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Plunderer from Utah by ScottHartman Plunderer from Utah by ScottHartman
Edit 2017: At long last I can share the new Utahraptor skeletal drawing. This was first shared with my Patreon supporters in a public post here: www.patreon.com/posts/8625591

I also wrote a bit more about it on my blog: www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/a…

Go check out those two posts for more detailed information, but in short it's stocky, it's powerful, and it does NOT look like an overgrown Deinonychus or Velociraptor. All of you who have been waiting for years to see this should also go visit the Utahraptor Project (and consider supporting their GoFundMe site): utahraptors.utahpaleo.org/

Enjoy!
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:iconindominusrow:
IndominusRow Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2018
The thoracic region on this guy is HUGE! What would he need that for, if he was a fast hunter? Also, what about the down turned lower jaw? What the frig is that? His arms look SO big that they could catch anything, while his legs are kind of stunty. Also, his head is big compared to his body. He must have been a first rate killer, and he was? I think that groups of up to five of these things would DOMINATE the Late Cretaceous region of Arches. If you could explain some of this weirdness, that would be GREAT!
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:iconmajestic-colossus:
Majestic-Colossus Featured By Owner Sep 25, 2017
Why isn't there a scale bar? 
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:iconpaleo-reptiles:
Paleo-reptiles Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2017
Do raptors had Giant models in size of T.rex in early cretaceous?

which one of dinosaurs were predators like big cats in new world? Raptors? Tyrannosaurs? Gigantosaurs? Allosaurs?

cats can use their claws like raptors but we do not see claws in walk , we can see them in prey time ... Do Raptors had such skin cover in their claws of their feet in walking? please tell me your reasons
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:iconarchanubis:
Archanubis Featured By Owner Jun 27, 2017
To answer the first question (TKWTH answered the second and third), there do not appear to be any dromaeosaurs that exceeded the size reached by "giants" like Utahraptor, Achillobator and Dakotaraptor.  This size appears to be the "upper limit" for this group of dinos, probably because they had to contend with other predators that were already in the "T. rex" size class at the time (ex., Deinonychus had Acrocanthosaurus, and the aforementioned Dakotaraptor had to contend with Tyrannosaurus itself!)
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:icontkwth:
TKWTH Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Based on a YouTube video I watched called Why Are Raptors So Popular, it seems like the best Mesozoic analogue for big cats would indeed by raptors!

Also, cats have a very unique method of retracting their claws which raptors almost certainly didn't have. Based on footprints in China (I believe) we know that raptors kept their claws (which had a sharp keratin sheath that elongated them a bit) sharp simply by keeping them raised off of the ground.
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:iconmad-knight:
MAD-KNIGHT Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2017
Do you plan on doing a skeletal of Dakotaraptor in the near future? Or is the current holotype specimen too dubious at the moment?
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:icontigris115:
tigris115 Featured By Owner May 25, 2018
I'd say don't count on it

Dakota's a fragmentary animal and there's debate as to whether or not the associated remains even belonged to it.
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:icontkwth:
TKWTH Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'm not Scott, but Dakotaraptor was kinda shittily described and i pretty damn fragmentary. I can't see him doing a skeletal any time soon.
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:iconlordtyrant501:
LordTyrant501 Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2017
Yeah, we would have to wait for more remains or another specimen to be found.
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:icontkwth:
TKWTH Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Hope that's soon.
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:iconasmallmicroraptor:
Asmallmicroraptor Featured By Owner May 29, 2017
This is really beautiful, i love effort you put in both works and descriptions. I would ask to you: may i use this as reference for my future Utahraptor drawing? I will credit and link you. If you don't want it's ok.
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:iconcsaharicus:
Csaharicus Featured By Owner May 20, 2017
nice.
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:iconcommando252:
Commando252 Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2017
Whoa, Utahraptor is thicc. This is really what they gathered in the Utahraptor graveyard? Is there an idea about how these animals hunted? No other dromaeosaur is like this.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
This is based upon specimens from BYU, the type specimen, and some of the initial stuff from the graveyard site, but most of that remains to be prepped out (support them!). I don't know if the hunting style was so different from other dromaeosaurs, I think we might be seeing the consequences of trying to scale up maintain raptor prey restraint to larger size (and larger prey). 
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:iconnasavanna:
NASavanna Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It seems to me like a Dromaeosaur trying to be a Tyrannosaurid based on these proportions.
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:iconanarhia-2013:
Anarhia-2013 Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2017  Professional Traditional Artist
It`s amazing work. Can I used it for illustration and conspectus? of corse with Your link
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
That's fine. :)
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:iconanarhia-2013:
Anarhia-2013 Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2017  Professional Traditional Artist
WOW! Thank U for this great work!
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:iconpaleo-reptiles:
Paleo-reptiles Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2017
Dear Scott

I cannot find your answer to my question there .... Do you delete them?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
I haven't deleted anything. Which question?
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:iconjustarandomgourgeist:
JustaRandomGourgeist Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Those proportions
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:icondinopithecus:
Dinopithecus Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2017
I forgot to ask Mr. Hartman. How massive was this thing? Is it still ~500 kilograms?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
I think 500 kg should still be the default assumption until someone does a more rigorous mass estimate to test it.
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:iconpachyornis:
Pachyornis Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2017  Hobbyist
This bauplan truly shouts meso- to macropredator to me (without the need of social hunting). 
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:iconnashd1:
NashD1 Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Very exciting look and I'm sure you have been wanting to share it with people for some time. Can you please inform me if it has apically hooked serrations like many other dromies?

