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Green Man Ruins Walkthrough

By runique
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31 Comments
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I managed to remember to save work in progress images as I painted my recent Green Man Ruins artwork. So I decided to create a walkthrough in the hope it might give some insight into my painting process.

This image was painted using Corel Painter and a Wacom Intuos 3 tablet. The painting was spread over several weeks but there must be around 50 hours painting involved. Corel Painter is my software of choice for digital painting as I like the brush engine and the dab method of painting it allows. But it would be just as possible to paint an image like this in Photoshop.

I should point out that I am entirely self taught and so this is not a tutorial in how to paint digitally. I'm sure there are more efficient or academically correct ways to approach things than my methods. So I present this as a walkthrough and if it helps anyone with their own painting then that's great, because I learned a lot myself from viewing walkthroughs by other artists.

You can view the finished image here:


Prints of the finished image are available here: link
Image details
Image size
1000x8560px 1.23 MB
Published:
© 2011 - 2021 runique
Comments31
anonymous's avatar
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Mistikfantasy's avatar
That's crazy! Well done =)
runique's avatar
LaraMuk's avatar
Im learning painter for class as well as trying to improve on my lineless digital art and this is really helpful to see :) thanks :) I love the creepy factor in the fog too! XD. If I may ask, do you use full opacity on the beginning stages or do you lower it? my current trouble is getting the painting to completely hide the original pencil lines (I'm painting over a scanned sketch). I do multicolor underpaintings in acrylic paint and im trying to do similar with painter, so ive been using low opacity to build up layers of color and I just have a bit of trouble deleting the lines. If I leave them in, it looks sketchy, if I take them out, the picture looks like its missing chunks :O I'm doing a purely grayscale underpainting right now for practice and im painting on a middle value canvas, and I would really appreciate any advice you can give me to solve the lines :O
runique's avatar
Thanks for the kind words, glad my walkthrough is useful. When I am blocking in the early colours on a painting I usually use full opacity, or close to full. This means that the original sketch linework does usually get covered up quite quickly - you'll notice in the walkthrough that the original linework is almost gone by as early as stage 3. Also, I tend to use brushes which blend as they paint (some of the oil and acrylic brushes do this) or I use blender brushes, so this means the origial linework tends to get blended in quite early on. I don't just switch the sketch layer off because this causes the gaps you mentioned, I usually overpaint. The great thing about Painter is its paint engine means you don't need to build up layers of colour with multiple passes of low opacity strokes. This is more the Photoshop way of doing things. With Painter you can slap down some nice paint cover straight away. I like the oil and acrylic brushes for this, but there's lots of other brush types to choose from. In summary: use full opacity, use brushes which blend as you paint and/or use a blender brush (the "Just Add Water" blender works well with oils and acrylics, despite the name suggesting it should be for watercolours). Hope this helps.
LaraMuk's avatar
ah thanks so much for replying! i was using an oil brush that can blend so ill up the opacity a bunch :). im gonna try an overlay layers over a grayscale copy to get the rainbow underpainting effect and ill use the full opacity brushes on the first grayscale layer instead of using the colors first. :). i think that might work. otherwise if i use full opacity brush itll completely cover up my underpainting when i go for true color layer :O
runique's avatar
Yes, always paint on a layer, never paint directly on top of your linework or underpainting. Then you can collapse / merge the layers when you're happy. Something I forgot to mention is that if you are using any brush that blends it is essential that you make sure the option to "Pick Up Underlying Colour" is turned on. In Painter 12 this is a little icon at the top of the list of layers, next to the layer opacity slider. In earlier version I think it is a little tickbox in the same location.
LaraMuk's avatar
as yes! I forgot to check that box which i bet is part of the problem! I'm using painter 12 and was able to find it thanks :)
runique's avatar
Aha! Yes if you had 'pick up underlying colour' switched off then this would have made a BIG difference. Hopefully you'll be getting much better results now.
LaraMuk's avatar
im gonna work on it this weekend XD im excited to try it out :). thanks so much for the helpful tips! i really appreciate it :)
runique's avatar
You're welcome, look forward to seeing the results.
patiblackcat's avatar
do you know if you can make a custom brush from a picture in painter cuz i only know how to do that in photoshop
runique's avatar
Yes, but it works differently in Painter to Photoshop. There's two ways I know of. One is to make a Captured Brush, see here for an example. The other method is to create an Image Hose, see here for an example. Captured brushes will give you more painterly results, image hoses tend to be good for cloning and pattern generation. Hope this helps.
Larissa-Art's avatar
This is an awesome tutorial, thank you for creating it!
runique's avatar
You're welcome, glad it was useful.
Delet-ed's avatar
Wonderful tut.

I prefer tuts that just show how others paint instead of instructing. It's actually more helpful. When you read the instructions you kind of copy instead of learn. That being said, your tut is great.
runique's avatar
Thank you! Glad you found it useful.
serenawaters's avatar
i also thank you for posting this walk through. so fascinating! i once had photoshop years back and did a few things on it and enjoyed it emensely. i dont have any more and am completely unfamiliar with the all the computer art systems (except ms paint lol). i guess i'm an old fashion artist. partly by choice. and partly beacuse i'm poor lol. but seriously this is such a great painting! so glad you thought to share the process from beginning to completion. also enjoyed the seeing the up close details!
runique's avatar
Thank you! Glad you enjoyed the walkthrough. As a traditional artist you would probably enjoy working with Painter. It's also not as expensive as Photoshop, but it's still not that cheap either. You can get a 30 day trial of Painter but the main problem is you do need a graphics tablet to get the most out of it - mouse painting is like trying to run with your shoelaces tied together.
serenawaters's avatar
lol yeah using a mouse to draw isnt easy lol but i've done it. the erase and undo are rather helpfull tools. maybe some day...ya know when my ship comes in...i'll be able to get the better stuff like what you have and just go nuts with it.
runique's avatar
It might be possible to pick up an older Wacom tablet cheap on eBay if you're lucky. Even the early v1 Intuos tablets had good pressure sensitivity. All that's been added with the newer models is lots of extra buttons and features you don't really need. As for software, The GIMP is a free alternative to Photoshop that a lot of people swear by, have you tried it?
serenawaters's avatar
no i havent tried it. i havent really got to play with that kind of stuff yet. rather behind the times i guess. when i get some money up i'll check it out thanks!
anonymous's avatar
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