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A Panoply of Oviraptorosaurs by Qilong A Panoply of Oviraptorosaurs by Qilong
A revamp, from which there will be a further revamp, of one of my most popular images: The Panoply of Oviraptorosauria.

Caudipterids are at the top right, and along the top and left are the basal, noncaenagnathid, nonoviraptorid oviraptorosaurs. In the top half are several caenagnathids, not including Caenagnathus collinsi or sternbergi; in the bottom half are oviraptorids, which now includes the newly-described Wulatelong gobiensis

Not shown include Gigantoraptor erlianensis, which would require me to double the size of this image; Luoyanggia liudianensis, which is a partial pelvis with eggs inside; Banji long, based on a partial neck and skull; the possible caenagnathid Similicaudipteryx yixianensis; Caenagnathasia martinsoni, a central Asian species; and the oviraptorid Machairasaurus leptonychus. And, of course, Rinchenia mongoliensis, for which we have much of the skeleton, but it has been so poorly made available in print that it is useless to devise a skeleton.
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:iconcaninehuntermk3:
Caninehuntermk3 Featured By Owner Sep 19, 2018  Hobbyist
Oviraptors are one of my favorite dinosaurs. They are honestly cooler than raptors and besides everyone already says that those are their favorite cause of Jurassic Park
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:iconterizinosaurus:
Terizinosaurus Featured By Owner Jul 24, 2015
GREAT JOB ;) (Wink) 
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:iconthedilophoraptor:
TheDilophoraptor Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
what is the name of the hand only Dinosaur?
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2013
Hagryphus giganteus. I have a skeletal for it now: qilong.files.wordpress.com/201… (second from the right, bottom row).
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:iconorionide5:
Orionide5 Featured By Owner May 18, 2013
The big, mostly unknown ovi at middle right: Why exactly is its head shaped like that? Its skull (based on what I see here) wasn't found, but it looks nothing like the head of any other species you illustrated.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner May 18, 2013
Supposed to be Elmisaurus rarus. As for the head shape, it's all rather speculative. I don't think the head shape or crest shape to be the same 'mongst all caenagnathids, that they all had crests.
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:iconorionide5:
Orionide5 Featured By Owner May 18, 2013
I actually meant the jaws; they form a c-shape unlike those of the other illustrated species.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner May 18, 2013
It was sketched out on the computer digitally; it wasn't meant to correspond to an interpretation of the skull. This is one of the skeletons I think I need to modify in general so that it's more ... dynamic. At the moment, it will stay this way, then when I alter it I can clean it up to make the jaw "work." However, that said, it is entirely possible that some caenagnathids do not have an S-shaped curve to their jaw margins, but were more C-shaped instead, and it was with that in mind that I departed from the conventional design. This was the opposite for Hagryphus giganteus (top left) which was produced as a copy of the Hell Creek caenagnathid there in the middle, but I made the crest essentially circular.
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:icondinobirdman:
DinoBirdMan Featured By Owner May 17, 2013  Student Artist
I like the way to make oviraptorids as "Parrot-Beaked dinosaurs" is didn't say "Egg-Thief dinosaurs" as well.
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:iconyo-snap:
Yo-Snap Featured By Owner May 17, 2013
Oviraptors are cool! :dance:
And anything related to oviraptors!
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner May 18, 2013
I heartily agree.
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:iconfragillimus335:
Fragillimus335 Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Perhaps a greyscale Gigantoraptor in the background! :) Along that vein, precisely how large was Gigantoraptor? I don't quite trust the media numbers floating around.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2013
It's pretty reliable. If I were to place a greyscale Gigantoraptor erlianensis in there, I might actually try this a bit differently, another image with silhouettes in series. I'll think about it.
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:iconfragillimus335:
Fragillimus335 Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Cool, thanks!
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
SpongeBobFossilPants Featured By Owner Dec 14, 2011
This is good, but I can't find any references to Avimimus and Similicaudipteryx being caenagnathids. Care to hook me up with a link?
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:iconspongebobfossilpants:
SpongeBobFossilPants Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2011
Gorgeous.

Say, there's a chance that Avimimus is a caenagnathid?

If you get the chance to update this again, we need a human for scale (or, alternatively, the foot of Gigantoraptor stepping in from one side of the picture).
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2011
Eh, I tend to prefer scale bars in general, since a human as an average can be tricky, and would itself need a scale bar. Consider it as heft as a small quail or whatever. Likely no more than a few pounds.
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:iconpilsator:
pilsator Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Hot damn, you revised it! Loved it since I saw your skeletals on the Dinosauricon, way back.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2011
Yes, trying to keep it relatively well-updated.
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:iconalgoroth:
Algoroth Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2011  Professional General Artist
Excellent! I've got some rather weird ideas about these dinos and your work is inspirational. :)
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2011
I appreciate that! They are weird and wonderful, indeed.
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:iconthewhiningrhino:
Thewhiningrhino Featured By Owner Dec 14, 2010
I didn't realize the family was so large. Great work! Some of those remains are awfully scrappy though.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2011
This is true; this is me trying to be comprehensive. For the record, I've not included the Triebold "Sandy" oviraptorosaur, Gigantoraptor, Hagryphus, or Machairasaurus, nor Banji (skull only). Some of them would be very, very large.
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:iconalgoroth:
Algoroth Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2011  Professional General Artist
Which is the largest???? :?:
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jul 7, 2011
Gigantoraptor erlianensis. And boy was it big.
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:iconsturmfeuer:
sturmfeuer Featured By Owner Oct 4, 2010
Great work. If I had seen this before I might have asked your allowance to use it for my skilled work last year.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2011
The work is free for use as long as you credit me.
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:iconsaintabyssal:
saintabyssal Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
GIN 100/42 looks a bit front heavy, doesn't he?
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2010
Yes. The short tail does that to ya, as well as the incredibly elongated neck. It likely has the proportionately longest neck for any nonavian theropod. But it was also very light, and wouldn't have been at much of a risk of falling over had we say, cut off Tyrannosaurus' tail at the half mark, make the neck longer, and put it in the same posture.
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:iconbrad-ysaurus:
Brad-ysaurus Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2010
I'm surprised every time I see this- the size diversity in oviraptorosaurs is really rarely appreciated.

