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#353: Backyard eggs by Pupaveg #353: Backyard eggs by Pupaveg
Based on 2 conversations I had with 2 different people. I kinda fused their replies and tried to make it as short as possible, but it came out a bit too long in the end. I'll try to make a shorter version in the future, but for now you'll have to do it with this.

NOTE: The artist description below is unfinished. I have to go to work now, but I'll finish writing it later and type out all sources.

Part 1: fav.me/dcilswh
Part 2: fav.me/dcj31je

The process of making and passing an egg requires so much energy and labor that in nature, wild hens lay only 10 to 15 eggs per year.
The Red Jungle Fowl - the wild relatives from whom domestic layer hens are descended - lay one to two clutches of eggs annually, with 4 to 6 eggs per clutch on average. Their bodies could never sustain the physical depletion of laying the hundreds of eggs that domestic chickens have been forced to produce through genetic manipulation.

It is a common misconception that chickens are always just naturally “giving” eggs, because modern egg hens have been intensively bred to lay between 250 to 300 eggs a year.



This is more than 20 times as much as their wild counterparts, since in the wild, chickens, like all birds, lay only during breeding season - primarily in the spring - and only enough eggs to assure the survival of their genes.

Whenever I’m talking about other birds, like a great tit or a blackbird, people seem to find it normal that they only lay eggs in spring for reproductive purposes. But when it comes to chickens, the same people - even many vegans - seem to find it normal that they lay eggs every day. It’s what we’ve all been taught since we were little. Most people are so far removed from the process of “their” omelette, that they don’t even know there exist companies who breed the animals to be this way. All branches of the egg industry buy the same types of chickens. So yes, even the “free-range” chickens and organic chickens lay an extremely high amount of eggs and are far from natural. The only difference is their living conditions. And even most hobbyists starting a backyard flock mail-order their chicks from the same hatcheries that supply factory farms (a bird that’s not genetically manipulated to lay many eggs is useless to them after all). Today, chickens used for eggs - from factory farms to backyard flock - are the products of centuries of human control over their mating process.

.:F2U:. Bouncie White Chicken V2 .:F2U:. Bouncie White Chicken V1 

Reproductive issues
The most prevalent health issues that laying hens face are reproductive issues. About 90% of the (rescued) ex laying hens die from these issues. Industry birds are bred to lay over 300 eggs a year  and their reproductive tract is under enormous strain because of this. Several illnesses occur, for example infected oviducts, egg yolk peritonitis (EYP), oviduct tumors, oviducts fused together with other internal tissue, impacted oviducts etc. We will discuss a few of these issues below. It is very important to observe your hen well on a daily basis and especially how her eggs look, whether she lays eggs at all, or if she spends time in the nestbox every day.

Prevalent diseases are:
:bulletyellow: Egg Yolk Peritonitis
:bulletyellow: Adhesions of the oviduct (or adhesions of internally laid eggs)
:bulletyellow: Impacted oviducts
:bulletyellow: Tumors/ cancer
:bulletyellow: Cloaca prolaps
:bulletyellow: Deformed eggs and lashes
:bulletyellow: Stuck eggs

The diagnoses mentioned above can usually only be made by experienced (avian) vets who regularly treat chickens. Many (dutch) vets don’t even know about the possibility to implant a chicken with a Deslorelin implant (this method has been used for about 10 years in the UK now with great succes). A vet who works for the poultry industry generally can’t help with reproductive issues (because hens in the egg industry who have reproductive issues are worthless for this industry and will never be treated), so please ask further questions when your vet says he or she has experience with chickens.

Egg Yolk Peritonitis
After release, the egg yolk is supposed to go directly into the oviduct. The oviduct is a funnel shaped tube and it does happen that the yolk misses the oviduct entrance. The more eggs a hen lays, the greater this chance. The hen may be okay when this happens just once, but in laying hens this usually happens many times and is often a permanent issue. The undeveloped eggs, or yolks, end up in the belly of the hen, where they can form a mass and start infecting. This is called Egg Yolk Peritonitis (EYP).

