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Raptors of the Dunes by Qilong Raptors of the Dunes by Qilong
Top: Linheraptor exquisitus, from the Wulansuhai Formation at Bayan Mandahu in Neimongol, China. Middle Right: Tsaagan mangas, from the Djadokhta Formation of Ukhaa Tolgod in Mongolia. Bottom: Velociraptor mongoliensis from the Djadokhta Formation (this specimen from Tugrik, but it is aso known from various other sites) in Mongolia.

The Late Cretaceous eolian deposits of southern Mongolia and northern China are dominated by a sequence that corresponds to the Djadokhta Formation (based in Mongolia). In northern China, deposits part of the Bayan Mandahu region and surroundings were considered part of the Djadokhta ... until recently, where they've been made part of their own regionally consistent formation that is nonetheless equivalent to the Djadokhta. The Ukhaa Tolgod site in southern Mongolia hosts some distinctive fauna, and contains several of the above taxa, but is also unique for its consistently beautiful preservation, while the other sites tend to produce less well-preserved fossils.
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:iconthedinorocker:
thedinorocker Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2015
I saw it on wikicommon,Great stuff!
still not sure if Linhearaptor is or is not the same Taxon of Tsaagan 
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:iconsketchy-raptor:
Sketchy-raptor Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2011  Student General Artist
Awesome, but I'm confused. In everything I've read, Velociraptor is listed as 2.5 metres long, but in this case it's Linheraptor, which I've always read was smaller, about the same size as Tsaagan... Where am getting all this from? And plus, what makes the three so different, If I hadn't seen the labels I would have thought they were all Velociraptor...
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2011
You might be confusing Velociraptor mongoliensis with the somewhat larger Deinonychus antirrhopus, the latter which was around 2.5 meters; Deinonychus antirrhopus as sometimes been called Velociraptor antirrhopus, especially by Greg Paul, but typically the two are kept apart. I only show the taxa from Mongolia here, with Deinonychus antirrhopus from North America.
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:iconsketchy-raptor:
Sketchy-raptor Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2011  Student General Artist
No, I'm not confusing them, I've always seen Deinonychus antirrhopus recorded as about 3.2 meters (According to the Princeton Field Guide), but in the Princeton field guide to dinosaurs it lists Velociraptor mongoliensis as 2.5 metres long, which seems near the size of the Linheraptor here. Is this something to do with Linheraptor being mistaken for Velociraptor before official description, similar in the case of Tsaagan?
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2011
No. Velociraptor mongoliensis here ([link]) is based on GIN 100/25, one of the larger specimens of the taxon. Going up from there, I do not think it could get even 25% larger. Meaning you have an animal less than 2m. Greg Paul conflates a lot of taxa in his Field Guide, a major failing of that work, and one that many people have criticized him on, so it's very possible he has confused several specimens. While it is possible he is conflating Linheraptor exquisitus ([link]), they should at least be different species under his scheme. Vel is not that large.
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:iconsketchy-raptor:
Sketchy-raptor Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2011  Student General Artist
Thank you, that clears a lot up, and I do agree, the merging of several taxon in the field guide does bring it down, and in many places it can get rather annoying.
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Velociraptor's so tin y! It's losing its reputation! :_
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2011
It's not supposed to have that reputation! That's supposed to belong to bigger "raptors," like Deinonychus antirrhopus or Utahraptor ostrommaysorum.
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Why them then?
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2011
MUCH larger: Deino was almost twice the size of Vel, Utah was at least 10x. Mass-wise, anyways. Vel was about as big as a turkey.
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:icongreekrandomness:
GreekRandomness Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2017  Hobbyist Artist
Deinonychus was around three meters, while Velociraptor was roughly two, and Utahraptor was about six on average, no?
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
You know what I find confusing? People are always calling Velociraptor turkey or even chicken sized, but these weigh respectively 5 and less than one kilogram, while V.mongoliensis weighed 15 kg...
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2016
That's a big turkey....
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Jul 7, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I was just eyeballing.
And, that just reinforces my point, that people saying Velociraptor was turkey sized, is not true.
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:iconalgoroth:
Algoroth Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2012  Professional General Artist
TOUGH turkey! I always thought of Velociraptor as being real cool looking; elegant, fast, smart, and DEADLY!
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:icontomozaurus:
Tomozaurus Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2010  Student General Artist
Your skeletals are so very helpful.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2011
Thank you. Scott Hartman does good ones, too. Probably better than mine.
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:icontomozaurus:
Tomozaurus Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2011  Student General Artist
Both yours and his are equally good.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2011
Eh, I have a lot more substantial flaws in mine than he does in his.
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:icondeinonychusempire:
DeinonychusEmpire Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
Wow, you Velociraptor diagram looks completely dissimilar from the diagram I use as reference for my Velociraptor reconstructions. I can see this one atcually has an accurate hip structure.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2010
We are actually fortunate to have now found a few well-preserved pelvises that allows up to correctly position the pubis and therefore the ischium. This is not to say there aren't also vertical-pubis'd dromaeosaurs, but this one anin't one of them.
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:icondeinonychusempire:
DeinonychusEmpire Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
It's depressing to think my drawing is inaccurate. xD
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:iconrickraptor105:
RickRaptor105 Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2010
They almost look like a growth series to me...
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2010
Yeah, they seem to be closely related, but there's a distinct separation involved here. Tsaagan was probably a bit larger than shown at adult proportions, and may rival Linheraptor in size. There are larger Velociraptor specimens, but not that many, and they seem to be distinct in larger stages.
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2010
Beautiful work as always :rose:
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:iconbrad-ysaurus:
Brad-ysaurus Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2010
Isn't Mahakala also a "dune raptor"? I'd like to see how tiny it looks beside these guys.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2010
Technically, yes. I did not include Mahakala because I was attempting, circuitously, to refer to a group of dromaeosaurids (sensu stricto) that would normally fall into "Velociraptor" proper merely a decade ago.
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