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T. rex reigns again by ScottHartman T. rex reigns again by ScottHartman
I actually did this about a year ago, but agreed to keep it under wraps until the paper made it to print. This version is also supposed to adorn my upgraded website, whenever I get the free time to finish that overhaul...

Anyways, it's Stan, which is why the head is so large. It should have just about all of the recent data for T. rex, and I probably won't be doing another 'rex for some time now, so hopefully you all enjoy it.

Edit: I should probably say something about the artistry angle (you can see how deeply invested I am with terms like "angle"). While it's no masterpiece, I think this is fairly easily my best work in terms of pose (it's not just a 3/4 rear view shot, but also introduces significant vanishing-point perspective to try and sell the scale) but also my use of different levels of detail to draw interest, and lighting that doesn't appear to have taken place during a product shoot on an overcast day.

These techniques are second nature to many of the fine artists on DA, but it was the first non-skeletal illustration I'd done in 2+ years, so I'm pretty happy all in all. Now I'll have to do something with a better background.
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:iconcreamclaw:
Creamclaw Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2015  Student Digital Artist
Wow, I love the designs on the tyrannosaur's tail! :)
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks :)
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:iconfredthedinosaurman:
FredtheDinosaurman Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2014  Student General Artist
AWESOOOOOOME!!!
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:icontraheripteryx:
Traheripteryx Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Wonderful!
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:iconkazuma27:
Kazuma27 Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Why i didn't faved it before it's a mistery indeed...
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:iconamadeus450:
amadeus450 Featured By Owner May 22, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
nice :D
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:icondino-mario:
Dino-Mario Featured By Owner May 11, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Hey,would you like to submit this into mah group???It's okay if you don't want:
[link]
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner May 14, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Sure, is it open for submissions?
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:icondino-mario:
Dino-Mario Featured By Owner May 14, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Yes it is
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:icondino-mario:
Dino-Mario Featured By Owner May 10, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
It's AWESOME!!!
By the way,i can't find the green version of this drawing
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner May 10, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
You can see it here: [link]
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:icondino-mario:
Dino-Mario Featured By Owner May 11, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks
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:icongeobrs:
geoBRS Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Excelent work, Very good perspective too!!
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:iconspuderific:
Spuderific Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2012
The american kings:
Elvis Presley, King of Rock & Roll
Richard Petty, King of Nascar racing
Michael Jackson, King of Pop
Tyrannosaurus Rex, King of Dinosaurs
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:iconteh-dino:
teh-dino Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Great illustration as always!
That was an interesting read, and it makes perfect sense. It always seemed to me that the caudal vertebrae had the potential to support some good-sized muscles; even when I was first drawing dinos back in elementary school, before I understood anatomy, I drew them with thick tails. Then I switched to skinny tails when I saw the pros drawing them that way. Guess I should have stuck with my instinct :p.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 19, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Yes and no. I've heard a lot of people say similar things, but a lot of people who used to draw them thicker also drew them with a very basic (and incorrect) circular cross-section, while the actual cross-sectional shape is more complicated.

I'm also seeing this with backs and necks - there will be lots of blog posts on this in coming months - but there have been some papers (rightly) suggesting that some people don't put enough muscle on these areas, but the response has been to simply drape the back or neck in rounded "balloon" blobs of flesh, which is not more correct.

The important thing is to follow the process, which over time tends to self-correct, rather than to just toss our hands up in the air and conclude that we were better off not trying to learn from comparative anatomy.

Thanks for the kind words!
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:iconthedrunkpixie:
TheDrunkPixie Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2011
it`s realy good!
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Thank you kindly.
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:iconsupergoji18:
supergoji18 Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2011  Student Traditional Artist
if t-rex was the perfect predator 65 million years ago, and it didn't die... what if it continued to evolve?
that is a thought that gives me nightmares (GULP).
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:iconmizz-colorzz:
Mizz-Colorzz Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2011   Digital Artist
don't worry! he'll probably evolve into.... a chicken :D well, maybe not, but the chicken do is the closest relitive of Rex which is still alive ;) didn't believe it until i saw it on natgeo... the poor guy :lol:
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:iconsupergoji18:
supergoji18 Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2011  Student Traditional Artist
a chicken... the greatest predator of all time evolving into a chicken... IMPOSSABLE!
All birds are the closest living relative to dinosaurs. and scientists say they are closer to raptors, not rex.
if they did evolve into a bird, it couldn't have been a chicken. maybe an eagle or really big bird like it, but not a chicken.
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:iconmizz-colorzz:
Mizz-Colorzz Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2011   Digital Artist
i wouldn't know :p i was just qoating the scientist of the program 'make me a dino' lol...
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:iconsupergoji18:
supergoji18 Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2011  Student Traditional Artist
no shame in that.
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:iconmizz-colorzz:
Mizz-Colorzz Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2011   Digital Artist
haha lol, imagine a gigantic chicken XD would be so stupid :P right?
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:iconsupergoji18:
supergoji18 Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2011  Student Traditional Artist
not compared to... THE GIANT CLAW. BUM BUM BAAAAA!!
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:iconmizz-colorzz:
Mizz-Colorzz Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2011   Digital Artist
OMG i'm so scared!!! save me king kong! bwhahahaha :XD: you know what else is scarry? little baby chickens!
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(1 Reply)
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Well, remember that "perfect" only makes sense within a given adaptive environment. Since the environments and prey would have kept changing, tyrannosaurs would have needed to evolve as well (as indeed they did leading up to T. rex).

