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Anurognathidae Panoply by Qilong Anurognathidae Panoply by Qilong
Excluding Dendrorhunchoides, Anurognathidae represent a suite of weird, short/wide-headed, long-winged probably insectivore pterosaurs. Grey areas are impressions of bones, and are more speculative than the white regions, which are preserved material. This excludes more extensive but smaller material of Anurognathus.
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:iconinvisiblecatfish:
InvisibleCatfish Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2008  Hobbyist General Artist
Awesome! I've NEVER seen pterosaurs like that before. Are they new finds?
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:iconevenape:
Evenape Featured By Owner Apr 18, 2010  Student Traditional Artist
Angurognathus is an old find

Bactrachognathus is from the 80s

And Jeholopterus is from something like 2004

So angurognathid have been found for a long time, just without any publicity (Btw, WWD do pictured this little critters as vampires)
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
WWD did NOT picture these guys as vampires. The show you're talking about was "Primeval". WWD actually portrayed Anurognathus pretty accurately, as insect-eaters.

The whole idea of portraying them as vampires was cooked up by David Peters, an advertising artist who occasionally did dinosaur art and now considers himself an "expert" on pterosaurs. Problem is, his restorations are downright bonkers, and he used photoshop of all things to produce his bizarre results. He never looked at most of the fossils in person, he just photoshopped pictures of them and misinterpreted digital artifacts of photoshop as ACTUAL soft tissue structures (crazy-long tails with a puff of fuzz at the end, weird sail-like structures on the back, wings too short to fly, crazy crests all over the head and neck that looks like something out of a Dr. Seuss book, and imaginary vampire fangs (it turns out the "fangs" were really based on a single "fang" which was in reality nothing more than a displace shard of bone on the face, not an actual tooth. In life it would not have stuck out at all. Not only that, he claimed pterosaurs were actually descended from lizards rather than archosaurs, a theory which has no solid evidence to support it (much like the whole "birds are crocodiles not dinosaurs" fringe theory that Feduccia and Martin try to rem down everyone's throats).

Needless to say, Peters' credibility instantly went down the crapper. Which is very sad, since his dinosaur art (and even some of his earlier, more conventional pterosaur art) is actually very well-done.
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:iconyutyrannus:
Yutyrannus Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Actually, Primeval didn't either. It showed them like flying piranhas, not like vampires. 
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
Well it's still total fantasy, they were still nothing like that in real life. Their teeth are not serrated and have wide gaps between them, which is terrible for slicing flesh but good for catching bugs.
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:iconyutyrannus:
Yutyrannus Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Oh I know, I'm just pointing out that they don't act like vampires. In fact, a vampire bat-like anurognathid is much more likely than a piranha-like one (not that I agree with David Peters). 
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:iconevenape:
Evenape Featured By Owner Mar 22, 2011  Student Traditional Artist
Whoops, I mean that they did potray Anurognathus as filling oxpecker-like niches which
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
which.......... which what?

Yes WWD did show them as an oxpecker-like animal. They may have done this because they were so small and ate insects. The problem is that Anurognathus itself has never been found in any large sauropod megafauna. It's just known from a few small German islands. So it's all theory (even though it's a very attractive theory and you probably won't find too many people denying it).
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:iconevenape:
Evenape Featured By Owner May 19, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
(Might be obsolete now, but)

Which... are sometimes parasitic and hemophagic, but mostly helpful to megafauna around them
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
But what about Europasaurus? That's a likely candidate....
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:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
Possibly... though I like the thought of them having symbiosis with something a lot bigger.
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Daxiatitan? Big enough? :D
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(1 Reply)
:iconpaleo-king:
Paleo-King Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
Sure? I thought it was a late Cretaceous sauropod... Euhelopus might be a better candidate if Jeholopterus was living in the Early Cretaceous.
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:iconevenape:
Evenape Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2011  Student Traditional Artist
Wikipedia said that Borealosaurus was from the Early Cretaceous, I'm not sure about it though...
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:icononyxsoulclaw:
Onyxsoulclaw Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2008
Looks like it has pirrana in it, very cute. Nice work on this you never stop amazing me with your work. Please keep it up and happy drawing.
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