ScottHartman's avatar
Paleontology and Anatomy
3.3K Watchers427.4K Page Views234 Deviations
Not Zunityrannus!
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142
Araripesuchus tsangatsangana
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155
Batrachotomus - the 'typical' Triassic loricatan
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257
Opisthocoelicaudia
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Postosuchus big and small
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412
Dreadnoughtus - huge, but not the 'hugest'
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288
Poposaurus gracilis sauntering along
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212
Teleocrater
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212
Confuciusornis
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164
Ixalerpeton
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163
See all
Postosuchus big and small
66
412
Dreadnoughtus - huge, but not the 'hugest'
65
288
Poposaurus gracilis sauntering along
34
212
Teleocrater
46
212
Confuciusornis
54
164
Ixalerpeton
27
163
Finally, an aetosaur!
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208
Granddaddy of the armored dinosaurs
41
185
La Rioja's ponderous biped
43
137
Iguanodon
137
232
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Beipiaosaurus
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100
OC Utah Overlord sketch
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35
built like a Sherman tank
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136
Naked Anchiornis
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242
Raise the sails, mateys!
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329
The Grand Dimetrodon
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100
Bring on the thunder
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124
Life Size Scansoriopterygids
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323
Indominous crusher
24
86
Jul 2
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Deviant for 12 years
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Most theropods probably had lips
This is just a quick journal entry to let all of you know I'm overhauling of my non-bird theropod skeletals, and a large part of it is to put more obvious (and IMO more accurate) lips on them. I've written up a (lengthy) blog post outlining the evidence that supports theropods lips here: http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/the-lip-post1 I will do a second blog post in the next week or so on what correlates I'm using to guide the lip reconstructions. I also wanted to warn people that while I've updated around half of my theropod skeletals it will most likely be a few more weeks before I have those uploaded to DA, so in the meantime you are be
A quick update on my absence
Hello DAers! My long absence due to multiple projects (and teaching, and graduate school) is probably a month away from coming to an end. I apologies for those who sent me IMs and didn't hear back, sometimes for months. If there is a rush it's almost always better to contact me through my website contact form, as I'll see that right away. Also, I should have lots of fun skeletals to show off in the coming months (and years) thanks in part to the work I put in over the last 9 months. I look forward to chatting with you all again in a few weeks! -Scott
Anchiornis soft-tissue outline
My colleagues and I just published a new paper (available here) that many of you might be interested in. In it we used laser-fluorescence to investigate soft-tissue data that was not apparent under visible light. It brings quite a bit of detail to what we know about Anchiornis, and for you paleoart types it should help you flesh out your small theropod reconstructions. You can also read some of my own thoughts on it (mostly anatomy/paleoart related) on my blog here.
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Phillip2001's avatar
Phillip2001|Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Dear Mr. Hartman,

would it be okay for you if I use some of your reconstructions as references for animation models while I credit you in the video description and leave a link to your page when I showcase them in Youtube?
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Liopurodon4x's avatar
which models phill? I can help you out. Are they 3d my dude
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Phillip2001's avatar
Phillip2001Edited |Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks, man!! :D I wanted to do a Stegosaurus based on his one. Also, no, they aren't 3D.
I'm not gonna make them if he won't give me his permission.
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Liopurodon4x's avatar
I will make a skeletal sketch for you then
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thedinorocker's avatar
Hi Scott I updated my T.rex comparision with full credits on the image itself and in the description so if it Will spread on the Internet the Copyright Will still be there.
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DinosRAwesome's avatar
How do you make these awesome skeletals if I may ask?
Reply  ·  
ScottHartman's avatar
ScottHartman|Professional Digital Artist
That's potentially a really long answer, unless there's a specific aspect of the process you are interested in? The short version is I've studied comparative anatomy for years (I teach the subject now) including lots of dissections. I also have been able to visit many of the fossil specimens I've restored (and I led a team that mounted about 20 of them in Thermopolis, Wyoming...putting them together in 3D really helped my 2d skeletals).

Having been lucky enough to do those things, even when I'm working from photos and measurements I can generally visualize the bones three dimensionally. For a specific skeletal I generally start by (re)reading all the relevant scientific literature on that species, and often on close relatives (especially if I need to use them to fill in any missing parts).

In terms of the illustration tools I use, I use Photoshop with many dozens of layers, illustrate each bone (I actually wrote a blog post that dealt with some of those challanges recently: www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/t… ). Once they are articulated I illustrate the silhouette on the bottom layer based on the most current analyses of soft-tissue reconstructions (well, the most recent ones I think are correct - like everyone else I have opinions and some of my own ongoing research that influences what I think). Keeping everything on layers like that at very high resolutions means chewing through more RAM, but it also makes it easier to repose and/or update them when necessary.

I generally work on PCs desktops, because I can build my own to save money (especially when shoving 32-64 gb of ram into it). Last year I also started using a Surface Studio, which I've found helps shave a bit of time off the process of illustrating individual bones, which is nice, although I still work in my desktop for scaling, reposing, and often for the silhouette illustration. To facilitate that I've got everything synced through the cloud and I have a fast router and a nice mesh wifi system, so even with GB-sized files I rarely have to wait more than a few moments before I can switch between computers to work on the same file.

I sort of condensed a lot of steps there, but I wasn't sure if you wanted a general overview or were looking for something specific. I hope it helps!
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