When your hen spends a lot of time in her nestbox but no eggs come out, then it is important to act immediately: it is very likely she already has a build-up of yolks in her belly. It is also important to often feel your hens belly: if her belly grows and fluid builds up inside, she needs medical attention as soon as possible.  An infection has probably started already then. Hens who suffer from EYP need Deslorelin implants. These implants stop the production of reproductive hormones and this stops ovulation and the release of egg yolks. Egg production stops within 2 weeks of administering the implant. Because it can take 2 weeks to work, the sooner EYP is diagnosed, the better the chances for the hen with this disease.

An implant works temporarily. The duration of its efficacy is very different though: it takes between 2 to 9 months before an implant wears off. Hens who have suffered from EYP absolutely need to be implanted in time again. The looks and behaviour of the hen shows whether the implant still works or not.  When you see signs of the implant wearing off you need to re-implant as soon as possible.

Hens with EYP often get large bellies because of fluid build up inside the hen. This can cause the hen to get trouble breathing. Chickens do not have a diaphragm and therefore her organs and excessive fluid can press on her lungs, making it hard for her to breathe. A symprom of these breathing issues can be a blue comb due to oxygen deprivation (by this time it is a real emergency!). A hen with EYP probably looks sick and doesn’t do as much as she used to. In the cases of these huge fluid build-up it can be necessary to drain the belly (besides treating the infection and using implants!), or by using diuretics. Please make sure to only let an experienced vet do this: removing too much fluids can cause the hen to go into shock and die).

Deslorelin implants
These implants are very important to treat (and prevent) diseases in ex laying hens. Unfortunately the knowledge regarding these implants isn’t wide spread yet and because of the importance of these implants for hens we want to give as much information as possible. Keep in mind though we are not vets and it is important to find a good (avian) vet for your chicken(s).

What is a Deslorelin implant?
We usually just call it “implant”. This implant is a little rod that is placed under the skin of the animal. The active ingredient in the imlant is deslorelin. Deslorelin is a GnRH agonist: this substance stops the production of reproductive hormones (testosterone and estrogen). This way ovulation stops.
Years ago people in the UK started using implants to stop hens from laying eggs for health reasons.  Now implants have been used in the UK for over a decade and are being used in many other countries as well. The implant stops ovulation and therefore the hen stops laying eggs.

Many issues and diseases that are caused by egg laying can be prevented or cured by these implants. Laying hens / industry hens have been bred to lay a huge amount of eggs, egg production needs to be maximised by the industry, which puts an enourmous strain on the hen’s body. Laying this many eggs is the cause of many diseases in (rescued) laying hens.

Does my hen need an implant?
When your hen is a (rescued) laying hen, the chances are – approximately – about 90% that she will (eventually) need an implant to stay healthy and/or alive. However, often the symptoms of reproductive disease are not recognised by either owner or (inexperienced) vet. When a rescued laying hen becomes ill, it is important to first check her reproductive health. The following issues need immediate implanting of the hen:

Egg Yolk Peritonitis (infections in the belly of the hen).
These infection often develop unnoticed. The belly becomes larger, the hen’s walking is affected and the hen shows general symptoms of being unwell. In an advanced stage the infection in the belly can press on the other organs in her body and the chicken can start having breathing problems when the lungs become compressed. Often, by inexperienced people, advanced EYP isn’t recognised as such but mistaken for a lung infection, due to the bad breathing of the hen. Treatment with antibiotics does deal with (a part of) the infection, but doesn’t remove the cause. EYP often comes back when the hen keeps ovulating and egg material will keep accumulating in the hen’s belly. An implant is the best way to stop EYP from coming back. Hens who have suffered from EYP will need to be implanted regularly for the rest of their lives.

