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Curtains Closed

#LITplease has officially launched, which means there will no longer be any updates here on the ProsePlease account. We are keeping the old prompts here for your inspiration, but we will no longer be accepting submissions for them. We hope all our members will join over at #LITplease and enjoy our all new contest. The first Nonfiction Nook prompt has also been posted! Thank you for your loyalty over the years and we promise you won't be disappointed by the new arrangement over at LITplease.
Where Did You Grow Up: It's no mystery that we have deviants from all parts of the world. In an ever-growing community, it wouldn't be too shocking if you chanced upon a fellow deviant from Easter Island. So where are you from? What was your neighborhood like? Did you grow up surrounded by the ocean? Sand? Skyscrapers? Tell us about your part of the world!
Texas 1957 by rlkirkland


It's Halloween: Is 0ur October Nonfiction Nook prompt, write about A childhood memory perhaps, that wild party, a unique costume, classroom or office hijinks.  Funny, or spooky it doesn't matter... write!
Pumpkin Paranoia by rlkirkland


Away From Home: What is your most memorable experience away from home? A family vacation? Your first time abroad? Perhaps the first year you spent away at college? Write about it and tell us.
Retreating With Horses by Friedemann
Biscuits and Baths by rlkirkland

Our chosen deviation from August's prompt, "That Place" is:

That Place: Write about a place that is special to you. Maybe it is your room, or the house you grew up in, or the toilet stall in which you hid from bullies at school. Whatever it is, write about that place and what it is that makes it special. Connect it to your present day, if it's a place from your memory.
Closer to Heaven by mizuyo
Sweet Sanctuary by rlkirkland
The Old Apartment Room by Friedemann
This is Home by Remaerd
A Patrol Leader's Bedroll by PaperDart


Earliest Memory: Think back to your earliest memory. It doesn't necessarily have to be of the first image you remember; pick the earliest vivid memory. Reconstruct the details and write a creative piece of nonfiction. It doesn't have to have a strong point to make about life--this assignment is all about reconstructing the details and telling a real life story.
Choking on an Banana by tetemeko
Getting Away From It All by Schroduck
I was 9. A Memoir by midnight-eclipses


The How-To: Write a how-to article explaining to the reader how to do something in which you feel you have the expertise to guide them.
What it Takes to be a Distance Education Student by ATrue


Contemplation: A contemplative essay is one of the most lenient essay forms. The concept starts with the observation of something very small and seemingly insignificant, and expands out as the essay progresses to consider how the object or thing relates to life on a grander scheme. Look for Virginia Woolf's "The Death of the Moth" for an example.
Tea by PunkPygmiePuff
Contemplations over Porcelain by ATrue
:bulletblue:November 2009
There are lovely things all over the world... emotions, nature, and even people. Write a story about something beautiful. Write a love story, a pained experience, anything... As long as you make it beautiful, it's your heart's desire.

:bulletblue:October 2009
When you think of the word primitive what comes to mind? Something innate? Think of "primitive" in terms of a story. What stories do you consider innate? Is it true love, glory, fairytales, parables? Write a "primitive" story, something that you think expresses what it is that humanity has been trying to say for centuries, but retold from your unique perspective.

<A href=mizuyo.deviantart.com/art/Sore…">Sore Eyes by mizuyo


:bulletblue: September 2009
Write a story from the point of view of something that would not normally have thoughts, let alone be the main character in a story. Basically, use personification to turn something everyday into a masterpiece! Write the story of a Geisha fan, take a pencil for a whirl, or anything else you could think of. The possibilities are endless.
Personification... inanimate objects or abstractions are given human qualities or are represented as possessing human form.

Rope by vital-organs
Crushed Destiny by thespes
The House by LadyLouve
The-Line-that-Divides by mizuyo
My Falling by Sepulchral-Roses
What am I? by midnight-eclipses


:bulletblue: August 2009

Write a story that focuses on a single character and his or her development. The plot itself may be incomplete; the transformation of the character should be the focus. To make things more interesting, place the character outside his or her comfort zone. For example: is she traveling? Is he starting at a new workplace or school? Is he or she entering an important new phase of life? No matter where they are, illustrate their transformation clearly and be creative!

The Change by this-silent-scream


:bulletblue: July 2009

Nonfiction! Write an autobiographical anecdote, a short exerpt from your own life. Nonfiction doesn't have to be boring and it's not just for people with unusual life experiences. Even if you think your life has been boring, you can write something unique and interesting by changing up how you write it. You can make it funny or suspenseful, for example, just by leaving out details and not revealing them until the end. Only two rules: it has to be written from the first-person perspective, and it has to all be true!

Happy Mother's Day? by cr8edbyamy
A Wednesday Morning by thespes
Finding the Theatre by thespes
Katrina by vital-organs


:bulletblue: June 2009

One of the earliest forms of what we recognize today as a novel was the epistolary novel--a novel in the form of letters. Tell a story using letters (or emails) as the narrative style.

Rupture by PlotParadox


:bulletblue: May 2009

April showers bring May flowers: write a story about a time when an unfortunate event turned out to lead the something much better in the end.

A Symbol for the Sun by Bertron-the-Prophet
Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow by Sepulchral-Roses


:bulletblue: April 2009

You are rummaging around in your attic, and you find something shocking. What is it? Adoption papers with your name on it? Incriminating documents? A human skull? The possibilities are endless! Write a story of any length and style, but it must be from the first person perspective.

Through the Lense by Filosofia
Mist by LadyLouve
Family Secret by Silssu


:bulletblue: September 2008

There was a tragedy a long time ago; you thought you had recovered from it well. But now, something is happening to make you believe that the tragedy was no accident. And you’re not entirely sure another tragedy won’t happen again…

Write about this tragedy, and the situation leading up to your suspicions. Is the tragedy supernatural in nature? Or is it the plotting of another person? Only you can decide.

Rhea by UpmostHilarity
Steps at the Corridor by LadyLouve


:bulletblue: June 2008

What family is ever complete without the outsider, the black sheep of the family, the one who doesn't fit in with the rest of them? Every family has one. Sometimes it's good, sometimes it's bad. Writing from the side of your choice (misfit or family member), write a short story showing their perspective on the situation.

Untitled by thespes
Comprendez by rosesnthorns65
The Sparrows Nest by LadyLouve


:bulletblue: May 2008

We all love fairytales for different reasons, but commonly everyone wants everything the happy ending, which is sometimes in contrast to reality. Write a short fairy tale where the princess does not live happily ever after.

