ScottHartman's avatar

Clash of the Titans

By ScottHartman
110 Favourites
54 Comments
10K Views
So trying to figure out who the biggest sauropods are is challenging. It would be hard enough to get reliable data to draw all the bones, but many of the candidates for "largest sauropod" are frustratingly incomplete.

Case in point: Puertasaurus.

Often cited as being the largest known sauropod because it appears to basically tie Argentinosaurus in length and height but has wider back vertebrae (so presumably a more rotund torso), the chart above shows how tenuous our knowledge or Puertasaurus is.

Alamosaurus, on the other hand, is known from quite a few specimens. None of them are complete, so there is some debate over the proportions, but I feel reasonably good in the composite I've come up with. The very large specimen on display in Dallas, and a fragmentary specimen described by Fowler & Sullivan (2010) both point to a large animal (shown in gray) that is in the giant titanosaur size range, but falls short of Argentinosaurus/Puertasaurus size.

Enter a fragmentary tibia from Mexico described by Guzman-Gutierrez & Palomino-Sanchez (2006). It was tentatively referred to Alamosaurus, but it's titanic, suggesting that a North American titanosaur approached or even equalled Puertasaurus in size.

All of this is fascinating, but sadly the options are somewhat limited when comparing four vertebrae to a broken tibia.

P.S. Eventually Argentinosaurus will be added to this image. I'll be sure to send out an edit notice when it does. Props must go to ~Stuchlik for urging me to reconsider the Guzman-Gutierrez & Palomino-Sanchez specimen.
IMAGE DETAILS
Image size
4604x1899px 1.13 MB
Published:
© 2013 - 2020 ScottHartman
Comments54
anonymous's avatar
Join the community to add your comment. Already a deviant? Log In
PigsFly1010's avatar
PigsFly1010New Deviant

Majestic

Majestic-Colossus's avatar
Is Argentinosaurus going to join them anytime soon?
Franoys's avatar
FranoysStudent Digital Artist
So is Alamosaurus the biggest sauropod known (leving aside too fragmentary/dubious/poorly described/classified specimens and specimens based of footprints)? An interesting possibility...
ScottHartman's avatar
ScottHartmanProfessional Digital Artist
It's close, but Argentinosaurus does appear to be a bit bigger (assuming the mexican "Alamosaurus" tibia otherwise has the proportions of smaller Alamosaurus specimens).
Yutyrannus's avatar
YutyrannusHobbyist Writer
Can't wait to see Argentinosaurus! Also, of the sauropod skeletals you've done so far, which would be the best reference for Paralititan?
ScottHartman's avatar
ScottHartmanProfessional Digital Artist
I also can't wait to see Argentinosaurus. Unfortunately the project I was on to do one fell through, so I'm not sure when I'll get to it. As for Paralititan, the scrappy remains have lead to it being excluded from many phylogenetic studies, so to be honest I'm not sure there's a clear consensus on where to stick it at the moment.
Stuchlik's avatar
Do you have some computer program to GDI? 
Best
ScottHartman's avatar
ScottHartmanProfessional Digital Artist
I take measurements with the Photoshop measure tool and I keep the data in Excel (which I've rigged to calculate the GDI on the fly as I add the data).
Stuchlik's avatar
Argentinosaurus will be superb! and GDI this giants - Alamosaurus, Puertasaurus and Argentinosaurus will be really cool:)
Yutyrannus's avatar
YutyrannusHobbyist Writer
That's okay. So far I've drawn it from your Malawisaurus. Its too bad that project got cancelled, hopefully you can still find time to finish some of the skeletals :).
Paleo-reptiles's avatar

Mamenchisaurus Species Scale Steveoc86

commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fil…

 

Now, if we want to rebuild old books, we should account a length of 20 or 30 matters as a juvenile sauropod...adults are really giant, even for dangerous carnivores.

