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1951 by seruven 1951 :iconseruven:seruven 1 0 Uzak Sehir by seruven Uzak Sehir :iconseruven:seruven 0 0 Emanet Sehir by seruven Emanet Sehir :iconseruven:seruven 8 0 Aglayan Abdulcanbaz by seruven Aglayan Abdulcanbaz :iconseruven:seruven 7 3 Dumankara, Hayat Bir Yangindi by seruven Dumankara, Hayat Bir Yangindi :iconseruven:seruven 9 2 Enki Bilal in Istanbul by seruven Enki Bilal in Istanbul :iconseruven:seruven 8 13 Greyfurt-Turkish Fanzine p8 by seruven Greyfurt-Turkish Fanzine p8 :iconseruven:seruven 6 0 Greyfurt-Turkish Fanzine p7 by seruven Greyfurt-Turkish Fanzine p7 :iconseruven:seruven 5 3 Greyfurt-Turkish Fanzine p5 by seruven Greyfurt-Turkish Fanzine p5 :iconseruven:seruven 3 0 Greyfurt-Turkish Fanzine p4 by seruven Greyfurt-Turkish Fanzine p4 :iconseruven:seruven 5 3 Greyfurt-Turkish Fanzine p6 by seruven Greyfurt-Turkish Fanzine p6 :iconseruven:seruven 5 2 Greyfurt-Turkish Fanzine p3 by seruven Greyfurt-Turkish Fanzine p3 :iconseruven:seruven 6 1 Greyfurt-Turkish Fanzine p2 by seruven Greyfurt-Turkish Fanzine p2 :iconseruven:seruven 3 0 Greyfurt-Turkish Fanzine by seruven Greyfurt-Turkish Fanzine :iconseruven:seruven 14 6 Frankfurt Book Fair Picture 17 by seruven Frankfurt Book Fair Picture 17 :iconseruven:seruven 1 4 Frankfurt Book Fair Picture 16 by seruven Frankfurt Book Fair Picture 16 :iconseruven:seruven 1 0

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Paladins' Tales: Fairy Forest by Lipatov
Mature content
Paladins' Tales: Fairy Forest :iconlipatov:Lipatov 83 7
Water lady by tonysandoval
Mature content
Water lady :icontonysandoval:tonysandoval 123 10
DYLAN DOG 388 Cover by GigiCave DYLAN DOG 388 Cover :icongigicave:GigiCave 224 2 Pharah by umigraphics Pharah :iconumigraphics:umigraphics 353 6 Paladins' Tales: Paladin on the Brezales by Lipatov Paladins' Tales: Paladin on the Brezales :iconlipatov:Lipatov 126 4 SD20171114... by PatBoutin SD20171114... :iconpatboutin:PatBoutin 135 11 Scraport by Datem Scraport :icondatem:Datem 1,008 20 Sky buoys by Datem Sky buoys :icondatem:Datem 341 3 Rivers of London: Action at a Distance #2 cover by RobertHack Rivers of London: Action at a Distance #2 cover :iconroberthack:RobertHack 13 1 Rain encounter by snatti89 Rain encounter :iconsnatti89:snatti89 1,045 13 Queen of Hell by PaulAbrams Queen of Hell :iconpaulabrams:PaulAbrams 95 3 The Sister of Dragon by Lipatov The Sister of Dragon :iconlipatov:Lipatov 129 3 Ninja. by PascalCampion Ninja. :iconpascalcampion:PascalCampion 294 15 Cold Cursed by MarcBrunet Cold Cursed :iconmarcbrunet:MarcBrunet 820 13 Untitled by berkozturk Untitled :iconberkozturk:berkozturk 88 7 RedAnt G3F Min Ling P1 by REDANTArts RedAnt G3F Min Ling P1 :iconredantarts:REDANTArts 94 6

Activity


Comics and comic strips have been published in Turkey for the last one hundred odd years with some interruptions, and for eighty years on a continuous basis. There have been some remarkable local productions published during this period. Yet, when comics are brought up in Turkey, the first creations that come to mind are those of foreign origin. The foremost reason for this is that comics production in Turkey has never developed into a full-fledged industry branch. Local comics that were financed and supported by newspaper publishers could not rival foreign publications, neither on a quantitative nor on a qualitative basis. Therefore it is of no surprise that even during the years 1955-1975, generally known as the golden age of comics in Turkey, no locally produced children’s comics attained widespread popularity.