Oviduct infections and adhesions
Because eggs pass through the oviduct every day, the oviduct is prone to infections. When this happens, it is important the hen stops laying as soon as possible. Additional treatment may be needed as well. When the oviduct has been impacted or adhesions have formed, it is very important that the hen never lays again, because an egg simply cannot pass through the oviduct anymore. Surgery may be necessary to remove the impacted matter. Do keep in mind though that even when the oviduct is removed, the hen can still ovulate (ovaries cannot be removed!). So even after a salpingectomy (removal of oviduct) the hen will need implants for the rest of her life.

Cloaca prolaps
When part of the intestines come out of the hen’s cloaca, this is called a prolaps. Eggs are often the cause of this. It can be treated by suturing the cloaca, but sometimes the prolaps comes back again. If this doesn’t help, it is helpful to implant the hen to stop her from laying eggs. Her oviduct and cloaca will not be stretched out daily and her body will get some rest.

Deformed eggs
When eggs start to look weird (with scratches on them, or without shells etc) it is helpful to have the hen stop laying. Her oviduct isn’t functioning properly anymore by then and even though she may keep laying for a while, it is better to stop her laying before it will become an emergency.

Where can I get implants and how does this work?
Implants are always placed by vets. The size of the implant is comparable with a microchip for cats and dogs. The implant is inserted under the skin with a hollow needle. Usually it is placed between the shoulder blades on the back. Some vets place them in the breast muscle, but this should only be done by and experienced (avian) vet. We advise going to a vet who is experienced in implanting chickens, especially with your first implant. If there is no avian vet available we still recommend going to a regular vet and requesting the implant. Basically every vet has the implants on stock, because they are often used for chemical castration in dogs and ferrets. (there is a list of avian vets or experienced vets all over the world on the vegans with chickens page on facebook)

An implant can give side effects. Whether these occur or not differ greatly per chicken, but we want to mention them all here. Our hens don’t get the side effects (anymore). The side effects – if they occur – are strongest on the first implant, but they gradually decrease over time. If you re-implant in time, there will hardly be any side effects after a while. Side effects can be: loss of apetite, or not eating at all (this usually lasts a few days, in severe cases it is smart to tube feed your hen as well as giving her her favourite food to stimulate apetite), the hen can start moulting and the hen may be less lively (this can take a few weeks).

How long does an implant last and is one single implant sufficient?
The implant works only temporary. When the implant wears off, the reproductive system of the hen becomes active again and she will start making eggs again. In many cases it is crucial for the hen’s health never to lay eggs again, so you will need to re-implant her again in time. It takes between one to 14 days for the implant to start working.

Deslorelin implants are available in two different strenghts: 4,7mg and 9,4mg. The difference is the duration time. We nowadays only use the 9,4mg implant: we do not have to re-implant as often as with the 4,7mg, which decreases the risk of diseases occuring between implants. A rough indication of the time the implant is active: the 4,7mg implant lasts usually between 2 to 5 months and the 9,4mg implant lasts usually twice as long. We however have had implants last one month and also over one year. The duration differs per hen and also each time, so a prediction is hard to give: most important is to observe your hens for signs of the implant wearing off and as soon as you see those signs, re-implant.

What are the signs of an implant wearing off?
Usually it is easy to see when a chicken has a working implant or not. When implanted, her looks and behaviour change from a laying hen to a hen who isn’t laying eggs. A table of the signs can be found here: www.exlegkipjes.nl/kippen-ziek… But I have an English version of this table in my Pupa Vegan YELLOW book. Unfortunately I can't share it in the DA comments section because they don't have a table option. Addition: if you have a rooster: he is your best help in deciding whose implant has (almost) worn off! When you see a hen getting more attention from the rooster(s), you can be certain her implant is about to wear off.

