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Mamenchisaurus youngi skeletal by ScottHartman Mamenchisaurus youngi skeletal by ScottHartman
A true giraffe-morph sauropod from the Late Jurassic of China. I will be most interested to see what the vertebral column of its sister species, M. hochuanesis, looks like now...

Edit: A massive overhaul of this skeletal (although the bones themselves were fine, it was the last to see the changes from my work on sauropod anatomy). It's still a fugly-looking sauropod, but now at least it looks less...defective.
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:iconjimbowyrick1:
Jimbowyrick1 Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Structural engineers have examined these fossils, and have concluded that these animals could not have existed in the gravity of our modern world, and that the Earth's gravity, in the past, was less than it is today.
Please go on YouTube, and look at at videos from the "Electric Universe" and "Thunderbolts Project". There's one in particular dealing with "Dinosaurs pose a problem" for modern gravitational theory.
Paint til you faint!
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2018  Professional Digital Artist
I'm sorry, but that's 100% ridiculous. First off, biomechanical studies have found no issues to sauropods existing in 1g - there are dozens of papers on this. None of the so-called structural engineers have every published any professional papers on this (and probably couldn't, because they are making terrible assumptions). Second, there is simply no way that gravity could have been different in the past - gravity is an intrinsic property of mass, and the Earth has not been appreciably growing in mass for the last several billion years.
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:iconjimbowyrick1:
Jimbowyrick1 Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Okay!
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:icontigris115:
tigris115 Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2017
What's a good skeletal for M. sinocanadorum
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:iconnestiebot:
NestieBot Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2017
Love him. :D
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:iconblazze92:
bLAZZE92 Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2014
I think you might have the neck and dorsal series a little too big/long, measuring them with a GIMP script they turn out ~5%-10% bigger than the measurements reported by Wu et al. (2013) and Christian et al. (2013).
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Likely my scale bar is off instead, but I'll take a look as soon as I can.
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:iconpedrosalas:
PedroSalas Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
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:iconpedrosalas:
PedroSalas Featured By Owner Feb 18, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
Up to where I knew, Mamenchisaurus' necks were as long as the length of their bodies plus their tails together and up to 18 m. long. This skeletal defies my assumptions.

And another issue: How low could this animal get its head? And, in this position, what shape did the neck acquire, an arch o a straight line?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Like most animals I expect it could drink (i.e. get its head down to the ground level), and I would expect it to achieve a graceful arch to the neck in doing so...although giraffes don't look terribly graceful, so maybe it would have looked silly (in fairness to Mamenchisaurus, it has a LOT more neck vertebrae to bend with than a giraffe does).
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:iconpedrosalas:
PedroSalas Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
I see... guess they weren't able to get the water they needed only from their food. Or perhaps they had to lie down to do things like drinking or mating. Exposing thus themselves to their foes.
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:iconlegendguard:
legendguard Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
how on EARTH did this thing move?!
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
With its feet mostly.
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:iconornitholestes1:
Ornitholestes1 Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Go home evolution. You're drunk.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Lol! Funny meme is funny ;)
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:iconpeteridish:
PeteriDish Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
your skeletals are a real eye-candy! truly beautiful!
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks, although this particular skeletal strikes me as more weird-looking than beautiful.
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:iconpeteridish:
PeteriDish Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
it sure was a weird animal, but what sauropod wasn't weird by today's animal standards? :D
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:iconmrgorsh:
MrGorsh Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
While it, indeed, looks weird as an animal, this is probably what most mainstream media associate with the word "Sauropod". Tiny head on a long neck, long tail and small, chunky body :P Although the base of the tail gives an impression as if the animal was about to drop a load at any given moment.
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:icondinobirdman:
DinoBirdMan Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014  Student Artist
This is nice for true "Giraffe of the Jurassic."
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:iconteh-dino:
teh-dino Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
This is yet another moment when the only correct response is, "wtf, nature?" Looks more like some handheld vacuum cleaner than a workable animal!
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:iconsomnium-23:
Somnium-23 Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2014
You want a good example of "wtf nature", just look at yourself ;)
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:iconteh-dino:
teh-dino Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Ain't that the truth :p.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Yeah, it doesn't look real. And yet it's based on a very nicely preserved specimen.
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014
Looks like a snake that swallowed a tiny elephant.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Ha, it does!
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2014
You're going to have to relay that to one of the paleontologists.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
You already have :D
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:iconaction-figure-opera:
action-figure-opera Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2014
I mean spread it around :P
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:icontitanorex:
TitanoRex Featured By Owner May 19, 2012
Never seen a Mamenchisaurus skull like that, seems almost camarasaur-like, have they ever found mamenchisaurus skull i know they have mounted skeletons of Mamenchisaurus but we all know you cant always trust those mounts
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner May 19, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
They have found a couple, and the others don't look like this. I'm not altogether sure that "M." youngi should actually be Mamenchisaurus.
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:iconthedinorocker:
thedinorocker Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2014
Mamenchisaurus genus: sauropods with different skull morphology different number of vertebrae and different caudal morphology :)
Love them
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:icontitanorex:
TitanoRex Featured By Owner May 19, 2012
Just when you thought it was safe to draw realistic depictions of mamenchisaurus
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:icondeathpenguin82:
deathpenguin82 Featured By Owner May 5, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Mind if I use this today as a reference for discussing illustrations? Copyright and site all ready to go on there for it.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner May 6, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Go for it.
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:iconsameerprehistorica:
SameerPrehistorica Featured By Owner May 22, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Nicely done.... Now thats a huge ladder :)
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:iconbabbletrish:
babbletrish Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
Beautiful! I wish I'd had this as reference last summer: [link]
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:iconctenospondylusvera:
CtenospondylusVera Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2011   Traditional Artist
Wow, i love Mamenchisaurus, it's great!
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:iconsteveoc86:
Steveoc86 Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2011
Interesting updates. The one of the biggest difference seems to be the orientation of the shoulder blade. One thing I have noticed is that you (and others) put the shoulder blades of Diplodocids further onto the ribs than you do in other sauropod groups. In Diplodocids you show the coracoid lining up approximatly with the ribs. What is the reason for this? Is it to do with the width of the ribcage?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Sort of, yes. Diplodocids are more slab-sided than other sauropods, and as a result the pectoral girdle sits a bit tighter on the rib cage. There are some other markers on the scapulae that often help line up where they sit on the rib cage, but that's a WFTP sort of thing I'm afraid.

