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Birdy Bones by Qilong Birdy Bones by Qilong
This is the golden-winged pocket parrot, Brotogeris chrysoptera. Ain't it cute?!
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:icondinoroy39:
DinoRoy39 Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
is that a bone in its tongue?!
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2014
Yes, yes it is. The hyoid bones in parrots are very thick, well-ossified things. The bones in the tongue of chameleons are much, much larger.
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:icondinoroy39:
DinoRoy39 Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
never knew that
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014
Parrots and amazing birds, and they do a lot of manipulating things with their jaws, and in some cases use their tongues to position objects or provide a brace against which fruits lay so the animal can crack them to get at the nutritious pulp or ovules (seeds). So a dense, stiffening structure is useful.
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:iconriverraven:
RiverRaven Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Birds skeletons are so weird, compared to mammals and even their dinosaur ancestors x) I always have troubles in the shoulder area (connection of the humerus and coracoid to the sternum and scapula, I'm sure you get what I mean :bucktooth:)
Thanks for sharing this!
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2012
No problem! Yes, the bird skeleton is not an easy one when you've dealt with mostly mammals at first. But soon, one gets used to it!
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:iconalgoroth:
Algoroth Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2011  Professional General Artist
Looks kinda bitchy to me! I've had to feed too many psittacine birds! Cool art!
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2005
Well, my art style in skeletons helps the design inference along a little, too ;)
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:iconoutlier:
Outlier Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2005
The 'god of evolution' was definitely in an art nouveau mood when designing parts of birds' skeletal architecture...
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:iconzegh8578:
ZEGH8578 Featured By Owner Jul 21, 2005
wuh.. i replied to something else, but it was directed to you anyway..

harpy: [link]
i based it on a mounted skeleton with wings streched out, and the pic was small, so all in all i wouldnt use this as a ref.

i'd rather use a photo of a living harpy eagle :D
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 22, 2005
Ah, yes, I remember seeing this. Was pretty cool. My current work is to use hi-res scans and pers. obs. of mounts and measurements to produce a skeleton. Lately, since birds vary typically within a species on proportions, I've notice exact proportions are not required, but close enough helps. Instead, exact morphology is required, since most bird species in a genus and in fact many genera, may be morphologically identical.
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:iconzegh8578:
ZEGH8578 Featured By Owner Jul 22, 2005
are there two specimens of ronaldoraptor?
i got one photo of a skull and a curled up neck in a rock, which is just the one you've drawn up there, right?
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 22, 2005
There are no specimens of Ronaldoraptor. It's a fake name for a fake dinosaur invented by Luis Rey and Henry Gee for a book. In my snouts of oviraptorosaurs I included the sketch of a snout of a skull that is not even in an institution and I debated that myself before I put it up. Labelling it "Ronaldoraptor" was, I think, a bad move, but used as a nickname rather than a taxon label and I am going to be removing that name for the sake of priority. Instead, I will use my original name for it, "Mitratus" or "Mitred one" since it looks like a Papal mitre on his head.

