018
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