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Dulce Et Decorum Est

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"Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of tired, outstripped Five-Nines that dropped behind.

Gas! Gas! Quick, boys! -- An ecstasy of fumbling,
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time;
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling,
And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime . . .
Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.
In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est
Pro patria mori. "


(Wilfred Owen)

...

1914-1918
We Shall Remember

...

GIMP 2.2
Original image :: In Flanders Fields
Texture :: [link]
Image details
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338x445px 284.03 KB
© 2007 - 2021 ringosdiamond
Comments24
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el-la-jongleuse's avatar
Very dramatic, I love how the poppy looks like blood-pool. And the old photography stylization completed image, the sky is amazing.
Kusrio's avatar
The poppy symbolizes the death of a soldier in the first World War, right?

It's a beautiful image, which is very fitting for the horrifying poem by Wilfred Owen.
ringosdiamond's avatar
Yup, and I'm glad that I don't need to drive all the way up to West Flanders just to get a shot of a poppy -- though those are THE poppies you want to use when talking about WWI... yeah still not worth a two-hour drive. Though I am planning to revisit Ypres one of these days...

Thanks, glad you like this!
blk-panther's avatar
Congratulations on a beautiful image for Owen's poem..
xxFEExx's avatar
We're studying Wilfred Owen at school at the moment
I love this poem
especially the last bit
"My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori"
It makes me want to cry
I love it
Cosmic-girl88's avatar
Oh my god, this is simply beautiful. i am simply obsessed with WW1 literature and poetry, we did it for A level and I have never looked back! Do you have a favourite war poet? Mine is definately Wilfred Owen, but i like Sassoon, Charles Sorley, Isaac Rosenberg and Robert Graves.
Cosmic* xx
ringosdiamond's avatar
Owen, all the way. But Sassoon and Rosenberg are also magnificent.

Glad you like this! :cuddle:
Cosmic-girl88's avatar
Yay for Owen. I really want to draw him again. I did a little piece of just his profile about 2 years ago but would love to skecth him again.
Keep up the fabulous work!
Cosmic* xx
boldlyplunging's avatar
I totally missed this one. It's gorgeous and lovely tribute. It's also a great poem - I was listening to this piano piece whilst reading it and it thoroughly depressed me.
ringosdiamond's avatar
Thanks! I made it for LJ, but then I decided to share it with my dA buddies as well.

This poem is by far the best WWI poem ever written. It's raw and realistic, just the way war poetry should be. there is no glory in war, especially not the Great War.
PaniFilth's avatar
stupid emoticons - patriotism
ringosdiamond's avatar
Ha, I hate it when the emotions do that. *grrr*

I don't know if we've seen this poem in high school -- during English we would focus on some very famous war poems so chances are this one got selected one year. I know our teachers used to look at several poems each year -- but she'd also let us listen to a song about WWI, for instance "The Green Fields of France", which is absolutely gorgeous.
PaniFilth's avatar
I forgot to say that in general I don't like rhymes in poems, but this one is amazing :heart:
And that's sad - if we talk about WWI poetry at school (that's really rare), we talk only about Polish authors (I guess I've never seen any English author in none of my literature books). That's sad, because such good pieces just pass in front of our eyes (but in my school it's called ';patriotism' -_- )
PaniFilth's avatar
"The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est
Pro patria mori." <-- I love it :heart:
ringosdiamond's avatar
That's my favourite line, it smacks the truth right in your face -- and that's why I love it.
hidingbehindglass's avatar
i wish we studied stuff like that here in the States. i've never even heard of this poem until just a few seconds ago.
ringosdiamond's avatar
WHAT??? They didn't teach you about WWI poetry? It's poems like this that can help us understand the mistakes of the past, and in a way it brings us closer to the horror of the war than any historical report ever could.

*shocked*
hidingbehindglass's avatar
no, we were taught what happened, and even then it was a bit glossed over.
Ferrygirl's avatar
I had to write an essay about this poem for my English GCSE in 1999.
ringosdiamond's avatar
If we hadn't discussed it during part of English Literature at university, I'd have made an assignment about this poem as well.

It's my favourite war poem ever!
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