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#351: Eggs (2) by Pupaveg #351: Eggs (2) by Pupaveg

The process of making and passing an egg requires so much energy and labor that in nature, wild hens lay only 10 to 15 eggs per year.



The Red Jungle Fowl - the wild relatives from whom domestic layer hens are descended - lay one to two clutches of eggs annually, with 4 to 6 eggs per clutch on average. Their bodies could never sustain the physical depletion of laying the hundreds of eggs that domestic chickens have been forced to produce through genetic manipulation.

It is a common misconception that chickens are always just naturally “giving” eggs, because modern egg hens have been intensively bred to lay between 250 to 300 eggs a year.


This is more than 20 times as much as their wild counterparts, since in the wild, chickens, like all birds, lay only during breeding season - primarily in the spring - and only enough eggs to assure the survival of their genes. Whenever I’m talking about other birds, like a great tit or a blackbird, people seem to find it normal that they only lay eggs in spring for reproductive purposes. But when it comes to chickens, the same people - even many vegans - seem to find it normal that they lay eggs every day. It’s what we’ve all been taught since we were little. Most people are so far removed from the process of “their” omelette, that they don’t even know there exist companies who breed the animals to be this way.

SOURCES: (See Pupa Vegan YELLOW once it's finished. I will also post a list of sources on DeviantArt under this post once the chapter is 100% finshed).

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I have a whole chapter on eggs in Pupa Vegan YELLOW. I'm still working on the art, but I want to thank Ex-Legkipjes (www.exlegkipjes.nl) so much for their help regarding the content of this chapter. Once it's done, I will share a free PDF of this chapter with all of you.

#327: Plants have feelings by Pupaveg #335: Listen by Pupaveg #563: Artist: 5 years vegan by Pupaveg  #551: Love is not compatible with killing (9) by Pupaveg #346: Vegan meat by Pupaveg
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:iconikrines:
IKrines Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Well, The Danish countrybreed(in which is the European oldest breed, it looks like the wild hen), do lay around up to 200 eggs(under freeranging outdoor conditions, as it is not ideal as cage chickens), and it is not a breed that have been through heavy breeding since late 19th century(and even that was less than others chickens). However a Industrial production hens might be more like 400 or 500 eggs per year(and typical those only last a year). Modern chickens lose fertility faster than wild, however they have same ammount eggs they can produce in a life time, around 400, so the wild chicken can lay more eggs, as they are bigger risk of losing their offspring.
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Wild chickens, like jungle fowls, lay around 12 eggs a year (mainly in spring) for reproductive purposes, just like every other bird.
Hundreds of eggs a year is just not natural: humans bred chickens to be that way.
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:iconikrines:
IKrines Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
What I am saying a wild chicken has potiental to lay up to 400 eegs in total in their lifetime. Most Don't
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
A wild chicken doesn't lay 400 eggs in a total lifetime. Only domesticated chickens do, in their short lives.
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:iconbryant2003:
Bryant2003 Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2018
My chickens lay nowhere near 300 a year each. They are well cared for. Organic feed and supplements , no antibiotics , and all the bugs and fresh greens they can even get their hungry little beaks on. I think that number is for factory chicken eggs and their chickens. With all those artificial hormones, antibiotics,& in humane confinement and treatment. Not to mention the artificial light too keep them laying year round that I turn adds stress and shortens their lifespan. It is rather disgusting and disgraceful treatment of a living animal , even if their purpose is to produce or become food.
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Sep 8, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I didn't say that all GMO chicken breeds lay the same amount of eggs. Unless your chickens are jungle fowls who lay about 12 eggs a year during spring for reproductive purposes, they too are from a manmade genetically manipulated species. If you keep chickens and take their eggs away from them, you are encouraging their genetically manipulated bodies to produce more eggs to replace the others, depriving their body of essential nutrients food and supplements can't catch up with. This will lead to health problems in the future, such as egg layer fatigue, bone problems etc, which cannot be prevented by just feeding them food and supplements. If you want to prevent your chickens from developing disease, I suggest you ask a vet with experience on this to give them implants. That is the only way to maximize their life and prevent them from developing disease. You can also help by no longer breeding or buying chickens like this from breeders. Chickens shouldn't be intentionally bred like puppy mill dogs with potential health problems, just for human pleasure. Because that is disgusting and a disgraceful treatment of a living being.
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:iconrebel-rider:
Rebel-Rider Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2018   General Artist
Actually, I think the process of incubating the eggs (and raising chicks) is more of a drain for the hen than laying them. I've noticed that the hens I have raising chicks tend to lose condition a lot more than ones who don't go broody. (They'll sit on a nest all day and only eat and drink once a day.) 
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The problem is that humans breed animals in a way to increase profits (either as egg machines or breeding machines), at the expense of their bodies. Naturally wild chickens don't have a problem with neither. Because they breed and raise their young in the same way and quantity other birds do, without their body suffering over it.
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:icontabeart:
TabeArt Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2018  Student General Artist
Imagine if you had your period 300 times a year >n<
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Ugh... awful!
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:iconmrsvolv:
MrsVolv Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2018  Professional General Artist
That's a sad truth. But if I may have a question, so you know what about the hens ppl keep but not for eggs or meat. More like just to take care of them? I think they still lay as many eggs, right? Because they are genetically human-created like this nowadays.