 Still, the country saw the creation of many significant comics, such as Karaoğlan by Suat YalazAbdülcanbaz by Turhan Selçuk, and Sezgin Burak‘s Tarkan. In this period, comics were published daily in the form of comic strips in newspapers, which would mostly be compiled in full-length comic books after their daily publication. At a time when magazines for children could survive even on small sales figures, cartoonists turned first and foremost to periodicals, thus reinforcing the presence of comics across their pages. With growing income and influence, the artists were then able to develop their work more deeply, allowing their creations from then on to incorporate narrative forms according to the needs of the publication and readers’ profiles.

Turkish authors’ focus on historical themes, extravagant prose about heroic figures, and eroticism seem to have met readers’ expectations as well as publishers’, as these elements have firmly established themselves over the years. Traditionally, almost every newspaper (HürriyetMilliyetAkşam, etc.) has reserved a space for comic strips, especially historical ones. The benefits to newspapers have not come solely from the growing interest in this genre—comic strips have contributed to newspaper design on the visual level, too. Due to insufficient printing technology before the 1970s, photographs were only scarcely used. Thus, artists who worked both with the newspapers and in the comic strip genre were able to shape the visual aspect of the Turkish press. Caricatures, vignettes, portraits, illustrations and various decorations were all used in place of photographs. Comics artists (such as Suat Yalaz, Bedri Koraman, and Turhan Selçuk) generally received good salaries and the comic strips they produced returned high royalties.

With the introduction of modern printers to Turkey, however, photographs soon took over on the visual level. This transformation would reduce both the standing of comic strips within the newspaper industry as well as the royalties paid for their creation. Due to subsiding royalties, newspaper illustrators and graphic artists gradually turned their attention away from the production of comic strips, and despite the continued importance of comic strips since then, they would never again match the high level of popularity they enjoyed leading up to the 1970s.

The evolution of comics in the highly popular magazine Gırgır is once again due to favorable economic conditions and the financial support from newspaper owners. It all began with the development of offset web printing facilities by famous media owner Haldun Simavi, which represented a great step forward in the evolution of print media. Up until then, it had been virtually impossible to produce hundreds of thousands of newspapers and distribute them across the entire country in a single day. But with his new, fast-printing facilities, Simavi revolutionized the press and printing industry by producing massive amounts of newspapers and magazines rich in photographs and illustrations. At the onset of the 1970s he also experimented with an erotic, comical, and to some extent political humour magazine—Gırgır. Along with its strong cultural and political identity, Gırgır’s commercial success cannot be disregarded. The emergence of many comics creators on the national level and their existence up until today is directly attributable to Gırgır’s strong sales and economic success. The magazine opened up a new path for artists who had previously been working mainly for newspapers. Many young people were able to make a good living in this way through their art, and under such favorable conditions, other magazines with the same format as Gırgır, sporting caricatures and humorous comic strips, have also become popular.

Nearly all the comics from the last forty years that have secured a place in the hearts and minds of the Turkish belong to the humor genre. The vast majority (Oğuz Aral‘s Utanmaz Adam, or “Shameless Man,” Küçük Adam by İlban Ertem, En Kahraman Rıdvan by Bülent ArabaciogluGaddar Davut by Nuri Kurtcebe, etc.) are based on irony, drawing heavily on exaggeratedly heroic characters and adventure-filled episodes by utilizing satirical language. Gırgır and other humour magazines (ÇarşafLimonFırt) that emerged at the same time reached total sales figures of one million copies. Such a windfall of sales, as well as the magazines’ variety, had a great impact on comics, such that the richness of visual styles and narrative forms rose to an unforeseen level. Galip TekinSuat GönülayKemal Aratan and Ergün Gündüz were among the most productive comics artists of those years and the ones that most strongly influenced the following generations of artists.