Love's Grief by Fubunmei
Arman and the Flaming Dragon by JinShiranai
The Story of Princess Tania by WhoisAenna
Red Hood by sejongkim1979


:bulletblue: April ProsePrompt

All stories are based around central conflict right? Write a story about an event that goes perfectly, but add in your anti-perfectist character and see what happens next. Perhaps some comedy may come from this, but that's up to you, the writer.



:bulletblue: March 2008

Fact: All life ends in death... but why should that stop writers? Write a short story where death ends in life.

A New Beginning by WhoisAenna
It Begins and Ends With Life by SilentImpression
That Incredible Lifting Feeling by flashbackbingo
Beginning At The End by Ponymadgal
I Am Become Death by Dagger13
The Beginning by lenfach


:bulletblue: February 2008

Did the cities turn to ash or did the world decay by plague? Heck, does it even matter to your character any more? Write the final journal entry of a person who is witnessing or has witnessed the end of the world.

Dear Mama, It's All Ending by doverangel13
Dear Dairy by WhoisAenna
Just The End Of The World by no-modern-swinger
Finale-Diary of a Madman by Incathuga
The Smiley Face in the Sky by SilentImpression
Diary, End of the World by Silssu
The End by A-WildDog
Astronauts and Cosmonauts by Amberous


:bulletblue: January 2008

They say the first sentence should grab a reader's attention. Write a short story that starts with the following sentence, and let your imagination play with what comes next.

"Oh my God... What have we/I done!"


He  Looked At The Painting by EHB
A Single Shot by WhoisAenna
The Burning House of Lives by Silssu
Nils: The White Goose Speaks by Kestrad
A Question Of Live Or Death by A-WildDog
In case you missed the announcement of the Creative Nonfiction Contest, the original news article can be found here.

The deadline for entries is November 15, 2009 at 10pm EST. If you haven't started writing yet, it's time to hop to it, and if you have started, it's time to polish your essay off and send it in.

Please read the original news article for all the details, but the gist of it is to write a creative essay that centers around one of your personal September to December holiday experiences. Pick any annual celebration or observance that falls within those four months and tell us about it in your unique voice and style.

We hope to see your entry in our Contest Collection soon!

Community Critics

Journal Entry: Sun Oct 18, 2009, 7:54 PM






Critique has always been popular among writers. It is oxygen for any would-be writer, the nutrition needed to support growth and development. Which is why Community Critics is invaluable to ProsePlease. This section provides the opportunity for writers not only to receive feedback but also to give back to the community by offering their time and experience in critiquing the works of others.


How does Community Critics operate?


The principle behind Community Critics is that a critique must be earned. Set aside some time to critique and appraise the works of others and then you earn the equivalent result: a critique of your own. This is how the whole concept works:

:bulletblue: Once a month, Community Critics will list two submissions. The first submission can be submitted by any member of ProsePlease. The second submission however, must be earned.

:bulletblue: Every month, the best critique will be showcased and listed. Most importantly, the person who gives the most in-depth critique for that month can nominate any of their prose for critique the following month. This way, they earn the right to the second submission.

:bulletblue: But what if I suck at giving Critiques? I'll never earn a place as the second submission. :(
No problem. Just keep applying for the first submission. It may take a little longer for your submission to be critiqued, but it does mean your work will eventually get critiqued. Just make sure your submission meets the guidelines (continue reading for the guidelines). In the mean time, practice giving critiques! Sometimes, there is as much to learn from critiquing the works of others as there is writing.


How to submit to Community Critics:


Before submitting your piece for critique, you MUST read and follow the two articles, A Positive Critique and The Art of Refining Prose. If your submission has clearly not undergone basic editing in spelling, punctuation and grammar, then your submission will not be accepted for critique. We expect the quality of all submissions to be of college/university level, at the very least highschool. This is Community Critics, not a basic English lesson.

1. Please note ProsePlease with the subject line "Community Critics".

Include the following:
a. A link to your prose or :thumbnail:
b. The title of your prose
c. A brief description (50-100 words) of what areas you're concerned about. Is there a particular part that you really want the critiques focused on? Maybe you're experimenting with a style or tone? The better you detail what you're after, the more tailored the critique will be.

All submissions will be listed on a first-in, first-served basis.


How Can I Give Critiques?


Well, this is very simple. There are two ways you can do this.

1. Simply post your critique like you do any other comment.
2. If a piece allows for use of the Critique system, you may use that instead.

If you are not sure how to give a critique, feel free to take a look at your past selections (listed near the bottom) for examples.



Current Listings: August-October, 2009


Hey guys, this is midnight-eclipses! I'm taking over CC for the time being. I'm hoping to get this part of the club up and rockin'! So, I'm going to post the next two people that are up next for Critiques. Just be sure to submit your work to me everyone! I want to make sure this valuable part of the club is up and running for everyone to use!

I'm going to leave these two up for another couple of weeks. ^-^ There's only been 1 critique that's come in so come on everyone! Critique to help your fellow writers! And, don't be afraid to send yours in. I'm waiting happily to put yours up here, too!


RendezvousRendezvous
1.A meeting with somebody.
Par excellence. A place for us. Us being me and you, or me and me.
Our meeting point makes the time apart bearable. The time seems to go so quick, but I wouldn't have it another way, just one day a week that lasts only four hours.
I hold your hand as we approach; I hear your weekly voice, and I'm filled with passion.
Our meeting place is in the mind, our meeting place is in the heart, our meeting place is something to repeat.
No work of art can explain a meeting place, no painting or poster.
We've reached our usual spot, and before you know it we part till next week.
Simple, and easy. Why make my place, our place, your place, complicated.
Vis-à-vis.
Rendezvous
2. A place arranged for this

Rendezvous by Nicklore
This is a short piece I wrote for my friend. Its about a meeting place between however many people on a regular basis and what the narrator feels about this place.