Would that be the habitual pose of the fingers, with the tip of the thumb claw curving forward and up? Or do the claws actually point medially, and this is just a consequence of representing them in 2D? It looks a little funny to me, since it is the complete opposite of the claw orientation theropods were given for most of the 20th century.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2010
The posture of the manus is both a product of representing it flat in a 3d perspective, and attempting to represent the anatomy realistically. The articulation for the metacarpal-phalangeal joint rotates the phalanx outward (aside from the fact that the further asymmetrically the condyles of the distal first metacarpal are, the less likely the phalanx could ever parallel the second metacarpal and/or its digits). Extension of the phalanx should further exagerrate this, while flexion brings the phalanx closest in to the other digits, and the claw rotates toward the palm in flexion only. Senter and Parrish described ranges of motion for Chirostenotes, and the phalamges are mostly parallel during flexion/extension, but in oviraptoirosaurs in general (noting here that caenagnathids are deviants from the standard maniraptoran normal) the asymmetrical MCI is more like that in dromaeosaurs and troodontids, and is exagerratedly askew.

As for grasping, and inward-facing orientation for the unguals when flexing the digits, this only seems to occur in some taxa. Carpenter and others speculated on the biomechanics of the manus in Tyrannosaurus, Senter and Parrish on Chirostenotes, and so on, and they find different types of flexion., Tyrannosaurs can "grasp," while apparently so can ornithomimids (Osmolska even foud that Deinocheirus could, somewhat), but this grapsing or inward orientation during flexion in the manus of other maniraptorans only seems to occur in the third digit, due to a slight rotation of the third metacarpal palmarly, and a slight asymmetry of the distal metacarpal III (the digit at extension is almost perfectly parallel to that of the second digit).
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:iconalexanderlovegrove:
Alexanderlovegrove Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2010
Wow, so many types. I never used to like these guys when I was a kid, but the more I read about them the more fascinated I am, they are so bizarre!
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2010
They are cool beasties, my favorite group of dinos.
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:iconchirostenotes:
Chirostenotes Featured By Owner Jan 1, 2010
Cool!
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:iconexcalibur-t005:
Excalibur-T005 Featured By Owner Aug 4, 2009
This is a really cool piece of work, but there's one that I found missing - a (to my knowledge unnamed) oviraptor that had a pygostyle at the end of its tail. I checked the tails of all the buggers shown, and did not see a pygostyle anywhere.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2009
You're thinking of Nomingia gobiensis. It's there. The pygostyle is very small, so at this scale it should not be easily visible.
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:iconexcalibur-t005:
Excalibur-T005 Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2009
Ah, okay - must have missed it. Glad to see that that one's been named, though.
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:iconmichelle56:
Michelle56 Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2008  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yay for these dinos! :D
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:icontitossauro:
Titossauro Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2005  Hobbyist General Artist
Great!
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:iconnyctopterus:
nyctopterus Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2005
Oh bloody hell, Ingenia too? Something needs to be done about that dumbass rule.

Um anyway, pretty damn useful reference here - I'll certainly be using it if I need to draw an oviraptorosaur.
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2005
HAHA, thanks John! And yes, apparently another insect got taken for a vertebrate, and Barsbold Rinchen is looking for another name.
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:iconzegh8578:
ZEGH8578 Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2005
coming up soon; the ovis qilong allways decides to leave out of his panoplys?
snort grunt, hey good to see them in big format!
your small-fit-to-1/5th-of-a-screen-size one's on the dinosauricon could quickly become annoying more than helpful "huh... that is one SMALL dinosaur.. no wait, its a cough-stain on my monitor.. no wait! it IS a dinosaur!" :D
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2005
Well, Mike offered to let me post that in larger size, but I conformed. You get an idea of the gross sizes, and all of the skeletons are individually submitted as well, so that should allow some comparison. And there aren't that many really decent ovis I left out, and I SHOULD take Kakuru out, too....
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:iconzegh8578:
ZEGH8578 Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2005
no you should NOT:O
although being just a flintstone-bone left of kakuru, i think you should continue include it, maybe figure out a way to include it into the same series/style without making a whole body silouette for it, but you shouldnt exclude it.
you [i]should[/i] allso add tiresome central asian fragments as well:D
you can call it "Jaws of Kazakhstan" or something :D

very fragmentary dinos have a bad habit of being ignored when it comes to skeletal images, simply because theyre fragmentary, and the artist may expect noone to be interested in just fragments. well wrong! :-/
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:icondekeart:
dekeart Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2005
Cool :)
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:iconqilong:
Qilong Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2005
thanks!
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