However, such burgeoning quality and quantity was abruptly reversed by the heavy erosion of sales caused by the negative impact of television, so that by the first half of the 1990s, sales of print media had fallen by 80 percent compared with figures from just a decade before. Confronted with the growth of commercial TV channels, many magazines (LemanDeli, etc.) turned against mainstream taste and put a new emphasis on stories that could not be aired on TV. This evolution not only marginalized magazines in general but also affected comics, investing them with a rather grotesque touch.

 The most important magazine of that period was L-Manyak. The main aim of the magazine is humor and all that relates to buffoonery. Openly obscene and scatological in character, it scorns the “sensitivities” of urban society. Typical targets of the magazine are predators, braggarts, the rich, gluttons, ambitious businessmen, and those who use their sexual attraction to climb up the social ladder. As opposed to its predecessors, however, one topic is not touched upon: politics. The cover focuses on grotesque characters and comical representations of violence and various sexual practices. Decidely vulgar in nature, the magazine’s humor does however serve as constructive criticism. Mainstays of the stories in L-Manyak include the use of violence against oppression and the oppressors, the wish to escape the masses, mistrust towards certain political agendas, strong and insatiable sexual desire, hedonism, general mistrust towards others, and indifference to money.

 Nowadays comics in Turkey are styled on the narrative model of L-Manyak. It is thus important to understand the common aesthetic preferences at the base of the L-Manyak trend: as opposed to the very minimalistic approach cultivated by legendary editor Oğuz Aral, most editors now prefer drawings against a detail-loaded, photorealistic background and tiled page designs. Kötü Kedi Şerafettin (Şerafettin the Bad Cat) by Bülent Üstün showcases the punky past of the author and his aesthetic rebellion. In the L-Manyak “Martyrs” series by Mrmo Termbelçizer, the author recounts stories about his artist friends who find death in many different ways. Another subcultural story by influential artist Oky (Oktay Gençer), Cihangir’de Bi Ev (“A House in Cihangir”), revolves around a quarter of Istanbul, where Cihangir is shown as a bohemian space of the city, with a focus on adolescents’ sexual and emotional relations. Other typical examples of this period are Cengiz Üstün’s grotesque works that invert the logic of horror movies, like Kunteper Canavarı (The Kunteper Monster), and Gürcan Yurt’s Turkish take on Robinson Crusoe (Robinson Crusoe ve Cuma, or Robinson Crusoe and Friday). Other comics artists whose various works have recently made a splash are Bahadır BaruterKenan Yarar and Ersin Karabulut.

Finally it is of interest to expand on a few artists who have become prominent in the course of eighty years of local comics production. Suat Yalaz’s swashbuckling serial Karaoğlan (1962) and Turhan Selçuk’s formidable Turk in the last days of the Ottoman Empire, Abdülcanbaz (1957), were able to establish themselves on various platforms and keep up with the times, thus becoming classics in the Turkish comics scene. Sezgin Burak’s Tarkan is interesting because of its masterful originality and creative settings. Although Ratip Tahir Burak is considered by many to be a great painter who stands out for his artful drawing rather than his stories, he has become a model for the entire Gırgır generation. Oğuz Aral’s Utanmaz Adam has become a model as well for its successful scripts and well-conceived storylines. Engin Ergönültaş, born in 1951, deeply influenced the generations to come by creatively employing the original character of hınzır (originally meaning “swine,” “pork”; here in the sense of a boorish and unfeeling person) and through his literary visuality. Much of the production of today’s Turkish comics artists is deeply rooted in Ergönültaş’s influential artwork. With perhaps much more still to come.
[Levent Cantek]

  • Listening to: Arto Tuncboyaciyan
  • Reading: 1951
  • Watching: Babylon Berlin

