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Rat Crocs by Qilong Rat Crocs by Qilong
Way cool cross with bizarre, "mammal-like" dentition are relatively numerous. This one is Yacarerani boliviensis, whose name means "the first South American reptile" in the Guarani language of northern Argentina, Bolivia, and southern Brazil. It belonged to the notosuchians, who seem to have absorbed all the dental wierdness among crocodilians, such as bulbous teeth in the front of the jaws, or extra carinae, but in this animal's case the teeth in the front of the jaws are so close to one another they overlap in side view, and nearly touch one another on the left and right sides of the jaw, making a row of teeth at the front with a groove down the middle on the lower jaw. Cool stuff. It is heavily implied that they were herbivorous, and recent analysis of tooth wear and jaw anatomy suggests that this was the case for this animal. That's right: herbivorous crocs.
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:iconterizinosaurus:
Terizinosaurus Featured By Owner May 19, 2015
IT IS VERY FANTASTIC!!!
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:iconhattushilish:
Hattushilish Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2014
That's what I call convergent evolution, even the arrangement of the nasal openings is superficially so mammal-like. This is so insane :P
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:iconth3punk1n4t0r:
th3punk1n4t0r Featured By Owner May 3, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
quite strange- although I've long known that the crocodilians we have left today are merely a small slice of their previous variation.
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:iconshinreddear:
ShinRedDear Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
That's one hell of a bizarre dentition ! Ancient crocs are so much fun and I think we only scratched
the surface of their diversity. Really nice reconstruction. :D
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:iconevenape:
Evenape Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
The first notosuchid skeletal ever :D Awesomeness sir :D
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner May 3, 2013
I think there's a Simosuchus skeletal around. This one appears in the description of mostly complete remains: [link]

And there's this: [link]
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:iconevenape:
Evenape Featured By Owner May 4, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
Yeah, except that... Still, with the very diverse bauplan of these animals, we need more skeletals! xD
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:icondinobirdman:
DinoBirdMan Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013  Student Artist
Way the go for weirdest "Rat Croc!":D
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:iconkazuma27:
Kazuma27 Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Notosuchians were such cool crocs... Mammal-like teeth, fleshy nose and (probably) lips, just wow!
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner May 3, 2013
Yes, well, save for the "fleshy lips" thing. They're just labile, but passive structures: there were no muscles and they wouldn't lift to "snarl" or anything.
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2013  Professional General Artist
So, I assume, if they were not expressive, these "lips" would presumably just have been to aid in food retention?
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2013
Not really. These structures do not serve that function in extant reptiles. Instead, they tend to be more about sensation and protection of the oral tissues, to retard dehydration in animals that dwell in arid regions, but also yes, to "retain" some types of food. Note that one of the analogues to these tissues are the number, size and extent of the foramina, which indicate the size of branches of blood vessels (= thickness of tissues requiring nutrition) and nerves (= more sensation). Food retention doesn't seem to be much if any of a problem: You still see cattle and humans spilling food, despite their huge cheeks, and animals like geese and iguanas who lack them able to function fine.
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2013  Professional General Artist
true. Maybe "sensing food when biting" would be a better word.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2013
Sensation around the oral margin is the best explanation, but not only when biting: When drinking, when "nuzzling," when grooming (even if they had beaks!), etc.
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2013  Professional General Artist
cool :)
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:iconmarcoornithodira:
marcoornithodira Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
Whoa. Really weird animal!
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013  Professional General Artist
Bravo :clap:
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:iconorionide5:
Orionide5 Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013
Notosuchians are very cool. I see the foramina are few and large like in lizards and mammals, rather than small and many like in modern crocodiles. Is this possibly an indication that Yacarerani had "lizard lips?" Or is it more likely related to tooth growth?
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013
It is a likely conclusion; more data would be needed, but there does seem to be some evidence for a good amount of extraoral tissues around the jaw margins. So, "lizard lips" seems likely.
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2013  Professional General Artist
Thanks for that info.
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:iconorionide5:
Orionide5 Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013
Yes! More variety in a clade is always a good thing for artists.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2013
These guys are fairly modern-croc-sh in general form: sprawling, short-necked, not very cursorial, but they make up for that in being very different in the tooth department. So very different.
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:iconkrookodile0553:
Krookodile0553 Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013
We could have seen the Mekosuchines just a few thousand years ago and the majority of Gavialoida being extinct with the likelihood of being completely wiped out being very likely; Tis a shame Cruotarsan diversity has nosedived so greatly in the past 10 million years...
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013
Well, it used to be the Age of Crocs, especially in South America and other parts of Gondwana. Small theropods ruled Laurasia, while crocs ruled Gondwana.
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:iconkrookodile0553:
Krookodile0553 Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013
But so recently Crocodilians had many more body plans than the generic crocodile... To be able to observe an animal that is so unlike it's living relatives would be a dream come true... ;n;
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2013
Crocs are, sadly, one of those critters we're unlikely to De-Extinctify.
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:iconkrookodile0553:
Krookodile0553 Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2013
Exactly...
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:iconpeteridish:
PeteriDish Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
absolutely amazing!
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