I will say that I had absolutely no idea what I was doing when it came to orienting pectoral girdles before I got to mount a bunch of dinosaurs. Sometimes I got it right anyways, but in retrospect that was luck rather than skill.

One final aside...I'm a bit more wishy-washy on the orientation (but not general position) of diplodocid pectoral girdles than I am with other sauropods. Part of it is the distribution of articulate specimens amongst taxa, and part of it is seemingly conflicting soft-tissue signals. In the case of mamenchisaurs however, there are actually adaptations in the shoulder joint to allow the arm to retain its normal range of motion even though the shoulder blade is more upright.
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:iconsteveoc86:
Steveoc86 Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2011
Ok, thanks for the info!

I wish I had seen this a few weeks ago. I just resently updated my Mamenchisaurus restoration. You recently hinted that you were working sauropod neck muscles.. What's your thoughts on how heavily muscled sauropod necks should be?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
Not massively muscled, but nuchal ligaments on top are not uncommon (probably the rule rather than the exception). Since that top part of the neck is fairly thin side to side, the base of the neck is roughly a square with a triangle on top in cross-section. It appears that Mamenchisaurus actually had rather weekly developed nuchal ligaments compared to most sauropods with upright(ish) necks.
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:iconthewhiningrhino:
Thewhiningrhino Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2011
A crazy long neck if there ever was one. You could slide down that thing!
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:icondsil:
DSil Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2011  Student General Artist
Jeez, look at those vertebrae! MASSIVE!
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:iconweatherfac:
Weatherfac Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
I wish I knew how to draw vertebral columns like that. Yours are so smooth and continuous and pretty.
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2011  Professional Digital Artist
I recommend doing it several dozen times. At least that's how I learned to do it.
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:iconbardicspoon:
BardicSpoon Featured By Owner Aug 7, 2010
Truely bizzare...
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:iconlkromero:
LKRomero Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2010
Hello Mr. Hartman,

Do you happen to have a top view of the mamenchisaurus skeleton?
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:iconscotthartman:
ScottHartman Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2010  Professional Digital Artist
Alas, I do not. And at this point it will likely not be until late Fall before I could make one. Sorry!
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:iconbran-artworks:
Bran-Artworks Featured By Owner May 5, 2009  Student General Artist
Hello mr Shartman¡¡ i would like to know if could get permission to make a illustration based on this skeletal reference (future illustration).
Bran
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Submitted on
May 28, 2007
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