I was just thinking of one day making a place for rescue hens to keep them safe. And just thinking what's best for them. Don't want them to breed, but they will lay eggs anyway I think, just not fertilized... If I collect those eggs, will they feel like being forced to replace them and lay more? Or they will just lay the same amount of eggs they are genetically made to, and there is nothing I can do?
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes, sadly most backyard chickens in Western cultures come from the same shit breeders who breed animals to be this way. Wild chickens like the red junglefowl for example in India lays a normal amount of eggs for reproduction purposes. But that's why no one keeps them. Because even the "happy" backyard chicken owners don't want chickens who can't lay eggs. 

If you ever rescue chickens from the egg industry, taking away their eggs will result into laying more, depriving them of nutrients. But you can cook the eggs, grind them up (including the shells) and feed it back to them so they can regain the lost nutrients they can't get back from their feed. However, chickens from the egg industry are most likely to die prematurely from common egg-laying hen diseases because of the way they were bred. There is still hope though. You can ask your vet to give your chickens an implant. This will stop the egg-laying and improve their health, and avoid many diseases that way. You will see them grow healthy and old overtime because of it. The sanctuary website I mentioned in my artist description shows some really good examples of this.
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:iconrebel-rider:
Rebel-Rider Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2018   General Artist
The only way to make them not "replace" the eggs is to let them hatch and raise chicks,(Some have completely lost that instinct) but if you do that, you have to cull a bunch of the males, which I'm guessing a vegan wouldn't want to do. 
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Aug 21, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Or you can simply stop breeding them?
Or (if they are rescues) give them implants. That helps, too.
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:iconrebel-rider:
Rebel-Rider Featured By Owner Aug 21, 2018   General Artist
I didn't know there were implants. I'd never heard if it in the US. 
I was saying you breed them because a hen who hatches chicks produces less eggs, and that was the only humane way I knew to stop egg laying, but an implant would probably work better.
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Implants aren't very well known yet, but more and more vets are using them and I hope to publish a chapter about it. I've seen the most devestated chickens on the edge of dying being saved and living many more years because of them. 
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:iconsimoncaneplz:
SimonCaneplz Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2018
And that's alot.
Chickens in its original form, only lays eggs so that the eggs will hatch into new chicks and yet here in alot of factory farms, they lay alot of eggs.
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Indeed. It's sad that humans freak out over chihuahua's being bred with health problems, but as soon as people do the same to chickens, it's suddenly fine.
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:iconmajestic-colossus:
Majestic-Colossus Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2018
But why don't you eat eggs? - they ask. Eggs are not animals - they say.

The chickens that mass-produce eggs are subject to:
-Stress
-Extremelly small cages/lack of space and mobility
-Unclean cages
-Darkness
-A lot of health conditions related to the overproduction of eggs

Not to mention that all of them will be killed as soon as they're no longer useful to the industry. And what about those who don't produce eggs, more specifically, male chicks? Grinded alive.




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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
In the egg industry, only females are required because males don't lay eggs. As such, in the breeding process, the males and females are divided when they hatch, and the males are killed immediately as they serve no purpose. Subsequently, their sisters go on to be kept in captivity until their egg production is no longer profitable to the farmer, at which point they have their throats slit. This is generally at around one or two years old. The average lifespan of a chicken is eight years.
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:icongrey-terminal:
Grey-Terminal Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2018
I find it really disturbing, that people find it totally ok, to overbreed animals just to use.
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Indeed. It's no better than puppy mills when you think about it. #doublestandards
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:icongrey-terminal:
Grey-Terminal Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2018
that is true><
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:iconseasstryu1521:
seasstryu1521 Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
yea
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
:(
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:iconlualady:
LualaDy Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2018  Professional Traditional Artist
yess
like people who think bees "produce" honey (for us humans) and cows "produce" milk (for us)
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:iconpupaveg:
Pupaveg Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Indeed.
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:iconrebel-rider:
Rebel-Rider Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2018   General Artist
Our cows like to be milked because they get treats. Doesn't matter if they need milked or not, they come to the barn to get milked even though the calves are with them.
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:iconlualady:
LualaDy Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2018  Professional Traditional Artist
because humans selected breeds of cows and made the domestic cows, over the history, have more and more and more milk
same with sheep, the domesticated sheep now have way too much fur

however, can one think it's ok to keep a cow or a sheep only for their milk and their wool? and kill them once they don't "produce" enough anymore?
but we're not talking about ONE cow, or ONE sheep
the actual numbers are to faint
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