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The Last Oviraptorosaur by Qilong The Last Oviraptorosaur by Qilong
Known only from a few specimens from the Hell Creek Formation, and partially associated with the infamous Tyrannosaurus rex, the so-called "Triebold-raptor" is a large caenagnathid, and likely represents a new taxon. Suggestions may be that it merely represents a new species of Chirostenotes, although this is based on lumping a large amount of variation from the Campanian and Maastrichtian into a single type of caenagnathid. Very little of the foot is actually known, and what is shown here is based on a single large toe and part of a hallux (inner toe), and one metatarsal.

This was largely done after Scott Hartman's reconstruction, [link] , although I did refer to my own notes and several high quality photographs. Not my best work. Expect the skull portion to change more drastically when better data comes in.
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:icontomozaurus:
Tomozaurus Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2012  Student General Artist
I was surprised to find out what a large animal this guy actually is. Nice skeletal too, just waiting on more data on the thing.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2012
Yes, we should have more of that in the next year or so. And I appreciate your comments. As I said, I'm not too happy with this piece, but it was created for the purpose of increasing "completeness" among oviraptorosaurs in general.
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
SpongeBobFossilPants Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2011
Hey, is this the one we now call Epichirostenotes?
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2011
No. That's the top skeleton here: [link]
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:iconpilsator:
pilsator Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Very nice, and cool to see you skeletal-ing again!
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2011
Thanks!
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:iconiphicrates:
Iphicrates Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2011   General Artist
With you and Paul and Hartman all restoring it I'm glad so many masters of skeletal restoration are contributing to this fascinating creature.

Yes, there seems to be substantial variation between all your takes on the skull. Hopefully we'll get more material soon and a name, though that's probably asking a lot.

And hopefully this is the end of your artist's block--the world of the past, as well as that of the present, is far too fascinating to be justifiably uninspired.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2011
It's just not that high quality as Scott's and Paul's skeletals are. But this doesn't really push my block away ... I've been ... sketching a little lately, but not dinosaur stuff, and not really scanable stuff.
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2011
I also suspect this creature is in cahoots with Tyrannosaurus. Cahoots...what a word that is....cahooots. Anywho...
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2011
This creature needs a name. SRSLY.
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:iconalgoroth:
Algoroth Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2011  Professional General Artist
Fred. :laughing:
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2011
How about George?
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:iconalgoroth:
Algoroth Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2011  Professional General Artist
Nah! He looks like a Fred to me! How about George Frederick? :laughing:
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2011
"Word" has it that while this specimen is likely a new SPECIES, it won't be named with a new GENUS name, in the conventional sense. That means it's going to be called "Chirostenotes [something]." Maybe infernalis or something, in keeping with the Hell Creek.
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I read that it's much larger than normal Chirostenotes....maybe....Chirostenotes ultimus or Chirostenotes gigas would work....I wish there were giantish oviraptorids in the Lancian age though.....:(.....other than HIM up there, y;know....
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2011
The authors who are redescribing it are for now being conservative and calling it Chirostenotes pergracilis, with the intention of treating all northern North American caenagnathid taxa as Chirostenotes pergracilis with the exception of "Elmisaurus" elegans and Caenagnathus sternbergi (as Chirostenotes sternbergi or Chirostenotes elegans where "Elmisaurus" elegans is a synonym). Sorry if that seems technical.
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well, Chirostenotes seems a little wastebasket now, doesn't it? That's from what I seem to read here.....
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(1 Reply)
:iconalgoroth:
Algoroth Featured By Owner Jul 19, 2011  Professional General Artist
Infernalis? Damned evocative name! COOL!
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2011
Check out Bugenasaura infernalis, also from the Hell Creek. Or Stygimoloch spinifer. Some names write themselves.
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:iconalgoroth:
Algoroth Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2011  Professional General Artist
How about the old Dynamosaurus imperiosis? Used to be the name for a rex skeleton.
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