Shadows - Chapter 4    They had walked in silence for hours, barely looking at one another. Ashe occasionally walked far ahead or behind, with his hand on resting on the hilt of his sword. Every half hour or so he would leave the trail for a while, scouting he said, when Marie finally asked. Lostherrin looked no less wary, but focused on leading the pack-horse through the wooded trail. Luckily, there had been less snow than usual, making the trails not too hard to walk.
    Lee and Marie walked alongside Lostherrin, and eventually Lee decided to make the most of the time. "So what's it like? Naifalla, I mean. That's where we're headed, so I'd like to know a bit about it before we get there."
    Lostherrin smiled, "It is the most beautiful place. The Marshes themselves are full of wonderful and dangerous plants and animals, but the city... Naifalla is built on the south-east edge of the Marshes, where they meet a large lake and a large range of

Shadows - Chapter 4 by WhoisAenna
This is the most recent chapter in a fairly long story I am in the process of writing. I would really appreciate any critique on this chapter, especially on the dialogue (including markers) and the description of the fight scene. Any general advice would also be appreciated, as I can apply it to any further chapters. Thanks in advance!


Community Critics Showcase


The following deviants have presented the best critiques in past features of Community Critics. The most recent critique is shown in excerpt form. The links to the full critiques are provided. Take this opportunity to read over the showcase to get a better idea of how you can critique prose constructively.


comments.deviantart.com/1/8538… ---Rendezvous by ~Nicklore

"I like this piece; in my eyes it is sitting on the edge of poignant. The idea behind the piece is excellent, although the prose is merely good.

Your use of the definitions to bracket the piece is a very effective structural device. There is some lovely poetic language, like 'weekly voice', too. These are excellent, but the prose itself is more mundane."

---To read more, please see the above link. ^.^


I read through both stories and found that another person had left a comment. I DO NOT have a link to that specific comment ^^;

"As in previous chapters, my main comment to make is that I'd really love more description. You've created a rich world here, but I'd love to see it. Paint my mind a picture of the trail they walk down. What's the weather like and how does that reflect the mood of the travellers? It's always great if details do "double-duty"."

---To read more, please go to the author's story and read down. ^-^


whoisaenna.deviantart.com/art/…

"Very interesting so far, I'll be looking at the other chapters when I get a chance. As far as I could catch, your grammar was pretty good for the most part. Keep up the writing and I hope this helps!"

*Please read and look for both mizuyo and MetalMagpie's comments.

Upcoming Submissions

The following members are waiting to have their pieces submitted. If you want to see your name here, please follow the submission rules and guidelines above.



Section Coordinator: :iconmidnight-eclipses: :iconmandyrobin:





ProsePlease is proud to announce the release of a new contest open to all members of DeviantArt:

:bulletpurple: :bulletorange: :bulletred: The Creative Nonfiction Contest! :bulletred: :bulletorange: :bulletpurple:


The purpose of this contest is to promote the writing of real and worthwhile nonfiction on DeviantArt, and to encourage deviants to continue practicing this form in the future. In order to write nonfiction, however, it's important that you first understand what nonfiction is all about, and it may not be what you first thought. Read The Truth About Nonfiction to find out more.

At this point, you may be thinking, "Oh boy. I write essays all the time for school; I don't want to write an essay in my free time!" That's good, because we don't want everyday, run-of-the-mill, academic essays. Those essays are great for an organized environment like school, with their cooking-cutter form and spoon-fed theses. What ProsePlease wants are creative essays, which are entirely different.

In academic essays, the reader learns factual information about another person, another time period, or a specific event in a way that is generally detached from the reader. Creative essays, because of their unique blend of artistic elements and personal experience, teach readers about life and about themselves from the unique perspective of the writer. If the creative nonfiction writer hasn't reached the reader in a personal way, they have not accomplished their task.

Similarly, a creative essay is not only about relating the facts of an individual's life: it's about gaining some kind of perspective on those experiences. Too many people write rants, mistaking this outpouring of emotion for literature. Brenda Miller and Suzanne Paola, authors of Tell It Slant: Writing and Shaping Creative Nonfiction (a copy of which, coincidentally, is on the prize list), say: "Perspective defines the difference between a journal entry meant only for private venting and an essay designed for public consumption."

So, how should you approach nonfiction? Sideways! Miller and Paola point to a sort of peripheral vision that can guide you in the telling of your real life stories: "This peripheral vision--this ability to sidle up to the big issues by way of a side route--is the mark of an accomplished writer, one who has gained enough perspective to use personal experience in the service of a larger literary purpose." Creative essays are more than just a beginning, middle, and end centering on a single issue; they are more than an emotional rant about the unfairness of life; they use seemingly unrelated anecdotes and plenty of imagery to present a theme that packs a powerful punch!

Ok, so let's get on with. What about this contest?

To level the playing field a little, this contest has a theme. Since it begins today, September 1st, and will be completed by mid-December, we ask that your essay be inspired by one of the September to December holidays. It can be any special occasion that falls in one of those four months, including New Year's Eve, Christmas, Hanukkah, Thanksgiving, Halloween, Veterans/Rememberance Day, as well as birthdays, and any other personal or religious holiday you observe during those months in any year of your life.

We do not, however, want you to just tell us what happened: we want you to give us some perspective. Why was that event so important to you? What significance does/did it bear on your life? What insight does it offer into the lives of your readers? Try to use thematic elements, like symbolism, metaphor, and irony, for example, to make your essay pop.

Most creative nonfiction writers use several seemingly unconnected anecdotes and musings to compile their essay, but critical readers can see the same theme running through each paragraph. That is the kind of creative essay writing we're looking for. Don't just tell us, for example, about last Thanksgiving from beginning to end. Use the holiday as your inspiration, but draw more inspiration from other areas of your life as well.

Rules:

:bulletred: Your essay must be a work of nonfiction, not deliberately misleading or obviously fictionalized in any way.
:bulletred: Your entry must be received no earlier than October 1, 2009, so take your time editing, and no later than November 15, 2009 (based on EST time zone).
:bulletred: You may submit only one entry.
:bulletred: Your essay will be subject to pre-screening, to ensure it fits the genre and the theme of this contest. Any obvious deviations from the rules will be disqualified, but you may resubmit an edited or brand new essay thereafter, as long as you meet the deadline.
:bulletred: Plagiarism of any kind will not be tolerated.


Judges:

:iconatrue::iconmode-de-vie::iconmusicalgenius321::iconlefting::icontetemeko:

Prizes:

:bulletpurple: 1st Place:

- a copy of Tell It Slant: Writing and Shaping Creative Nonfiction by Brenda Miller & Suzanne Paola, donated by ATrue
- a 6-month sub from Community Relations
- a hoodie of your choice from Community Relations
- journal features from ATrue, mode-de-vie, Lefting, and Book-Reviews.