BTW you can blame me for several of the "scavenger" comments. I've always wrote about dromies as arch hunter/scavengers and splendid >facultative< scavengers which many others seem to drop off the facultative part unfortunately. I do suspect there is some connection between their elastic caudal rods and recouping of elastic energy that made them especially thrifty moderate speed travelers. Certainly not cheetah like speedsters but more like wolverines (short limbs but bouncy, springy gait) and hyenas ( some type of efficient gait) which allowed them to travel efficiently and over long distances for carcasses . Throw in a good sense of smell and you can imagine that a 20-30 ton sauropod could feed quite a few polar bear sized Utahraptors for some time - perhaps even get them through the roughest part of the dry season.

Best 

Duane
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Hi Duane - I can't give up any anatomical specifics that aren't already published, sorry. I don't in any way agree with the tail idea (neither that the extended prezygapophyses were particularly elastic, nor that they would work as an energy store), but it makes sense that it is where the scavenging mentions came from. Certainly just about any carnivore (and most omnivores and herbivores) will eat dead meat if the cost/benefit ratio skews sufficiently in their favor, and I'm sure dromaeosaurs were no different. Also, FWIW dromaeosaurs don't have any notable olfactory adaptations, though a strong sense of smell isn't preferentially associated with reliance of scavenging, so that's probably a moot point. Certainly a dead adult sauropod would have fed a pack of Utahraptors for quite a while.
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:icondinomariozilla:
DinoMarioZilla Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
This guy truly was the juggernaut of dromaeosaurs!
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:iconphiloceratops:
Philoceratops Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
So you said in the article accompanying this skeletal, you said that you had more skeletals on your hard drive. Are you going to submit them anytime soon? If so, I am so excited!
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
In my blog post I was referring to always having half a dozen or so skeletals that can't be made public until they are scientifically published, meaning I have no set date (sometimes I have to wait until a project is made public before I share) and no control over the timeline (sometimes things just have to wait until I have time to post them, write them up, etc.). Some of the ones in that last category you'll get to see as soon as time allows. But there seems to be some cosmic law where I always have between 5-7 skeletals that are waiting on scientific publication.

P.S. The Utahraptor skeletal is definitely NOT the longest time I've had to wait to share a skeletal, it just was publicized so people who cared knew they were waiting for it.
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:iconthedinorocker:
thedinorocker Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2017
Utahraptor is amazing, but the one I am truly waiting is Argentinosaurus; both paper and skeletal :)
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
In the works.
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:iconthedinorocker:
thedinorocker Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2017
Hope the paper will be open access :)
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:icongrisador:
grisador Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2017
Utahraptor; the big fat giant vulture ? (Perfect :D)
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Vultures are about as close to obligate scavengers as there are, so that's probably not a good model (unless you meant it as a visual).
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:icongrisador:
grisador Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2017
I mean Visualy ^^; I know that the Vultures are not good examples for Hunter animals.
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:iconpatchi1995:
Patchi1995 Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2017  Hobbyist Artist
I did not know about this, Utahraptor got a big head, and little arms, and still less Deinonychus like. Awesome!
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 3, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Yeah, I've had to sit on it for quite a while, but since the data I used has trickled out in papers and presentations the fine folks at the Utahraptor Project let me post it.
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:icontranspaleoartist:
transpaleoartist Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
AT LONG LONG LAST!!!!!!!!!!
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 3, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Hope it was worth the wait!
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:icondeinonychusempire:
DeinonychusEmpire Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
FINALLY! I've been waiting so patiently.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Hopefully it lived up to the hype.
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:icondeinonychusempire:
DeinonychusEmpire Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
It's definitely not what I expected. The proportions seem bizarre for a dromaeosaurid. It definitely looks like it was going the way of large theropods.
Reply
:iconwhiskerfacerumpel:
WhiskerfaceRumpel Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Whoa.
Reply
:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Neo's reaction to seeing Utahraptor?
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:iconwhiskerfacerumpel:
WhiskerfaceRumpel Featured By Owner Apr 3, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Lol teehee
Reply
:iconwynterhawke07:
Wynterhawke07 Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2017  Hobbyist Writer
Makes me curious what ecological niche it would have filled out. 
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 3, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
The bitey-eaty one. ;)
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:iconwynterhawke07:
Wynterhawke07 Featured By Owner Apr 3, 2017  Hobbyist Writer
But of course. :P

I'm more curious about how its hunting strategies and general lifestyle would have differed from other dromeosaurids, particularly other large ones... not that we particularly know a lot about how they lived. 
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:icongamerey:
Gamerey Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2017
Were there any larger theropods that lived alongside it?  It looks like it evolved to fill the place of an apex theropod like Acrocanthosaurus.  Like a Dromaeosaurus on steroids. 
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:icongreekrandomness:
GreekRandomness Featured By Owner Apr 3, 2017  Hobbyist Artist
I believe it was the largest theropod in the member. That being said there was of course Acrocanthosaurus elsewhere in the formation.
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