Still, it is hard to imagine T. rex evolving into something even more "Rexy".
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:iconsupergoji18:
supergoji18 Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2011  Student Traditional Artist
whenever i think of a "super" t-rex, i think of one of these guys:
[link]
[link]
[link]
[link]
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:iconindigomagpie:
indigomagpie Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2011
Best way to make T. rex more dangerous to humans would probably have been to shrink it. I figure the most dangerous-sized predators, from a human perspective, are the 200-500 kg ones - too big to fight off the way people have fought off wolves and leopards, but small enough that a human makes a square meal, so they'll make an effort to chase you.

Sure, there's no way a human could fight off a full-sized T. rex without heavy artillery, but would it even bother trying to eat the human? It'd be like a human chasing a mouse - how much effort would you put into chasing one mouse as a source of meat?

So unless they hunted for sport...
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:iconsupergoji18:
supergoji18 Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2011  Student Traditional Artist
food is food. it wouldn't care if you were a compy, if it's hungry it eats. plus, it's because we are so small that he would probably chase after us. we won't offer him much of a challenge, so of course he will go after us. easier meat.

of course, that might not always be the case. if you put a healthy human and an old triceratops in front of a hungry tyrannosaurus, chances are that it will go for the triceratops.
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:iconamorousdino:
amorousdino Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2011  Student General Artist
:pissedoff: How come I never saw this one!!!!!!!!
:omg:
Nice one :D

Kinda reminds me of Rader's Stan kit :)

Luv it :D

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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Good observation! Not only did I work with Jon Rader on that sculpture (for those who don't know Rader, his website is here: [link] ), but I looked at my copy of it several times while I was working on the composition.
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:iconamorousdino:
amorousdino Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2011  Student General Artist
Ah, I see :D

I'm workin with him too (through da net :( ) for a commission ;) [link]
wadya think :please:
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:iconr-heinart:
r-heinart Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Blackhills 'gave' his skeleton to our museum, we never had a tyrannosaur, but in my opinion it was the best 1.2 million dollars the city ever spent. =D
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:iconmustardofdoom:
mustardofdoom Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2011  Student Traditional Artist
Looks great. Good wight to the skin and tail. Any reason for going with a pebble black eye?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Any reason not to? ;)

Honestly, it was sort of a spur of the moment "what looks good" sort of call.
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:iconmustardofdoom:
mustardofdoom Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2011  Student Traditional Artist
I just figure that eyes are a huge focal point in modern-day reptiles, so there is a similar opportunity to capture the viewer with an incredible piercing gaze. The piece easily supports itself, but that's probably how I would have approached it.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
That's true in many, thought not all, lizards. Living dinosaurs show a wide range of eye emphasis, with some having striking eyes (many birds of prey and psittacoforms) and others having much more subdued eye colors (e.g. corvids). Certainly a colorful eye would have been a valid and interesting choice, but given the size of the eye and the likely size of reproduction I was concerned that any color would not play well most of the time (the eye isn't actually pure black, it's more like a crow eye with a brownish-black coloring, but at the size you can see it on DA it just comes across as black).
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:iconmustardofdoom:
mustardofdoom Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2011  Student Traditional Artist
Ok. I can definitely see your point on the effect that would have developed in a reproduction this size.
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:iconthe-episiarch:
The-Episiarch Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2010
That's an interesting study, and it's awesome that you got to illustrate for it.

P.S. I prefer the colour scheme you have here rather than the green one which the authors preferred - but that's just from a purely aesthetic point of view.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2010  Professional Digital Artist
I agree aesthetically, although in point of fact a more forest-friendly color scheme may be a better bet (on the other hand, tigers do quite well in forests...).
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:iconthe-episiarch:
The-Episiarch Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2010
Oh I agree that the colour scheme suggested by the authors is probably more likely. The colour schemes of animals have come about for reasons other than our aesthetic preferences, of course.
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:iconindigomagpie:
indigomagpie Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2011
On the other hand, most tiger food can't tell red from green...
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:iconhanxopx:
HANxOPX Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2010  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Impressive work, sir! it's really hard to make accurate piece on such back angle. Stan looks great! I love this Rex it looks more as a hunter while Sue looks more like a giant scavenger. Anyway by following your Spinosaurus skeletal drawing I'm creating a new 3D model much better and more accurate than my previous T-Rex model, I'll inform you when it's done.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2010  Professional Digital Artist
Sounds cool, I'll keep an eye out.
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2010
I like the colors.
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:icontomozaurus:
Tomozaurus Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2010  Student General Artist
Excellent work.
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:iconiphicrates:
Iphicrates Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2010   General Artist
Also, if you're insecure about rendering your antediluvian menagerie from different points of view out of fear of being anatomically inaccurate (a common fear I suppose) you should simply buy some sculpey clay, wrap it around some aluminum foil and carve it to the correct three-dimensional measurements of your subject.
This sculpt doesn't have to be even remotely on par with a McVey or Krentz--nor even a full sculpture--only the basic, unadorned parts of the anatomy your uncertain about illustrating. With that in mind the "sculpture" should only take maybe an hour to create and then you can take photos of it from any angle you damn well please.
In life, for every single problem there are myriad solutions.
Cheers!
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2010  Professional Digital Artist
It's not so much insecurity as a difference in priorities. Generally speaking I'm more of a scientist than an artist, although in this case I got to don my artist had quite a bit more than usual.

That said, it's good advice, and actually I did use a sculpture (one that I actually provided some data for) during the sketch phase, and it was immensely helpful. But like everything else it's a question of how much time and effort can be put into a project (and time isn't something I've had much of this year).
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:iconiphicrates:
Iphicrates Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2010   General Artist
Well hopefully you can have time enough to create more wonderful works like this particular one.
If I could give a recommendation; I personally think it would be nice to see a Tyrannosaurus rendered with the color pattern of a jaguar or clouded leopard, especially since they did inhabit heavily forested locales.
At the least it's food for thought...
Keep up the great work.
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Submitted on
December 16, 2010
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