:bulletorange: 2nd Place:

- a 3-month sub from Community Relations
- a t-shirt of your choice from Community Relations
- journal features from ATrue, mode-de-vie, Lefting, and Book-Reviews

:bulletred: 3rd Place:

- a 1-month sub from Community Relations
- a button of your choice from Community Relations
- journal features from ATrue, mode-de-vie, Lefting, and Book-Reviews.

We'd love to be able to offer even more prizes, so, if you have anything to offer (including journal features), please contact ProsePlease by note.

We would like to stress that it is extremely important to read all the contest details and rules to ensure you understand our expectations. Failure to do so could result in disqualification from the contest (unfortunately, it does happen). All we ask is that you read this news article in full, please!
ProsePlease is back! After an unexpectedly long hiatus, the club is under new management and has a bright, successful future ahead. The new General Admin, ATrue, is the same woman that revived PoetryPlease two years ago. She hopes to have the same success here.


First thing's first, we need reliable staff members to help keep us up and running. Here are some of the positions that are being filled at the moment:

:bulletpurple: ProsePrompt Admin - We need an admin for the ProsePrompts, who can conceive a new prompt idea every month, post and read the entries, and select one of those entries to feature. We may select a second person to share in this duty.

:bulletpurple: Community Critics - We need someone to back up Mandyrobin at Community Critics. Responsibilities will include selecting submissions, reading critiques, and selecting one to showcase.

:bulletpurple: Contest Admin - We need one or two people to organize and run contests, market them, and put together judging panels and/or tally votes as needed. Contests will be run every few months.

If you'd like to apply for any of these positions, please send us a note expressing your interest and briefly outlining your qualifications. Some things you could mention include: previous leadership experience, your current involvement on dA, your writing experience, and/or your personal availability that will allow you to devote yourself to the club.


In other news:

We have a new prompt for April. Give it a try!


Also, stay tuned for:

:bulletpurple: An all-new nonfiction section
:bulletpurple: A ProsePlease only contest
:bulletpurple: An official sister club kick-off contest joint with PoetryPlease
:bulletred:Judge's Pick!:bulletred:

May's ProsePrompt had a decent turn out, with some great unconvential fairytales to read. Whether you want a blast back your childhood or new take on things with a twist - check them out, especially this month's Judge's Pick: Arman and the Flaming Dragon by JinShiranai

Also, if you like to make a suggestion for next month's Prompt, by all means tell us! If we think it's good enough, your's could very well be picked!

What is a ProsePrompt?

ProsePrompts are a series of exercises designed to jolt your creative writing processes. We present a concept and it's up to you to write and accomplish the idea. Your prose can be written in any format, genre and length. Also, ProsePrompts are not just open to ProsePlease members but also to the general public.

What are the rules?

The Golden Rule: All work must be your original creation. Plagiarism of any form will NOT be tolerated.


1. New Prompts are added every month and remain open for future submissions. Prompts never end nor close.

2. Your submission must include only the elements and requirements of the Prompt that you are submitting to. There is no need to satisfy past or future prompts however, creativity is encouraged, but feel free to still do them if you like.

3. At the beginning of every month, the Section Co-Ordinator will select a submission for Honorable Mentions from any of the prompts listed.

4. You may submit more than one entry per ProsePrompt and enter as many ProsePrompts as you like.

5. ProsePrompts are open to everyone, not just ProsePlease members

6. HAVE FUN!


What's the prize?

How about that warm and fuzzy feeling you get from accomplishing a challenge? No? Ok how about:

After the Prompt ends, the Section Coordinator will select an Honorable Mention based on which submission best satisfied the Prompt. This person will be featured on the front page of the following ProsePlease journal and also get a permanent spot under the prompt on the ProsePrompt page.

But that's not all, even if you didn't snag an Honorable Mention spot, our Section Coordinator will also feature a few participants on her journal. Now isn't that exciting? On to the prompt...

June ProsePrompt

What family is ever complete without the outsider, the black sheep of the family, the one who doesn't fit in with the rest of them? Every family has one. Sometimes it's good, sometimes it's bad. Writing from the side of your choice (misfit or family member), write a short story showing their perspective on the situation.

Not sure how finish?

Head on over to the ProsePrompt Archive and check out previous submissions, or, check in chat to share and receive some advice!

HOW DO I SUBMIT MY STORY?

Note the club with "[Month] ProsePrompt Submission" as the subject and a LINK to the work. It's that easy!

Every submission will be read and commented on by the Section Coordinator so feel free to write your heart out.

Good luck!
:bulletred:Judge's Pick!:bulletred:

While the turn out for April's ProsePrompt didn't receieve any enteries, there's no time to waste getting started on this month.

Also, if you like to make a suggestion for next month's Prompt, by all means tell us! If we think it's good enough, your's could very well be picked!

What is a ProsePrompt?

ProsePrompts are a series of exercises designed to jolt your creative writing processes. We present a concept and it's up to you to write and accomplish the idea. Your prose can be written in any format, genre and length. Also, ProsePrompts are not just open to ProsePlease members but also to the general public.

What are the rules?

The Golden Rule: All work must be your original creation. Plagiarism of any form will NOT be tolerated.


1. New Prompts are added every month and remain open for future submissions. Prompts never end nor close.

2. Your submission must include only the elements and requirements of the Prompt that you are submitting to. There is no need to satisfy past or future prompts however, creativity is encouraged, but feel free to still do them if you like.

3. At the beginning of every month, the Section Co-Ordinator will select a submission for Honorable Mentions from any of the prompts listed.

4. You may submit more than one entry per ProsePrompt and enter as many ProsePrompts as you like.

5. ProsePrompts are open to everyone, not just ProsePlease members

6. HAVE FUN!


What's the prize?

How about that warm and fuzzy feeling you get from accomplishing a challenge? No? Ok how about:

After the Prompt ends, the Section Coordinator will select an Honorable Mention based on which submission best satisfied the Prompt. This person will be featured on the front page of the following ProsePlease journal and also get a permanent spot under the prompt on the ProsePrompt page.

But that's not all, even if you didn't snag an Honorable Mention spot, our Section Coordinator will also feature a few participants on her journal. Now isn't that exciting? On to the prompt...

May ProsePrompt

We all love fairytales for different reasons, but commonly everyone wants everything the happy ending, which is sometimes in contrast to reality. Write a short fairy tale where the princess does not live happily ever after.

Not sure how finish?

Head on over to the ProsePrompt Archive and check out previous submissions, or, check in chat to share and receive some advice!

HOW DO I SUBMIT MY STORY?