When one or more symptoms from the chart and images above changes, this can be an indication the hen’s implant is wearing off. When your hen is looking and behaving more like a hen who is actively laying , please consider re-implanting as soon as possible. Do not wait for her to start laying eggs again, especially hens with a past of EYP will not lay actual eggs, but will likely start accumulating yolks or egg material in their bellies again. It is of vital importance to act quickly.
(addition: Billy is a good example of this. Billy died last week. She had EYP in the past but she wasn’t implanted regularly enough before she came to us, and between implants egg material had accumulated in her belly and adhesed itself to her intestines. This has caused her death now, her intestines couldn’t function anymore because of the old egg material and it had all grown together so she couldn’t have surgery anymore)

The costs of an implant

Please be aware that chickens need medical care too, before you decide to adopt a chicken. Just like cats and dogs, they are sentient beings too and deserve to be taken to a vet when they are ill.



Implant prices vary a lot depending on which country you live in and which vet you go to. We firmly believe though that the price of an implant should never be a reason not to implant: this is life saving medical care which should not be denied to anyone. Be aware that when you adopt a laying hen, you will almost certainly need this medical care to keep her healthy. Keep this in mind before you adopt them, so they will not be deprived of help because of the costs.

Extra information:

Studies were done in which was shown that Deslorelin implants can prevent or slow down ovarian cancer. Especially in laying hens (which have been bred to lay an extreme amount of eggs) the prevalence of ovarian cancer is huge. However when these hens are implanted the occurence of ovarian cancer decreases significantly.

Sources: Will type them out soon. Too busy right now. Please check back later.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconrebel-rider:
Rebel-Rider Featured By Owner Edited Mar 15, 2019   General Artist
I have noticed the production breeds will die young, but I'd note that bantams and many non-production breeds will live a long time, even without implants. I think if you had a pet chicken that wasn't a production breed, such as a bantam, it might be wise to think seriously before doing hormone treatment since, while I don't doubt the implants extend the lives of the laying breeds, I do wonder if they might do more harm than good for an animal that's likely to live 8-12 years without an implant. (I have a hen who is twelve, and I doubt she's laid an egg for years, but she stopped laying eggs on her own, not due to hormones.) 
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Edited Mar 18, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It's obvious that breeds who are bred to lay more eggs than others are at higher risk of developing reproductive issues than breeds who weren't bred for egg production. That's just common sense. But we're talking about hens who are bred for their egg production here. People shouldn't breed these puppy mill versions of the Jungle Fowl to begin with. But sadly that's still a long battle. And while we're fighting for their rights, there will be puppy-mill egg breeds who are in need of a home after farms discard them when they get reproductive issues, or when their egg production declines (often as a result of reproductive issues). To chicken breeds who are bred/genetically manipulated for their eggs, laying eggs regularly is always harmful to the animal, way more harmful than an implant ever will be, because it leeches calcium and other minerals from their bodies to form the shell and content of an egg. And on top of that it feeds common reproductive issues. I've seen chickens who almost died because of egg-related diseases like EYP (25% of all egg-laying hens die of this), completely recover after being provided an implant, and live healthily for years without egg-related health problems after that. Implants are life-saving medical care for egg-laying hen breeds, and life-saving care shouldn't be denied to anyone. The risk of egg-laying hens developing Egg Yolk Peritonitis, Adhesions of the oviduct (or adhesions of internally laid eggs), Impacted oviducts, Tumors/ cancer, Cloaca prolapse, Deformed eggs and lashes, Stuck eggs etc. is simply too high to play Russian roulette with, if one genuinely cares about their animals' well-being. Most egg-breeds die of reproductive issues without implants; owners just don't know it because they never bother to have a vet do autopsy and just assume they "just died". I had a vet who didn't know shit about chickens (nevermind implants) say that my sick chicken probably had coccidiosis. She died a slow and painful death because the medicines he provided didn't work. I now know that it wasn't coccidiosis at all; she had symptoms of EYP and needed an implant. But instead of providing her one or at least feed her eggs back to her, I took her eggs for myself like some greedy ignorant twat. I didn't know back then, but I still hate myself for not thinking further than what I was taught. Now I know better, and work with Ex-Legkipjes (a sanctuary in my country) to raise awareness about this. This is one of their many success stories with implants use: www.poultrydvm.com/cases/elsa (before and after photos included)

