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Melanorosaurus by ScottHartman Melanorosaurus by ScottHartman
A derived "prosauropod", Melanorosaurus was thinking very hard about becoming a sauropod... (note: not an actual mechanism behind phenotypic translation over evolutionary time!)
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:iconmegalotitan:
Megalotitan Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Is the 2014 version up on your website still mainly based on NMQR 3314?
Also, is there a particular paper that describes the postcrania of this specimen?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2018  Professional Digital Artist
Yes it is, and no, I was supplied with photos of specimens. That said, with recently raised issues about which specimens are Melanorosaurus some of the proportions will probably need updating at some point when more is published.
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:iconmegalotitan:
Megalotitan Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Ah, alright. Is there any measurement you have of any of the limb bones preserved?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2018  Professional Digital Artist
I have data that was sent to me, but it's not mine to share, sorry.
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:iconmegalotitan:
Megalotitan Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
ah, fair enough
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:iconatlantis536:
Atlantis536 Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Somehow, I think Melanorosaurus was yellow with blue stripes, had a moustache, and blue/purple ear flaps, similar to an frilled lizard's.
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:iconjd-man:
JD-man Featured By Owner May 3, 2013
This reminds me of some questions:
-Do prosauropods have 4 or 5 toes per foot? I wasn't sure if the remainder of the 5th toe would've been visible in life (& thus, counted as a separate toe) or if, like the remainder of the 3rd finger in tyrannosaurid hands, it would've been fused to the foot (& thus, not counted as a separate toe).
-Is it true that some sauropods have 4 claws per foot (as opposed to 3) &, if so, which ones?
-Was Lessemsaurus a prosauropod or a sauropod? I ask b/c I saw an illustration of 1 w/4 clawed toes per foot by Tempesta, but wasn't sure if it was accurate, partly b/c that depends on the answers to my previous questions.

Many thanks in advance.

P.S. When I said "prosauropod", I meant "non-sauropod sauropodomorph" (as opposed to "core prosauropod"). Just making sure we're talking about the same thing.
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:iconrobosawrus:
robosawrus Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2013
I am working on Kotasaurus right now in addition to Majungasaurus, what a frustration! Concerning the manus: how much was included in the remains and how prosauropod-like is the carpus? It is difficult to make out at this scale. Your beautiful reconstruction, compares/contrasts nicely with Paul's Riojasaurus!
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Apr 3, 2007
Is that the actual referred skull? I've never seen a reconstruction of this dinosaur, and never found any good information on it, and never imagined the specimen was this complete.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2007  Professional Digital Artist
That's the actual skull, as recently described by Adam Yates. The specimen is in South Africa, and is still in articulation. The skull is crushed slightly top to bottom, but that's all that's wrong with it.
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2007
Wow! So this mysterious dinosaur is no longer much of a mystery, now is it? at least not to me. The only mystery left now is where it belongs in the sauropodomorph tree...Prosauropoda was broken up, right? And now they're called "basal sauropodomorphs", being the melanorosauridae, riojasauridae, plateosauridae...and so on...Those darn sauropodomorphs!
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2007  Professional Digital Artist
You're right, it's one of the better known "prosauropods" now. You are also correct that "prosauropod" is not a natural group. Melanorosaurids are very close to the base of Sauropoda.
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:iconaspidel:
aspidel Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2007  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I obviously will fav it due to the quality of research and ref for paleoart.
It was quite time to have good reconstructions of some less known prosauropods.
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:iconmegalania1859:
Megalania1859 Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2007
yeah, one early scientist thought that genetic mutations could be willed.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2007  Professional Digital Artist
I assume you are referring to Lamarck? His ideas were actually much more sophisticated than this; the idea that he thought organisms bettered themselves and passed it on to their offspring was an oversimplification created by English writers who opposed him (notably Charles Lyell). Alas some of Lamarck's work still is not available in English (and my French sucks).
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:iconmegalania1859:
Megalania1859 Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2007
french always sucks. i guess your right. I don't know much about the history of evolution.
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2007  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
oooohhhhh, defensive. But that's the result of generations of people talking about animals deciding to evolve.
I feel you.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2007  Professional Digital Artist
Every time I teach evolution at the high school level I find students who think that evolution works by animals "trying to better themselves". So yeah, I error on the side of caution.
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2007  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Been there, done that. -sighs deeply-
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March 13, 2007
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