Note the club with "[Month] ProsePrompt Submission" as the subject and a LINK to the work. It's that easy!

Every submission will be read and commented on by the Section Coordinator so feel free to write your heart out.

Good luck!
Interview with conorschild

April’s Q&A kicks off with conorschild, (no joke!) a going on 3-year deviant, forum whore, and for the all intended educational purpose of this article, a writer.

How long have you been a writer, and what first got you started?

I don't think there's been any one thing that got me started as a writer. I've always loved books from an early and at primary school I enjoyed taking part in writing activities, but I don't think I started writing for my own enjoyment until I was around 13. That was around when i joined dA, I wrote mainly poetry then but I never felt it was very good. I branched out into prose eventually, but even so stopped writing completely for almost a year and a half. It wasn't until Beccalicious's 'Addiction' competition that I decided to give it a try again, and begun to fall back in love with writing.

Where and/or how do you find inspiration?

I find inspiration from a lot of other pieces of art: books, films, music, and all kinds of visual art. Some stuff comes from my life, of course, but if I just wrote about that I think people would find it very boring

What genre do you tend to choose when writing? What’s your ‘style’?

I don't read a lot of sci-fi or fantasy but I've noticed my recent stories and ideas have had those elements in them, which is kinda odd. I guess I just write stuff that's about normal human emotions but with extra-ordinary things happening to them. I try not to make the fantastical parts the main focus of the story. For instant in 'Reason in Madness' the main character hides the body of his victim inside a fake greek statue but I tried to make the story about the reasoning behind his actions, not what his actions were.

What is the best thing about being a writer?

You get to talk to hot girls like Squarix, duh.

Does writing take much effort and dedication?

For me it doesn't take much dedication as I'm only doing it as an amateur, but I can imagine for a person trying to make their work published (as I will sometime, hopefully =P) it definitely would. In terms of effort, though, definitely. Sometimes the best idea you have just doesn't translate easily onto paper, and it can take a lot of effort to continue working on a story that isn't going as well as you thought it would, and having faith in your abilities and putting the effort in is very important.

Do you write an entire piece before editing or do you go back and edit each paragraph as you write it? Which is better, in your opinion?

Often I'll write the whole piece before going back to edit, but if I've got a bit of writer's block than going back to edit an earlier paragraph can be really helpful. In my opinion, they're both as good as each other - but it can cause a problem if you edit something at the start and have to change the whole piece.

Do you write an entire piece before editing or do you go back and edit each paragraph as you write it? Which is better, in your opinion?

Often I'll write the whole piece before going back to edit, but if I've got a bit of writer's block then going back to edit an earlier paragraph can be really helpful. In my opinion, they're both as good as each other - but it can cause a problem if you edit something at the start and have to change the whole piece.

What do you find is the hardest thing about editing your own work?

I'm a big fan of lines that stand out from the rest of the piece, and puns. But sometimes these can ruin the flow of a paragraph or a piece as a whole, and it can be hard for me to tell myself that I need to get rid of it! Especially in pieces where there's a word count.

Do you tend to encounter "writer's block," And if so, how do you deal with it?

I do get it quite a lot, I generally solve it by taking a different approach to my writing - either changing the style, the type of story, the way I write piece, or reading some books to gain some inspiration.

Who are some of your favourite authors or poets, and what do you admire about their work?

In authors I like Anthony Burgess and Vladmir Nabokov, especially with their most famous works (A Clockwork Orange and Lolita) both because they have such a wit and clear love of the language and the fact they manage to make the read empthasise so resounding with the most morally despicable characters. I also like Irvine Welsh for similar reasons, and how unrepentant his characters are. I love his short stories in Glue and Ecstasy. I'm also a fan of Jeffery Eugenides' novel The Virgin Suicides. I love how he builds up the details of the surbanan town and the whole novel just swims over you. I think the way his tale of human tragedy contains elements of fantasy and humour but without ever becoming unrealistic. The scene where the street cleans off all the fish flies is probably my favourite scene in any book. A similar author I admire would be Jonathon Safran Foer. In poets I like E.E Cummings for the way he creates a sense of beauty from ridiculous phrases and Percy Shelley and TS Eliott because of their wealth of beautiful description.


What about some of your favourite writers here on Deviant Art?

Squarix, cuntsss, sonic-butterfly, Unch, amberlouie and cool4dude.

Does what you read inspire your own writing?

Yes. Often after I've read a book I'll find my writing has been influenced a lot by the author's style.

Would you like to see your works published in the future?

I certainly am going to try and pursue writing as a career choice but I'm aware that it's not the most certain of career paths. If not I think I'd like to go into teaching

Do you consider self-publishing, or sending out manuscripts to publishing companies to be the better option?

I think I'd prefer to send manuscripts to publishing companies, lulu et al can be good for self-publishing but I think to get your work out there you would need a bigger company with a better financial backing.

Do you have any advice or tips for other writers, especially beginners?

I think the best advice is just to read a lot of other people's work, and don't be afraid to take criticism of your work in order to better yourself.

Do you think that critiquing other people's works benefits your own writing?

I definitely think it does, looking out for mistakes in other people's works will often make you rethink your own writing.

And last, if you could sum up what being a writer is like for you, how would you describe it?

Awesome.
:bulletred:Judge's Pick!:bulletred:

while the turn out for March's ProsePrompt wasn't as great as the last two, there are still come pleasant reads by several authors. Definitely check them out, especially this month's Judge's Pick: I Am Become Death by Dagger13

Also, if you like to make a suggestion for next month's Prompt, by all means tell us! If we think it's good enough, your's could very well be picked!

What is a ProsePrompt?

ProsePrompts are a series of exercises designed to jolt your creative writing processes. We present a concept and it's up to you to write and accomplish the idea. Your prose can be written in any format, genre and length. Also, ProsePrompts are not just open to ProsePlease members but also to the general public.

What are the rules?

The Golden Rule: All work must be your original creation. Plagiarism of any form will NOT be tolerated.


1. New Prompts are added every month and remain open for future submissions. Prompts never end nor close.

2. Your submission must include only the elements and requirements of the Prompt that you are submitting to. There is no need to satisfy past or future prompts however, creativity is encouraged, but feel free to still do them if you like.

3. At the beginning of every month, the Section Co-Ordinator will select a submission for Honorable Mentions from any of the prompts listed.

4. You may submit more than one entry per ProsePrompt and enter as many ProsePrompts as you like.

5. ProsePrompts are open to everyone, not just ProsePlease members

6. HAVE FUN!


What's the prize?