in old books, artists drew a T.rex beside Apatosaurus or a T.rex prey Diplodocus....oh my God,such imagine  account as  a wrong  imagination  for more than 20 years but Now, we know sauropods larger than Apatosaurus exist in life of T.rex. However, T.rex prey just Triceratops and hadrosaurs because teeth and jaw of T.rex just was good for broke bones and not cut giant flesh :)

coherentsheaf's avatar
coherentsheafHobbyist
Hm the feet of the Alamosaurus seem rather large. In the paper: "Speeds and stance of titanosaur sauropods: analysis of Titanopodus tracks from the Late Cretaceous of Mendoza, Argentina "
The hip height was 4.586 times the foot length which is different from here. Is this paper accurate?

Anyway I love the comparison. Gives a great feel for the size!
ScottHartman's avatar
ScottHartmanProfessional Digital Artist
It's possible that the paper is accurate for the specimen they calculate it on, though they have the metatarsals too elevated in my opinion (and the opinion of most of the people who are doing biomechanics) which of course impacts the fore-to-aft length of the restored pes. But either way we shouldn't expect a single strict foot-length to hip height ratio.
coherentsheaf's avatar
coherentsheafHobbyist
Thank you vey much for the response.
supergoji18's avatar
supergoji18Student Traditional Artist
isnt there supposedly a sauropod that is about 150 feet long?
ScottHartman's avatar
ScottHartmanProfessional Digital Artist
At various times there have supposedly been several sauropods speculated to have reached this size. But only Amphicoelias fragillimus appears like it would actually have been that big, and the only bone known from it has been lost for over a century (i.e. there's no way to test it), so I ignored it.
SpinoInWonderland's avatar
What about "Brachiosaurus" nougaredi? Scaling from Brachiosaurus, and taking neck allometry [link] into account, may get it above the ~45.7-meter mark.

It's known from a huge incomplete sacrum, missing one sacral vertebra, the preserved part is about about ~1.3 meters long in total.
ScottHartman's avatar
ScottHartmanProfessional Digital Artist
It's not clear that Brachiosaurus should actually be used - the specimen is more likely from further up the macronarian family tree. It's clearly a huge animal, but I wouldn't speculate as to the length without being able to better constrain its relationships (or find more of it!).
Stuchlik's avatar
Its true. I think that biggest titanosaurs was "only" close to 30 m and probably 60 metric tons (Mybe only legendary Bruhathkayosaurus was bigger). Some sauropods like Supersaurus , Diplodocus and Mamenchisaurus was probably longer but not heavier.

I'm form Poland and my english is bad, but in this forum I try estimate Amphocielias fragillimus size.

[link]

For example Limayasaurus was ~17 m long (85% complete skeleton) abut dorsal have close to 120 cm long!.
Majestic-Colossus's avatar
I think that the biggest of the big would be around 60-70 tons and 26-30m too... I no longer trust reconstructions much bigger than that, at least for the "usual" animals, not the dubious, almost mythical ones.
Shaochilong66's avatar
The estimates for Argentinosaurus,Puertasaurus,Alamosaurus,and possibly A.giganteus exceed 60 tonnes,not to mention the Ichnotaxon.
Paleo-reptiles's avatar
I and my younger brother love that father and his daughter beside Dinosaurs in your illustration....such picture give us a good emotion....the father and daughter remember us, brother Scott Hartman and his little daughter....Care yourself :)
ScottHartman's avatar
ScottHartmanProfessional Digital Artist
Thanks Amin - that's indeed me and my daughter :)
Stuchlik's avatar
Ruyangosaurus and Huanghetitan ruyangensis too are big. Very big probably was "French Monster Titanosaur".

Mamenchisaurus sinocanadorum 35 m ???? huge !!!.
Hudiesaurus sinojapanorum was very big.
Not officialy name Morrocan sauropod ~femur 236 cm.
Brachiosaurus "nougaredi"
anonymous's avatar
Join the community to add your comment. Already a deviant? Log In