Just like how dogs deserve protection to prevent fleas and ticks, egg-laying breeds of chickens deserve protection to prevent and fight the aforementioned diseases, too. I find gambling with their lives (just because we want their eggs or are too greedy to pay for their well-being) and hoping they won't get sick, quite selfish tbh. I don't know why that chicken of yours stopped laying eggs; there are many reasons why this can happen (stress, disease, impacted oviducts, age, feed etc.) but I can't judge the reason over the computer. If you really want to make sure it's not due to health issues (they are slow, silent reproductive diseases) you can ask an experienced vet to examine her, as this is often not visible from the outside. Mine died of EYP at age 10, which makes her a lucky one, because the others died of other reproductive issues much sooner.
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:iconrebel-rider:
Rebel-Rider Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2019   General Artist
I would judge it's her age and breeding. She's a phoenix chicken so she's certainly not an egg laying breed. I'd guess she just quit because she's old. (12 is old for a chicken) She's been not laying long enough I would suspect whatever stopped her isn't killing her. What I'm saying is that the breeds who are meant to be pretty, not kept for egg laying/meat seem to have somewhat long lives naturally, and only lay a few eggs. so a hormone might not be the best option. (I know birth control for humans can have side effects, so I would assume the same is for chickens, and I think before using it on bantams/other non-production breeds, studies should be done to make sure it actually helps them.)
Another option, if you're trying natural methods is to not give the chickens a light, then when they go broody, let them brood for a while before beaking them. This might get them to molt in the summer/fall. Once they're done molting, it should be near winter and they'll stop laying naturally. (Note: this is for non-production breeds.)
Also, do you feed oyster shells or some other sort of calcium supplement? If you feed eggs back and the chicken gobbles down the eggshells fast, that means she's short on calcium.
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Mar 22, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Oh, then I misunderstood. But I think you misunderstood my post, too. It refers to egg-laying chicken breeds who are bred/genetically manipulated to lay an unnatural number of eggs.
Chickens will always gobble up everything I throw for them, including their own eggs. Sadly, the breeds we have here are saved from the egg industry and arrived in horrible conditions because of deficiency and reproductive diseases due to egg laying. They're always given implants, because we noticed that without them, they just die.
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:iconrebel-rider:
Rebel-Rider Featured By Owner Mar 22, 2019   General Artist
Around here there aren’t many factory farms.
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:iconangelina-l:
Angelina-L Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2019  Hobbyist General Artist
I was just wondering about this. Before my mom moved, she used to have "backyard chickens" that she got eggs from. (She later sold them to someone else, though, and she doesn't seem to plan to buy anymore.)

Looking over this, though, I really don't think she was doing a good job taking care of them. :/ Not that I didn't know that already, tbh.
Yeah, she fed them and gave them water, but... besides that. It was awful, trust me. She just kept them in a small section of the yard (that had no grass) and she never bothered to clean it. And she had like, 50 of them.
The most "medical attention" I ever saw her give was to the ones that cut themselves on the fence, but that was about it. I didn't even know they could have other medical problems until I saw this.
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
That's so sad. My chickens used to have a lot of space and we didn't keep large groups. But in the end, their health suffered because we took their eggs for ourselves and didn't give them implants (I didn't know back then).
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:iconkaleysia:
Kaleysia Featured By Owner Edited Jan 29, 2019  Hobbyist
Wow, I didn't know about these implants, thanks for the information! 
I'll try to spread it, especially amongst vegans who think that backyard hens are always ethically okay as long as you "treat them right". (as I did until know)