How about that warm and fuzzy feeling you get from accomplishing a challenge? No? Ok how about:

After the Prompt ends, the Section Coordinator will select an Honorable Mention based on which submission best satisfied the Prompt. This person will be featured on the front page of the following ProsePlease journal and also get a permanent spot under the prompt on the ProsePrompt page.

But that's not all, even if you didn't snag an Honorable Mention spot, our Section Coordinator will also feature a few participants on her journal. Now isn't that exciting? On to the prompt...

March ProsePrompt

All stories are based around central conflict right? Write a story about an event that goes perfectly, but add in your anti-perfectionist character and see what happens next. Perhaps some comedy may come from this, but that's up to you, the writer.

Not sure how finish?

Head over to the ProsePrompt Archive and check out previous submissions, or, check in chat to share and receive some advice!

HOW DO I SUBMIT MY STORY?

Note the club with "[Month] ProsePrompt Submission" as the subject and a LINK to the work. It's that easy!

Every submission will be read and commented on by the Section Coordinator so feel free to write your heart out.

Good luck!
ProsePlease has recently launched its new section called Community Critics. This new facility has been created to foster skills of critique and sharing, tools invaluable to the writers of DeviantArt. Community Critique not only provides opportunities for prose to be critiqued, but it also rewards community participation. Each fortnight, the member who delivers the best critique earns the right to have one of their prose critiqued the following fortnight.

To celebrate Community Critics, ProsePlease will be holding a weekend of Live Critique in its !dAmn chatroom, #ProsePlease. This event will take place during the long Easter weekend, from Friday the 21st of March 12:00am (midnight) UTC to Sunday the 23rd of March 3:00am UTC. This event is open not just to ProsePlease members, but also to all writers of DeviantArt.

For help converting timezones, feel free to use: Time Zone Convertor.

The purpose of Live Critique is to familiarise all participants with the methods and means of critique, as well as to generate a sense of community. Sometimes, the best way to develop one's writing is to learn from our common faults and weaknesses. Only then can we give our writing the full attention it deserves and consequently, build our craft.

We invite all Prose (and even non-Prose!) Writers to attend. Don't forget to make yourself a cup of coffee/tea to nurture your bodies, as we nurture our minds!

Yours truly,
vampbabe and AxDude

On Behalf of ProsePlease.
:bulletred:Judge's Pick!:bulletred:

With the awesome turnout of February's ProsePrompt, it was difficult to select just one when so many of them were good. Unfortunately, as a Judge, I must to pick one and only one even though several of them deserve recognition. So while I will pick only one, why should that stop you, dear reader, from checking out the the others? Do it!

So, without any more wasted time, the pick for this month is <a href="doverangel13.deviantart.com/ar…>Dear Mama, It's All Ending by doverangel13! Read it!!!

What is a ProsePrompt?

ProsePrompts are a series of exercises designed to jolt your creative writing processes. We present a concept and it's up to you to write and accomplish the idea. Your prose can be written in any format, genre and length. Also, ProsePrompts are not just open to ProsePlease members but also to the general public.

What are the rules?

The Golden Rule: All work must be your original creation. Plagiarism of any form will NOT be tolerated.


1. New Prompts are added every month and remain open for future submissions. Prompts never end nor close.

2. Your submission must include only the elements and requirements of the Prompt that you are submitting to. There is no need to satisfy past or future prompts however, creativity is encouraged, but feel free to still do them if you like.

3. At the beginning of every month, the Section Co-Ordinator will select a submission for Honorable Mentions from any of the prompts listed.

4. You may submit more than one entry per ProsePrompt and enter as many ProsePrompts as you like.

5. ProsePrompts are open to everyone, not just ProsePlease members

6. HAVE FUN!


What's the prize?

How about that warm and fuzzy feeling you get from accomplishing a challenge? No? Ok how about:

After the Prompt ends, the Section Coordinator will select an Honorable Mention based on which submission best satisfied the Prompt. This person will be featured on the front page of the following ProsePlease journal and also get a permanent spot under the prompt on the ProsePrompt page.

But that's not all, even if you didn't snag an Honorable Mention spot, our Section Coordinator will also feature a few participants on her journal. Now isn't that exciting? On to the prompt...

March ProsePrompt

Fact: All life ends in death... but why should that stop writers? Write a short story where death ends in life.

Not sure how finish?

Head on over to the ProsePrompt Archive and check out previous submissions, or, check in chat to share and receive some advice!

HOW DO I SUBMIT MY STORY?

Note the club with "[Month] ProsePrompt Submission" as the subject and a LINK to the work. It's that easy!

Every submission will be read and commented on by the Section Coordinator so feel free to write your heart out.

Good luck!
:new: The 2008 Ink Session has been rescheduled to the 1st of March, Saturday 12:00am UTC! Please take note and mark this on your calendars.

It's been a long time coming but Ink Sessions are back! These online workshops, held in the #InkSessions Chatroom, is organised by ProsePlease. For those of you new to the Sessions, they are a series of informal activities to encourage the meeting of writers and more importantly, literature-based discussion and development. All Ink Sessions are logged to provide a transcript for anyone unable to make it.


Topic: "Writing - A Natural Experience."

Many developing writers (and well practised writers!) often find it very difficult to bring realism into their writing. Without doubt, there are many degrees of realism which aren't just limited to genre. Writers must consider the authenticity of their characters' portrayal, dialogue and story setting. This particular workshop not only focuses on these issues but more importantly, the varying levels of realism in writing style. There will also be particular emphasis on how to balance creativity (or surreal ideas) with enough plausibility to make your story work. So if you're a writer struggling with the concept of realism or lacking depth in your writing, this is the workshop for you!


Ink Session Details

**Note: Due to frequent confusion with different time zones, we are now using UTC (Universal Coordinated Time) instead of EST time. Hopefully, this will reduce the confusion with daylight savings. For help converting your timezone to UTC, please visit [link] OR see [link] to see what the current times of cities around the world compared to the current UTC.**

      
    WHEN: 1st of March, Saturday at UTC 12:00am (midnight)       WHERE: #InkSessions Chatroom       WHO: All members, non-members and other respected guests.       TOPIC: "Writing - A Natural Experience"       INKLEADERS: *vampbabe and *AxDude





Activities

:bulletblue: 1# Brainstorm--> Participants will be asked a series of open & individual questions to establish our current ideas of what is "realistic or natural" writing. This activity is designed to encourage conversation and exchange of ideas.

