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#352: The labor intensive process of creating eggs by Pupaveg #352: The labor intensive process of creating eggs by Pupaveg

PART 1:

  #351: Eggs (2) by Pupaveg

I will update this artist description with sources and more info as soon as I finish this chapter. Please wait for it. ^_^

:iconpupaveg: Art

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:iconrebel-rider:
Rebel-Rider Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2018   General Artist
Urine? Birds don't have urine, at least not like mammals. 
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist

Mammals remove excess nitrogen from their bodies by converting it to a dilute solution of urea, stored in the bladder. Birds convert nitrogen to uric acid instead: this is metabolically more costly but saves water and weight, as it is less toxic and doesn't need to be diluted so much. Birds therefore don't have a urethra, and don't pee - all waste leaves via the anus.

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:iconrebel-rider:
Rebel-Rider Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2018   General Artist
I know. You said they had urine, when it's really only feces. 
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Edited Aug 21, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist

Chickens only have one hole, so their waste is all mixed within the intestines before it's evacuated. Basically the poop, pee and pay eggs from the same hole. It's not exactly done in the same way as mammals do, but it pretty much narrows down to the same: getting rid of waste.

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:iconsimoncaneplz:
SimonCaneplz Featured By Owner Aug 3, 2018
How old can chickens live if they weren't being bred to lay more eggs?
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:iconrebel-rider:
Rebel-Rider Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2018   General Artist
The oldest I've seen is about 11, one of which was a rooster, so no egg production. I've heard of 21, but I'm not sure I believe it. My 11 year old hen is doing okay, but getting old. Even my bantams, who had low egg production only lived for about eight years. (Commercial breeds that lay seem to live five or so years on average.)
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Wild chickens can become 30 years old.
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:iconrebel-rider:
Rebel-Rider Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2018   General Artist
You're talking about a wild chicken in captivity, NOT a wild chicken in the wild, which would have a lifespan of a few years due to predators. Also, that's a very rare case, I would guess, such as saying "humans can become 120 years old" or claim that dogs live for 29 years. 
The oldest I've seen is about 11, one of which was a rooster, so no egg production. I've heard of 21, but I'm not sure I believe it. My 11 year old hen is doing okay, but getting old. Even my bantams, who had low egg production only lived for about eight years. 
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
No, you aren't listening. Wild chickens have a much longer lifespan than the puppy-mill versions of them humans have bred in captivity. My point is that these should stop being bred to be that way just to benefit humans. It's no better than puppy-mill dogs imo: breeding animals at the expense of their health just because humans want something from them (eggs, or a cute big chihuahua head on a small body etc.) The puppy-mill domestic chickens will never become as old as their wild ancestors, because they suffer all kinds of health problems on the long run, but one can still maximize their lifespan a bit by using implants. I work with a chicken sanctuary on this chapter and they give their rescue chickens implants so they live many years longer than their sisters which are used for eggs in the industries.
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:iconrebel-rider:
Rebel-Rider Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2018   General Artist
So, how long do your rescue chickens live? 
The AVERAGE lifespan of any wild animal is generally significantly shorter than the lifespan of a wild animal in captivity, barring wild animals like whales that have few predators and other species that do poorly in captivity. A wild chicken in the wild will have a rather short lifespan due to being eaten. (For comparison, their close relatives, pheasants, are lucky to live three years in the wild, and wild turkeys are also lucky to make it past three.)
The 30 years thing sounds more like a world record to me than an actual lifespan. Unless you can find multiple sources saying jungle fowl live to be 30, I can't believe it. 
I am aware the commercial breeds die young. I've noticed this with my own flock, but I still don't believe the claim of 30 years old as an average lifespan. 
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Aug 21, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The point is that wild chickens their bodies don't kill themselves and that their maximum natural lifespan isn't affected by their own body. Their bodies have evolved to survive in nature. They don't get egg-layer fatigue or any other creepy diseases humans have bred domestic chickens to have. Domestic chickens their bodies pretty much destroy themselves slowly because humans bred them to benefit humans rather than the animals themselves. So even if a wild chicken dies in nature because a fox gets them or something, it's not their own body that kills them. They have a chance to change their own misfortune. Therefore comparing wild animals to puppy-mill versions humans bred is flawed. It's like justifying breeding dogs with health problems by saying "but wolves often die in nature before they reach their maximum lifespan". Animals with health problems shouldn't be bred at all - and if we oppose puppy-mills that intentionally breed animals with health problems, we should also oppose doing the same to other animals. If you're interested in reading all about the rescue chickens here and how the implants save them, feel free to check it out on the website: www.exlegkipjes.nl/
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:iconrebel-rider:
Rebel-Rider Featured By Owner Aug 21, 2018   General Artist
Interesting. I didn't know anyone did that.
Most of my hens are more fancy breeds, so they tend to live longer because they're not so heavily bred to lay. (Like I said, I've got one who is eleven and is probably the most similar to jungle fowl that I have.) 
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yeah, there are many different breeds of chickens. The worst are the ones from the factory farm egg industries, who are bred to lay up to 500(!) eggs a year. They usually die around age 2 of reproductive organ problems. I think that companies who breed them to be like that are the epitome of animal abuse (Hy-Line and ISA for example).
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(1 Reply)
:iconseasstryu1521:
seasstryu1521 Featured By Owner Aug 3, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It's like if you gave birth that often.  Falk about hard
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yep.
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