If someone has a breed of chicken that lays very few eggs though, is there any disadvantage for the hen if the owner eats these instead of giving her an implant?
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:iconrebel-rider:
Rebel-Rider Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2019   General Artist
The non-commercial breeds, such as bantams, tend to not lay as much and do live quite long lives. (My bantams and fancy breeds have lived 6-12 years.) I think that 10 is getting to be the upper threshold for chicken lifespans since roosters, who don't do much they wouldn't do in the wild, tend to be getting old by that time. I will agree that commercial breeds have rather short lives. A lot of the breeds that weren't bred for egg production tend to lay less and stop laying on their own as they age. I'm pretty sure the 12-year-old hen hasn't laid an egg in years. 
I feed any shells I have back to my flock and also supplement with oyster shells and milk. (I'm no vegan, and I do sell eggs.) If you want to rescue a chicken but not get implants, it might be best to rescue a non-commercial breed or roosters, and simply avoid giving then extra light, which prompts them to lay more. 
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Edited Mar 18, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The point is that it are mostly the breeds who have been bred for their egg production are the ones who need rescue. When they stop laying eggs, or when they get reproductive diseases due to egg-laying, farms often just get rid of them because they're no longer profitable. And instead of ending up in the trash can, sanctuaries and shelters take them in, give them implants to save their lives, and after they recover they find homes for them.
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:iconrebel-rider:
Rebel-Rider Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2019   General Artist
I'll admit, if you want the commercial breeds to live long lives, they probably do need the implants, but if you come across some fluffy little bantam that someone bought as a chick because it was cute, then it might not need one.
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Mar 22, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes, it depends on the breed. Meat chickens often don't need implants. But this post only refers to egg-laying breeds. 
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Always feed it back to your hens. You see, in nature chickens only lay eggs for reproductive purposes (only about 12 eggs a year). Domesticated chicken have been genetically manipulated and selectively bred to lay an unnatural number of eggs at the expense of their health. Bone decalcification, also known as osteoporosis, is one of the main causes of weak bones and bone fractures in laying hens. Birds have a medullary bone that stores calcium for eggshells. In hens, rapid egg production depletes this bone to the point of it disappearing. Hens then have to leech calcium from other parts of their bodies to continue forming hard shells, far more than they can assimilate
from their diets. This causes them to develop osteoporosis and consequent bone fractures. They also develop hypocalcemia or calcium tetany (paralysis) from using all available calcium in their bloodstream for eggs. For example: For the eggs that a hen lays during a laying period, 20-30 times as much calcium is needed than she can store in her body. As in humans, having extremely low levels of calcium in the bloodstream causes chickens to develop more minor symptoms, like numbness and disorientation, and more major and fatal symptoms, like seizures and heart attacks.  Because calcium is extracted from the bone for the eggshell, bones become more brittle. They can break faster, especially towards the end of the laying round, which is very painful.

And this is just one of the many issues a hen can get because humans bred them to be this way. Only an implant can provide full protection, and in the meantime you can limit the damage by breaking/crushing their eggs (so they'll know it's not fertilized) and put it into their food bowl and feed it back to them (the content AND the shells, too) so they can regain at least some of the lost nutrients (supplements can't replace their dietary needs) and combat reproductive diseases like EYP. Egg-laying in domesticated hens is never advantageous to the animals. Implants are life saving medical care which should not be denied to anyone. Be aware that when you adopt a laying hen, you will almost certainly need this medical care to keep her healthy. Keep this in mind before you adopt them, so they will not be deprived of help because of the costs. (It's the reason why my sanctuary doesn't accept chickens yet, if someone dumps chickens here, I take them to other sanctuaries who are bigger and can afford to take proper care of them).
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:iconkaleysia:
Kaleysia Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2019  Hobbyist
Thanks again. I'm not planning to adopt a laying hen (at least I never considered it), but I do want to adopt a cat from a shelter.
Do you happen to have any credible information if a vegan diet is possible for cats? I know they are carnivores, and I've
heard it many times that feeding them a vegan diet is cruel and not feasible without negative long term health effects for the cat, but I've never
seen anybody citing actual studies on that. It always seemed like a "common sense" thing to me (and I guess we all know how flawed that
type of thinking can be).
Reply
:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
If you want to feed your cat vegan, I suggest you feed them vegan CAT food (so NOT human vegan food) from an approved scientifically formulated, nutritionally complete brand (like Benevo, AmiCat, Evolution, Vegecat etc.) with taurine. What I personally did was order sample bags of different brands and let my animals choose.
Whatever you do, DO NOT make them homecooked vegan meals unless you have knowledge in canine nutrition. I know an idiot who does this, and feeds them a deficient diet made of potatoes, rice and beans because he's too greedy to buy actual petfood, but a cat or dog can NOT stay healthy on just that. Always buy petfood!