:bulletblue: 2# Authentic Voice Mini Debate--> We will examine how an "Authentic Voice" can add value and dimension to writing. In this activity, participants will be randomly grouped into pairs. Each set of pairs will be presented with a statement which either accords or doesn't support "Authentic Voice". We will then invite the two paired writers to have a mini-debate (limited to 1 posts each). The debate will be somewhat differently as there is no forced Pro or Con stance. The winner (as decided by the votes of the other participants) is the writer which best conveys understanding or extension of the statement, whether they agree or disagree with the statement.

:bulletblue: 3# Case Study--> Two examples of excellent writing will be reviewed to investigate how the author balanced realism with effective writing. Participants will be invited to comment on style and techniques in the writing and pick out important pointers which we could apply to our own future projects. This particular activity will focus upon balance of realism against creative writing.

:bulletblue: FAQ and more!



More about Ink Sessions:

How does a session work?
An Ink Session is usually lead by an InkLeader, who selects the topic of the day and the activities to explore the topic. It is set in the chatroom #InkSessions and run as a live workshop. The InkLeader will answer any questions you have and offer directions as to how the activities will work.

What if I can only make it for the beginning, middle or end?
Doesn't matter. Just rock up when you can and join in. It is preferable however that you stay for at least 30mins to 1 hour, as some activities need a bit of your time and attention.

What if I can't make it at all?
No problem. We keep logs of all InkSessions. :thumbsup:

Can I chat normally during the Ink Session?
Big No No. Please direct all non-related chat to #ProsePlease.

What if I have an idea for an Ink Session or want to lead one myself?
Please note all interests to the club, with "InkSession" in the subject area. Once your idea is OKayed by the Ink Session coordinator (*vampbabe), you can set the time and topic and off you go.
It's been a long time coming but Ink Sessions are back! These online workshops, held in the #InkSessions Chatroom, is organised by ProsePlease. For those of you new to the Sessions, they are a series of informal activities to encourage the meeting of writers and more importantly, literature-based discussion and development. All Ink Sessions are logged to provide a transcript for anyone unable to make it.


Topic: "Writing - A Natural Experience."

Many developing writers (and well practised writers!) often find it very difficult to bring realism into their writing. Without doubt, there are many degrees of realism which aren't just limited to genre. Writers must consider the authenticity of their characters' portrayal, dialogue and story setting. This particular workshop not only focuses on these issues but more importantly, the varying levels of realism in writing style. There will also be particular emphasis on how to balance creativity (or surreal ideas) with enough plausibility to make your story work. So if you're a writer struggling with the concept of realism or lacking depth in your writing, this is the workshop for you!


Ink Session Details

**Note: Due to frequent confusion with different time zones, we are now using UTC instead of EST time. Hopefully, this will reduce the confusion with daylight savings. For help converting your timezone to UTC, please visit www.timezoneconverter.com/cgi-… OR see www.timeanddate.com/worldclock… to see what the current times of cities around the world compared to the current UTC.**

    WHEN: 24th of February, Sunday at UTC 12:00am (midnight) WHERE: #InkSessions Chatroom WHO: All members, non-members and other respected guests. TOPIC: "Writing - A Natural Experience" INKLEADERS: vampbabe and AxDude



Activities

:bulletblue: 1# Brainstorm--> Participants will be asked a series of open & individual questions to establish our current ideas of what is "realistic or natural" writing.  This activity is designed to encourage conversation and exchange of ideas.

:bulletblue: 2# Authentic Voice Mini Debate--> We will examine how an "Authentic Voice" can add value and dimension to writing. In this activity, participants will be randomly grouped into pairs. Each set of pairs will be presented with a statement which either accords or doesn't support "Authentic Voice". We will then invite the two paired writers to have a mini-debate (limited to 1 posts each). The debate will be somewhat differently as there is no forced Pro or Con stance. The winner (as decided by the votes of the other participants) is the writer which best conveys understanding or extension of the statement, whether they agree or disagree with the statement.

:bulletblue: 3# Case Study--> Two examples of excellent writing will be reviewed to investigate how the author balanced realism with effective writing. Participants will be invited to comment on style and techniques in the writing and pick out important pointers which we could apply to our own future projects. This particular activity will focus upon balance of realism against creative writing.

:bulletblue: FAQ and more!



More about Ink Sessions:

How does a session work?
An Ink Session is usually lead by an InkLeader, who selects the topic of the day and the activities to explore the topic. It is set in the chatroom #InkSessions and run as a live workshop. The InkLeader will answer any questions you have and offer directions as to how the activities will work.

What if I can only make it for the beginning, middle or end?
Doesn't matter. Just rock up when you can and join in. It is preferable however that you stay for at least 30mins to 1 hour, as some activities need a bit of your time and attention.

What if I can't make it at all?
No problem. We keep logs of all InkSessions. :thumbsup:

Can I chat normally during the Ink Session?
Big No No. Please direct all non-related chat to #ProsePlease.

What if I have an idea for an Ink Session or want to lead one myself?
Please note all interests to the club, with "InkSession" in the subject area. Once your idea is OKayed by the Ink Session coordinator (vampbabe), you can set the time and topic and off you go.
While the Jan/Feb ProsePrompt has finally concluded, February's is showing off muscle with three entries already! What are the rest of you waiting for? Write!

What is a ProsePrompt?

ProsePrompts are a series of exercises designed to jolt your creative writing processes. We present a concept and it's up to you to write and accomplish the idea. Your prose can be written in any format, genre and length. Also, ProsePrompts are not just open to ProsePlease members but also to the general public.

What are the rules?

The Golden Rule: All work must be your original creation. Plagiarism of any form will NOT be tolerated.


1. New Prompts are added every month and remain open for future submissions. Prompts never end nor close.

2. Your submission must include only the elements and requirements of the Prompt that you are submitting to. There is no need to satisfy past or future prompts however, creativity is encouraged, but feel free to still do them if you like.

3. At the beginning of every month, the Section Co-Ordinator will select a submission for Honorable Mentions from any of the prompts listed.

4. You may submit more than one entry per ProsePrompt and enter as many ProsePrompts as you like.

5. ProsePrompts are open to everyone, not just ProsePlease members

6. HAVE FUN!


What's the prize?

How about that warm and fuzzy feeling you get from accomplishing a challenge? No? Ok how about:

After the Prompt ends, the Section Coordinator will select an Honorable Mention based on which submission best satisfied the Prompt. This person will be featured on the front page of the following ProsePlease journal and also get a permanent spot under the prompt on the ProsePrompt page.