Grafik Roman, Magdurun Dilini Söyler

Cizgi romanlar, ekseriyetle erkek ve muktedir kahramanlarin seruvenlerini anlatir. O kahramanlar kurtarir, alt eder, kazanir ve hicbir surette kaybetmezler. Soloúp’un grafik romani, gerceklere, evlerinden göce zorlanan insanlarin hatirladiklarina dayandigi icin böylesi bir hayal ve idealle ilgilenmiyor. Gucunu ve yenilikciligini buradan aliyor, insancil bir referansi var, kim haklidan cok kimin aci cektigini resmetmeye calisiyor.

derinhakikatler.blogspot.com.t…

Buyumek isteyen cocuklarin yurek gumburtusu

Ferri, kendi kusaginin butun ureticilerine benzer bicimde 30’lu yillarda okudugu Amerikan cizgi romanlarini, cizer olarak Alex Raymond’u izleyen, onlardan ilham alan biriydi. Zagor’un sonu kavgayla biten, yumruklariyla etrafindakileri metrelerce ileriye savurdugu hararetli bir öfkesi vardir. Ferri, bu cocuksu heyecani, o dehsetli patlamayi -hic abartmiyorum- bayilarak ciziyordu. Siyah beyazin dagilimi, cininin siddetlenmesi, fircanin belirginlesmesi, bir kareden digerine gecen suratli ardisiklik, dizinin her zaman en basarili sahneleri oldu. Bu kadar hizli cizen, bu kadar cok cizen birinden deha ölcusunde biriciklik beklenemez. 

derinhakikatler.blogspot.com.t…


Sizofren ve arzulu bir tisört
           

Cizgili Tisört, Ersin Karabulut’un yakin dönemde cikan Sevgili Gunluk (2009) ve Amatör (2013) albumlerinde olusturdugu dunyanin devami olmus. Yine arzu ve kötulugun enerjisine, yine yalan dolan, hile ve desisede odaklaniyor ve yine meselesini bir pembe dizi gerilimi icinde anlatiyor. İlginc olan, kendisini kahramanlastirdigi, otobiyografik nitelikli Sandik İci cizgi romanini dolayli bicimde hikayesinin merkezine tasimasi. 

derinhakikatler.blogspot.com.t…


Dislanmislarin Savasi

Yeni nesil hikâyelerin ters yuz ettigi kaliplar var; Kyle, icine seytan girmis bir cocugu yumrukluyor örnegin. Manzara, öyle ya da böyle, bir cocugun bir yetiskinden ölduresiye dayak yemesi; ebeveynleri ve pedagoglari dehsete dusurecek sertlikte ustelik… Ote yandan hikâye, temelde genc bir okura hitap ediyor, kanlar icinde kalan Joshua, bu okura yakin bir yasta… 

derinhakikatler.blogspot.com.t…

 

Tepe’nin Kayip Ruyasi

Tepe, bir yolculuk ve takip cizgi romani; ilgincligi, magara resimlerini andiran bir görsel bicimsellik tasimasi. Firat Yasa, bir önceki calismasi olan Avci Nun’da (2013) bu cizgiyi kullanmis, naif ve arkaik duran bir estetikle hikayesini guclendirmisti. İc derinligi olmayan, figuratif bir hareketlilik ve monokrom bir duraganligi göz alici renklerle baskalastirmis, ortaya özgun bir aura cikarmisti

derinhakikatler.blogspot.com.t…


Tenten, tarihsiz bir edebiyat ülkesinde!