I happen to be working on a book about vegan petfood (Pupu Vegan CYAN), so if you're interested in more detailed info about it and sources, feel free to stick around and I'll post it up eventually. 
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Edited Feb 14, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
*Pupu Vegan MAGENTA
Not cyan.
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:iconkaleysia:
Kaleysia Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2019  Hobbyist
Okay, thanks for answering my question :)
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
You're welcome! Have a nice day!
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:iconkaleysia:
Kaleysia Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2019  Hobbyist
Thanks, you too! :)
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:icongrassymania:
grassymania Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2019
Heartbouncing chicking  8DHeart   Chickens are friends, not food.
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
:la: Yeah!
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:iconsoldier667:
Soldier667 Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I have a rooster. I saved him from an egg factory.

I didn't know there was a way to save hens. Thanks for telling me.
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
You're welcome!
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:iconemanueltheodorus:
EmanuelTheodorus Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2019
Implants, huh? Never really know you can do that to a chicken.
Also, the comic's art style looks quite similar to some of the older comics you made. Probably the eggs one and the honey one.
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yeah, they're from my previous book: Pupa Vegan YELLOW. I haven't had the time to draw much lately, so I'm posting some of the older pages on here.
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:icongrey-terminal:
Grey-Terminal Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2019
Where I live now they have chickens and sell the eggs. Someone told me that they get laying flour. Otherewise they would not lay so much eggs.
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Edited Jan 28, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
With or without the flour, egg laying hen breeds always lay an unnatural number of eggs. The flour stimulates egg production even more, depriving their bodies of essential nutrients like calcium, and feed reproductive issues like EYP.
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:icongrey-terminal:
Grey-Terminal Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2019
That was what I mean. I wonder why it is ok to people to manipulate animals so much
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Because most people are greedy and selfish, sadly. That's why we must educate to help humanity morally evolve.
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:icongrey-terminal:
Grey-Terminal Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2019
Yes but that is not easy
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
True. Convincing people that they shouldn't enslave and kill others has always been hard and took a lot of time. But remember than no form of oppression will last forever.
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:iconseasstryu1521:
seasstryu1521 Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Didnt know of their implants
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Many people don't know, which is why I made this comic.
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:iconseasstryu1521:
seasstryu1521 Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
kind of destroys the whole veggan argument
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It does. "Veggan" makes no sense if you avoid animal abuse for ethical reasons.
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:iconlualady:
LualaDy Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2019  Professional Traditional Artist
when I was a kid, there were hens at my grandparents'
out of 10 only one of them was laying eggs, and not every single day!
when one had an egg it was like wow the divine has touched her lol
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yeah, it depends on the chicken breed you buy. Some lay more than others. The more eggs they lay, the higher the chances of disease and deficiencies are. But if they lay more than only spring for reproductive purposes, always give them implants. Better to be safe than to be sorry.
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:iconlualady:
LualaDy Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2019  Professional Traditional Artist
yeah poor things
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