The mitred oviraptorids may or may not form a single taxon, I don't know. The second skull is only a small memory right now and a photo of it would help me see if it';s similar enough to the first. Like Chris Bennett and the "sail-headed" Nyctosaurus, even suggesting a new species when one doesn't have continual access to the material is, in my opinion, wrong. I am, in fact, more radical than Bennett and would argue you shouldn't even refer it to a genus already established, even if you DID study it for weeks on end. No one can test the conclusions without equal access, otherwise all they are doing is trying to refute someone based on the selfsame data given. New data brings new ideas.
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:iconzegh8578:
ZEGH8578 Featured By Owner Jul 23, 2005
hah just as well, "ronaldoraptor" was a name im not sure i could live with..
and yea, the skull photo i got is apparently from a private collection, which allso astounded me when i first found it, cus i felt rather pessimistic about the work-to-be-done on a private specimen :-/
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:iconsainte-vincient:
Sainte-Vincient Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2005  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Oh... really dumb question just to prove that I am not an anatomist... That's the Hyoid sticking up through the tongue, correct? If so, I guess I didn't realize that parrots used the hyoid like that. An interesting matter.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2005
well, the hyoid in all animals that have one is used for supporting lingual muscles. Parrots have very prominent tongues and a large hooked basihyoid bone (the one sticking up there). But you are correct, it is part of the hyoid complex.
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:iconsainte-vincient:
Sainte-Vincient Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2005  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well, I guess I knew that the hyoid was used for the lingual muscles... it is in humans. I guess what I hadn't realised is that hyoids came quiet so large and hooked. So, thanks for the info. It shall always be used for justice... *aheh* out of movie experience :shrug: . Thank you, Jaime.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 19, 2005
No problem, Daniel. You will find that hyoid bones, especially the rod-like ceratohyals and the block-shaped or wedge-shaped basihyal, can be good indicators of tongue size and function. Most dinosaurs and lizards don't have a well ossified basihyal, if at all, and only the ceratobranchial seems to ossify regularly, becaus it also supports strong throat muscles and is related to opening of the jaw. The larger the basihyal, it seems, the more muscular the tongue. Human basihyals are fused to the ceratohyals and ceratobranchials into a semi-ring that provides robust and rigid support for the throat and tongue (Gene Simmons must have a very large hyoid ring....).
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:iconsainte-vincient:
Sainte-Vincient Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2005  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Mmmmm, yes, I'd never considered the possiblity of incomplete ossification in the basihyoid. I was actually wondering why the hyoid complex never seems to be complete, say for instance in hadrosaurs. Usually there's just the two ceratohyals, though I'd have to go through my photos again just to be sure.
Hmmmm, you've suggested a line of research for me to do for my own sanity's sake.
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:iconsainte-vincient:
Sainte-Vincient Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2005  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes, cute... and very useful.
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:iconzegh8578:
ZEGH8578 Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2005
qilong, did you ever see my harpy-eagle skeletal? i did some others too, in the same run, but i never scanned them.
maybe you could do like me and indicate the feathers in a gray silouhette?

bird skeletons rock, and you gotta love parrots!

its good to see that the head-to-body ratio on this one isnt as extreme as in some parrots
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2005
No, never seen your skeleton that I can remember offhand....

I did a grey silhouette for the wings and tail of a fossil bird once, and I realized a few difficulties. For the same size detail, the size of the image becomes engrossingly large. Plus, if I did wings and tail, why stop there? Why not include the whole feather silhouette? I thought about it for the parrot, though, since it would show the way the skinny neck looks "fat" and short surrounded by feathers. I figured it would be too busy. Basically all I show is margins made by most muscle and tendons.
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:iconzegh8578:
ZEGH8578 Featured By Owner Jul 21, 2005
[link]
[link]

these are two buddies ive found, but not been able to put a name on
one is allmost identical to "ronaldoraptor" except for a few annoying detail differences in the crest, but it might as well just be aesthetic details given by the cast artists.

the other one should be a khaan, or khaan sp. something?
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 22, 2005
The top one appears to be new, has a Conchoraptor-like skull but has Ingenia-like hands. It could very well be Ingenia.

The second one is probably fake, and the skull is certainly not real.
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:iconzegh8578:
ZEGH8578 Featured By Owner Jul 22, 2005
just like that? what would be the purpose of making up a oviraptorid?
it -looks like- ronaldoraptor, at first half glance, so its probable thats what they wanted to make a cast of..
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 22, 2005
The skull is based on the original slab, of which casts are numerous and prolifically sold. My information comes from detailed photos of such a slab and a few of the original. Not too detailed :( A friend recently acquired a cast of a second skull of the same species, most likely, and this, too, doesn't have those ridges this mount has. Thus far, the appears to be fake. The skeleton is based on GIN 100/42, for the most part, as well it seems as that of mounts of Ingenia.
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:iconzegh8578:
ZEGH8578 Featured By Owner Jul 22, 2005
just like that? what would be the purpose of making up a oviraptorid?
it -looks like- ronaldoraptor, at first half glance, so its probable thats what they wanted to make a cast of..
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:iconjeffquinn:
jeffquinn Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2005
yay! extant theropods for a change! and yes, oh so very cute. i should try one of these some time...
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2005
Sorry for the lateness. Yes, this type does take a while....
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June 28, 2005
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