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A Strange Collective by Qilong A Strange Collective by Qilong
Here is assembled, and scaled, the Unenlagiinae, a subset of the well-known Dromaeosauridae, but less known in the particulars. Little Rahonavis is barely visible at this scale.
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:iconamethyst2016:
Amethyst2016 Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
You forgot to add feathers.
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:iconbabbletrish:
babbletrish Featured By Owner Jun 30, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
Beautiful! Thanks for the great skeletal reference as always!
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jun 30, 2012
Thanks!
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Unenlagia's quite big
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Sep 2, 2011
But seemingly gracile, so not very bulky.
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:icongonzalezaurus:
Gonzalezaurus Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2010
Hello Everyone:
Sorry for intruding on this conversation and excuse my bad English.
My name is Jorge Gonzalez, and have participated in the discoveries of Unenlagia comahuensis, and Buitreraptor Neuquenraptor gonzalezorum argentinus.
He illustrated his bones for various scientific publications. I can tell you Neuquenraptor Unenlagia and are probably the same genus, are found in the same field and are of a similar size. There is a time difference between them because they appear in two slightly different levels, but the difference is very small.
Unenlagia bones that have not repeated and therefore Neuquenraptor Dr Novas believed they were different species. dromaeosaurios first from South America.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2010
While this is most likely the case, I am hesitant to refer to the same taxon material that is not directly comparable across types without additional material of one or the other taxon to demonstrate they are the same. Because of it, even though they are most likely the same taxon, they should rather be kept apart. This is not because I think any separate material should be named because it cannot be demonstrated to be the same as another taxon, though; rather, once someone names a taxon, and it might be another, it should be demonstrated to prove synonymy.
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:icongonzalezaurus:
Gonzalezaurus Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2010
When a few years later we find Buitreraptor on an expedition with Dr. Apesteguia. we realized that the bones of Buitreraptor (Gonzalo) were very similar to Unenlagia and Neuquenraptor, indicating that perhaps these two dinosaurs of the same formation, same old, same size, maybe esran the same genre ...
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:iconsteelelord:
SteeleLord Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2009
I love raptor.

good work
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:iconhaxeman:
Haxeman Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2009
yeap, I just checked the paper! the dentary of Buitreraptor and Austroraptor also have a lateral groove, wich is also present in troodontids.
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:iconhaxeman:
Haxeman Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2009
I think Shanag isn't an unenlagiine, the type (and only material) only preserves a maxilla, and I think its inclusion in unenlagiinae is due to the primitive characterit it shows, (the unconstricted root/crown trasnsition for example) wich are also present in some chinese dromeosaurids.
Neuquenraptor may be synonym with Unenlagia comahuensis.
There is a new unenlagiine from Los Barreales (Portezuelo Fm.) that is very similar to Unenlagia (both sp, from the same formation, same quarry in the case of U. paynemili) thats preserves a partial cranium, neck and several dorsal vertebraes articulated and parts of the limbs.
The maxilla looks really similar to that of Austroraptor, so, we must expect all unenlagiines to have those really long and narrows skulls.
By the way! great reconstructions! Its great to see dinosaurs from Argentina!
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2009
Shanag preserves a maxilla and a dentary. The teeth are nearly identical to Buitreraptor, and the dentary preserved a lateral groove for the nutrient foramina. It is particularly distinct, although limited in material, and very comparable to unenlagiines. I would still refrain from its inclusion because of this doubt, just as there is room to include Mahakala, although it is so ... generic.
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:icontrexmaster:
trexmaster Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2009   Traditional Artist
What did these guys eat with those narrow jaws? I'm inclined towards fish.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2009
Probably actually small mammals and fish, carrion has been suggested by some, in which case they're kinda like vultures.
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:iconmaniraptora:
maniraptora Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
You may include Neuquenraptor remains in your Unenlagia restoration, since many palaeontologists propose Neuquenraptor as junior synonym of Unenlagia (If I'm right, Neuquenraptor argentinus and Unenlagia paynemili)

Great workportraying these strange animals!
The mongolian Shanag ashile is the other known Unenlagiine, but is very fragmentary, and maybe isn't worth of being illustrated.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2009
I have a difficult time including Shanag, since it would be even smaller than Rhonavis, and is just a partial skull, which I tend not to make skeletals for. Neuquenraptor is possible, but it is hard to independantly confirm it as an unenlagiine as it lacks some of the regional distinctions for the group, as the pelvis at least is missing, and the foot is only as similar as other dromaeosaurids are. Yes, it's possible, and I need to do the taxon anyway. U. paynemili is also likely to be done, but it's very incomplete.
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
SpongeBobFossilPants Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2012
You also forgot Unquillosaurus...
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2012
That depends on what it actually is....
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
SpongeBobFossilPants Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2012
What are the other options? The 36-foot-behemoth theory is pretty much dead...
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2012
So far, the "unenlagiine" theory is based on the attempt as ease of options: unenlagiines are the only known dromaeosaurs in South America, it's from SA, it seems to be a dromaeosaur, so therefore it's an unenlagiine. This argument is predicated on very little actual details.
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
SpongeBobFossilPants Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2012
What else could it be?
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2012
There is the original impression, that it is a "carnosaur." It may also be a range of other things. The problem lies in its identification.
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(2 Replies)
:iconkevcatalan:
Kevcatalan Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
Austroraptor! My favorite dinosaur.Sweet job. All these all the species in this family?
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2009
Apparently, yes.
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