Romanciligiyla bildigimiz Tom McCarthy’nin Tenten’le ilgili bir kitabi yayimlandi. Eksik söylemis oldum, kitap sadece Tenten’i icermiyor; bir yandan cizgi romanin kliselerini, hikaye izleklerini ve degisimini anlatirken diger yandan yazarin “Hergé uzerine yazarsam Freud, Derrida ve daha bir suru insan uzerine yazmis olurum; ayrica öylesi daha eglenceli olacaktir,” fikriyle ele alinmis bir deneme. Cizgi roman, en cok edebiyata ve sinemaya benzetilir. Söz sanatlarini kullanmakla birlikte edebiyat degildir.  

derinhakikatler.blogspot.com.t…

 

Pembe İyimser bir Renktir

Nasil bir hikâye Arakci? Eskiden sanat dergilerinde kucuk hikâye derlerdi, simdi minimal demeyi tercih ediyoruz. Cizgi roman tarihinde bu tur anlatilarin kendine yer bulmasi hele edebiyatla kiyaslanirsa cok ama cok yenidir. En fazla elli yil geriye gidebiliriz. Cizgi romanlar suratli, mutlaka bir olaganustuluge dayanan tahkiyelerdir. Bu anlayisin disina cikmak, anlatiyi yavaslatmak veya hikâyeyi bilerek tamamlamamak, endustrinin isleyisi geregi cok da kolay olmadi.

derinhakikatler.blogspot.com.t…

 

Gaiman Masallari

Neil Gaiman, global dunyanin coksatar yazarlarindan biri. Epik dile olan hâkimiyeti, hikâye evreni kurabilme ustaligi, aktuelle mesafesi ve ölculu muhalifligiyle uzun yillar populerligini koruyacak, öyle anlasiliyor. Genc kalabilen veya genc okura hikâyeler anlatabilen bir yazar. Fantastik edebiyatin icinde kalarak korku turunun populer referanslarini kullaniyor. Olum, ölumden sonraki hayat, din mitolojisi, insan disi varliklar ilgisini cekiyor. Gaiman, pek cok unlu korku edebiyatcisi gibi insanlardan cok yaratiklara yakin durmayi seviyor. İyilik ve kötuluk meselesine odaklandigi icin insan tekinin kibir, hirs, haset ve acimasizligini kiyasiya elestiriyor.

derinhakikatler.blogspot.com.t…

  • Listening to: Arto Tuncboyaciyan
  • Reading: 1951
  • Watching: Babylon Berlin
1951
Yeni grafik romanımız / our new graphic novel
Levent Cantek & Sefa sofuoğlu
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Comics and comic strips have been published in Turkey for the last one hundred odd years with some interruptions, and for eighty years on a continuous basis. There have been some remarkable local productions published during this period. Yet, when comics are brought up in Turkey, the first creations that come to mind are those of foreign origin. The foremost reason for this is that comics production in Turkey has never developed into a full-fledged industry branch. Local comics that were financed and supported by newspaper publishers could not rival foreign publications, neither on a quantitative nor on a qualitative basis. Therefore it is of no surprise that even during the years 1955-1975, generally known as the golden age of comics in Turkey, no locally produced children’s comics attained widespread popularity.

 Still, the country saw the creation of many significant comics, such as Karaoğlan by Suat YalazAbdülcanbaz by Turhan Selçuk, and Sezgin Burak‘s Tarkan. In this period, comics were published daily in the form of comic strips in newspapers, which would mostly be compiled in full-length comic books after their daily publication. At a time when magazines for children could survive even on small sales figures, cartoonists turned first and foremost to periodicals, thus reinforcing the presence of comics across their pages. With growing income and influence, the artists were then able to develop their work more deeply, allowing their creations from then on to incorporate narrative forms according to the needs of the publication and readers’ profiles.

Turkish authors’ focus on historical themes, extravagant prose about heroic figures, and eroticism seem to have met readers’ expectations as well as publishers’, as these elements have firmly established themselves over the years. Traditionally, almost every newspaper (HürriyetMilliyetAkşam, etc.) has reserved a space for comic strips, especially historical ones. The benefits to newspapers have not come solely from the growing interest in this genre—comic strips have contributed to newspaper design on the visual level, too. Due to insufficient printing technology before the 1970s, photographs were only scarcely used. Thus, artists who worked both with the newspapers and in the comic strip genre were able to shape the visual aspect of the Turkish press. Caricatures, vignettes, portraits, illustrations and various decorations were all used in place of photographs. Comics artists (such as Suat Yalaz, Bedri Koraman, and Turhan Selçuk) generally received good salaries and the comic strips they produced returned high royalties.

