Ranarh's avatar

Genius Loci: The Northeastern Blades

19 6 416 (1 Today)
By Ranarh   |   
Published: November 17, 2015
© 2015 - 2020 Ranarh
"The Northeastern Blades apparently have a taste for the palace treasury. Since their first bearer Jauron, no less than seven times were they in the hands of burglars here."
— Vratima Stonewalker, palace guard

I always loved what exotic forms blades took throughout the cultures and threw some particularly beautiful ones together for these legendary daggers from my world Genius Loci. They are lightning-fast, very strong-willed, and prefer scoundrels as bearers. What could go wrong?

Check out Genius Loci in my blog Starmaker's Gaze and my website.
Image size
756x800px 101.82 KB
Comments6
anonymous's avatar
Join the community to add your comment. Already a deviant? Log In
hewhogroks's avatar
hewhogroksHobbyist Writer
Those are nice, but (sorry I have to say) profoundly impractical, at least for humanoid wielders. :doh:
Ranarh's avatar
RanarhProfessional General Artist
Perhaps they appear shorter than they are? The handles are large enough to grip.
hewhogroks's avatar
hewhogroksHobbyist Writer
Oh I gathered that, it's just that the shape of the blades isn't really good for either slashing or thrusting, and that's how humanoids typically use short blades.
Ranarh's avatar
RanarhProfessional General Artist
The main inspirations for these were the khopesh, kris, and more exotically shaped blades like kujang or kudi. They all deviate from the simple straight blade. I admit I'm not entirely sure how such weapons are fought with, but I guess when you have something sharp and hit someone with it, it hurts, which is what a weapon is meant to do, right?
hewhogroks's avatar
hewhogroksHobbyist Writer
I mean I'm just being pedantic, here -- from an artistic perspective they're very well illustrated.  I'm just annoyed by the genre's "more points = better" philosophy, when in actual bladecraft the opposite is generally true :XD:  
Ranarh's avatar
RanarhProfessional General Artist
In principle, I agree - for modern design. For fantasy design, it's perfectly fine to include representational or symbolic shapes or materials, because the purpose of the weapon was to not just slice, dice, and scalp, like a modern army knife or whathaveyou, but to instil fear, show the bearer's prowess as a warrior, his status etc.
These "beyond functional" tools are also a great deal of what makes space opera so appealing - the awe of futuristic/modern weapons (or whatever) technology with the splendor of ancient representation, when technology was made to serve mankind, and not mankind had to adapt to machines.
anonymous's avatar
Join the community to add your comment. Already a deviant? Log In