With the introduction of modern printers to Turkey, however, photographs soon took over on the visual level. This transformation would reduce both the standing of comic strips within the newspaper industry as well as the royalties paid for their creation. Due to subsiding royalties, newspaper illustrators and graphic artists gradually turned their attention away from the production of comic strips, and despite the continued importance of comic strips since then, they would never again match the high level of popularity they enjoyed leading up to the 1970s.

The evolution of comics in the highly popular magazine Gırgır is once again due to favorable economic conditions and the financial support from newspaper owners. It all began with the development of offset web printing facilities by famous media owner Haldun Simavi, which represented a great step forward in the evolution of print media. Up until then, it had been virtually impossible to produce hundreds of thousands of newspapers and distribute them across the entire country in a single day. But with his new, fast-printing facilities, Simavi revolutionized the press and printing industry by producing massive amounts of newspapers and magazines rich in photographs and illustrations. At the onset of the 1970s he also experimented with an erotic, comical, and to some extent political humour magazine—Gırgır. Along with its strong cultural and political identity, Gırgır’s commercial success cannot be disregarded. The emergence of many comics creators on the national level and their existence up until today is directly attributable to Gırgır’s strong sales and economic success. The magazine opened up a new path for artists who had previously been working mainly for newspapers. Many young people were able to make a good living in this way through their art, and under such favorable conditions, other magazines with the same format as Gırgır, sporting caricatures and humorous comic strips, have also become popular.

Nearly all the comics from the last forty years that have secured a place in the hearts and minds of the Turkish belong to the humor genre. The vast majority (Oğuz Aral‘s Utanmaz Adam, or “Shameless Man,” Küçük Adam by İlban Ertem, En Kahraman Rıdvan by Bülent ArabaciogluGaddar Davut by Nuri Kurtcebe, etc.) are based on irony, drawing heavily on exaggeratedly heroic characters and adventure-filled episodes by utilizing satirical language. Gırgır and other humour magazines (ÇarşafLimonFırt) that emerged at the same time reached total sales figures of one million copies. Such a windfall of sales, as well as the magazines’ variety, had a great impact on comics, such that the richness of visual styles and narrative forms rose to an unforeseen level. Galip TekinSuat GönülayKemal Aratan and Ergün Gündüz were among the most productive comics artists of those years and the ones that most strongly influenced the following generations of artists.

However, such burgeoning quality and quantity was abruptly reversed by the heavy erosion of sales caused by the negative impact of television, so that by the first half of the 1990s, sales of print media had fallen by 80 percent compared with figures from just a decade before. Confronted with the growth of commercial TV channels, many magazines (LemanDeli, etc.) turned against mainstream taste and put a new emphasis on stories that could not be aired on TV. This evolution not only marginalized magazines in general but also affected comics, investing them with a rather grotesque touch.

 The most important magazine of that period was L-Manyak. The main aim of the magazine is humor and all that relates to buffoonery. Openly obscene and scatological in character, it scorns the “sensitivities” of urban society. Typical targets of the magazine are predators, braggarts, the rich, gluttons, ambitious businessmen, and those who use their sexual attraction to climb up the social ladder. As opposed to its predecessors, however, one topic is not touched upon: politics. The cover focuses on grotesque characters and comical representations of violence and various sexual practices. Decidely vulgar in nature, the magazine’s humor does however serve as constructive criticism. Mainstays of the stories in L-Manyak include the use of violence against oppression and the oppressors, the wish to escape the masses, mistrust towards certain political agendas, strong and insatiable sexual desire, hedonism, general mistrust towards others, and indifference to money.

 Nowadays comics in Turkey are styled on the narrative model of L-Manyak. It is thus important to understand the common aesthetic preferences at the base of the L-Manyak trend: as opposed to the very minimalistic approach cultivated by legendary editor Oğuz Aral, most editors now prefer drawings against a detail-loaded, photorealistic background and tiled page designs. Kötü Kedi Şerafettin (Şerafettin the Bad Cat) by Bülent Üstün showcases the punky past of the author and his aesthetic rebellion. In the L-Manyak “Martyrs” series by Mrmo Termbelçizer, the author recounts stories about his artist friends who find death in many different ways. Another subcultural story by influential artist Oky (Oktay Gençer), Cihangir’de Bi Ev (“A House in Cihangir”), revolves around a quarter of Istanbul, where Cihangir is shown as a bohemian space of the city, with a focus on adolescents’ sexual and emotional relations. Other typical examples of this period are Cengiz Üstün’s grotesque works that invert the logic of horror movies, like Kunteper Canavarı (The Kunteper Monster), and Gürcan Yurt’s Turkish take on Robinson Crusoe (Robinson Crusoe ve Cuma, or Robinson Crusoe and Friday). Other comics artists whose various works have recently made a splash are Bahadır BaruterKenan Yarar and Ersin Karabulut.

Finally it is of interest to expand on a few artists who have become prominent in the course of eighty years of local comics production. Suat Yalaz’s swashbuckling serial Karaoğlan (1962) and Turhan Selçuk’s formidable Turk in the last days of the Ottoman Empire, Abdülcanbaz (1957), were able to establish themselves on various platforms and keep up with the times, thus becoming classics in the Turkish comics scene. Sezgin Burak’s Tarkan is interesting because of its masterful originality and creative settings. Although Ratip Tahir Burak is considered by many to be a great painter who stands out for his artful drawing rather than his stories, he has become a model for the entire Gırgır generation. Oğuz Aral’s Utanmaz Adam has become a model as well for its successful scripts and well-conceived storylines. Engin Ergönültaş, born in 1951, deeply influenced the generations to come by creatively employing the original character of hınzır (originally meaning “swine,” “pork”; here in the sense of a boorish and unfeeling person) and through his literary visuality. Much of the production of today’s Turkish comics artists is deeply rooted in Ergönültaş’s influential artwork. With perhaps much more still to come.
[Levent Cantek]

  • Listening to: Arto Tuncboyaciyan
  • Reading: 1951
  • Watching: Babylon Berlin

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seruven
Seruven Dergisi
Turkey
Current Residence: Ankara, İzmir, İstanbul, Eskişehir, Kaf Dağı, Neverland...
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:iconlamuserie:
LaMuserie Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks for the watch !!!
www.facebook.com/Lamuserienet/
Bannier by LaMuserie  

Reply
:icongregtutorials:
GregTutorials Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2018
Hi there! I'm here trying to get smile from someone!
March has gone and April has come and I'm here to wish you a great month and I hope you accomplish everything you've set as a goal for this month!
Have a great day, week and month! :dance::hug::heart:
Reply
:iconseruven:
seruven Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2018
Wink/Razz Clap :happybounce: 
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:iconfreedige:
FREEdige Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2017  Professional General Artist
Teşekkürler:)
Reply
:iconhuseyinozkan:
huseyinozkan Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2015  Professional General Artist
teşekkürler:beer:
Reply
:iconsilveraxe:
Silveraxe Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Favlar için teşekkürler :)
Reply
:iconserhanyenilmez:
serhanyenilmez Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Favori için teşekkürler. :)
Reply
:iconturk-sanart:
turk-sanart Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2013
Grubun amacı türk sanatını dünya ile bütünleştirmek,zaman içinde yabancılarıda gruba dahil ederek dünyadaki türk algısını artıya çevirmek ..Bu amacın kıyısında iseniz buyrun kapı açık içeri dalın (:

:iconturksanart:
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:iconserhanyenilmez:
serhanyenilmez Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Favori için teşekkürler. :)
Reply
:iconsilveraxe:
Silveraxe Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Fav icin tesekkurler! :)
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