But that's not all, even if you didn't snag an Honorable Mention spot, our Section Coordinator will also feature a few participants on her journal. Now isn't that exciting? On to the prompt...

February ProsePrompt

Did the cities turn to ash or did the world decay by plague? Heck, does it even matter to your character any more? Write the final journal entry of a person who is witnessing or has witnessed the end of the world.

Not sure how finish?

Head on over to the ProsePrompt Archive and check out previous submissions, or, check in chat to share and receive some advice!

HOW DO I SUBMIT MY STORY?

Note the club with "[Month] ProsePrompt Submission" as the subject and a LINK to the work. It's that easy!

Every submission will be read and commented on by the Section Coordinator so feel free to write your heart out.

Good luck!
Interview with lovetodeviate

This month’s ProsePlease Q&A features Aditi, better known to the literature community as lovetodeviate. A deviant since late 2004, Aditi has been a stand out in the literature community, pushing critique, and organising projects like Writers-Workshop and ‘Advice for a Young Writer.’




How long have you been a writer, and what first got you started?

I used to say that I started writing in the ninth grade when I was asked to write an essay and substantiate with quotes: I was too lazy to research, so I made up a poem and attributed it to some nondescript name, and my teacher bought it. That’s the semi-interesting story I like telling people, but truthfully, I started writing much before that. I distinctly remember a story about two ants who defeated a giant, and another one about a girl who wanted to become a fairy. Since it was a long time back (twelve or thirteen years ago), I can’t tell what got me writing, but whatever it was, I’m happy that it happened.

Where and/or how do you find inspiration?

I don’t like the word “inspiration”, though I’m forced to use it sometimes. It sounds a bit fluffy to me. Stand-up comedians look for “material” – that’s the word they use. I know I can’t be funny, but hell, I’m an artist too, and I need “material”, not “inspiration”. This material could be in the form of images, something I read recently, an interesting incident, or just something I imagined.

What genre do you tend to choose when writing? What’s your ‘style’?

No idea absolutely. I write more poetry than prose, but I love them both. You would be more interested in prose, so I’ll talk about that.

I’ve never really fit into any category, the reason being that I’m unaware of many of the conventions that make up a particular genre. I did start out writing some fantasy and horror, and even a couple of pseudo-intellectual essays, but they didn’t work for me. Now I write about specific characters and how they think of the world, often reducing the importance of plot and dialogue (which I suck at).

I love diary writing – it is something that is underrated, I feel, both in literature classrooms as well as in the publishing industry. You usually only get to read the diaries of people who have already become famous. To me, writing in a diary, and refining the words that get written there, is an important exercise for writers (published or not), so it’s something I do regularly.

What is the most satisfying thing about being a writer?

When I read something I’ve written and edited several times over, and know that it’s pretty much there, that I wouldn’t change much about it, that gives me satisfaction. It’s also nice to be complimented, but genuinely. Seeing my work published gives me a high, too.

Does writing take much effort and dedication?

Yes. People mistakenly think that writing depends merely on talent or genius. Sure, there is something in you that compels you to choose aesthetic ways of expressing yourself, but that has to be honed. You can’t craft a beautiful chair unless you train yourself to be a good craftsman.

Do you write an entire piece before editing or do you go back and edit each paragraph as you write it? Which is better, in your opinion?

I usually write the entire piece before editing, but I can’t say that it’s superior to any other method. I suppose that if you’re not sure, you should experiment with various methods to find which is most suitable to your own style.

What do you find is the hardest thing about editing your own work?

Lack of judgement. It used to be emotional attachment to anything recently written, but now it is simply the inability to decide whether something is good or not. I don’t trust myself until I’ve grown a few months older, at least, to tell whether something is working or not.

Do you tend to encounter "writer's block," And if so, how do you deal with it?

Not really. It’s a psychological rather than a spiritual condition, and therefore easier to deal with. It’s a question of motivating yourself to write, of consciously searching for material when you find yourself idling. I think reading helps, too. Always have a book with you. That’s a little preachy, I apologise, but worth trying anyway.

Who are some of your favourite authors or poets, and what do you admire about their work?

I like William Blake; I find his poems taut and sonically beautiful. TS Eliot is wonderful, even when he’s incomprehensible. A few others I like are Ted Hughes, Sylvia Plath (some of her work, at least), Ted Kooser and Michael Ondaatje. I enjoy prose poetry by Arthur Rimbaud and Charles Baudelaire. Vikram Seth’s The Golden Gate (a novel in verse) is to die for.

I’ve begun to like Russian literature a lot:

Gogol, Dostoevsky and Chekhov are favourites. I like reading Virginia Woolf; she’s very entertaining if you forget all the hype surrounding her. I adore Italo Calvino’s work; he renovated the novel, in my opinion. Douglas Adams and Terry Pratchett – gods! Albert Camus and Boris Vian are my favourite French writers. Tagore wrote about human beings, which is a delicious change from what so many other Indian writers have done. JD Salinger is my favourite American writer. This is going to be endless, so I’ll just list a few others: Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Kazuo Ishiguro, Franz Kafka, Mahasweta Devi, Marjane Satrapi, JM Coetzee, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and that’s it for now.

What about some of your favourite writers here on Deviant Art?

I’m already afraid that I’m going to miss someone out, but here goes: I love reading *wordworks - her prose is always beautifully crafted. ~barnabus writes fantastic plays. There is something very attractive about *apocathary’s style. I recently began re-reading `GunShyMartyr’s work, and am enjoying myself immensely. `GeneratingHype is another favourite.

Among the poets, I would say:
*Adeimantus,
`PoeticWar,
*salshep,
*venturus,
~LazyLinePainterJohn,
~manchaliaina,
~TheHungerArtist,
*fllnthblnk.
=MSJames,
`AbCat  and
=Keraness

are my favourite haiku poets.

*Negated and *Amberlouie are extremely talented writers as well. My most recent favourite is *tightwhitepants - he can make me laugh in an instant.

Does what you read inspire your own writing?

Sure, I get a lot of material from reading. I have to be careful about it, though: after the first time I read Virginia Woolf, I started using semicolons shamelessly. I had to remind myself that I wasn’t Virginia Woolf and never would be.

What do you find yourself learning when you read others’ work?

Craft. After a while, I stopped reading just for the story or the pretty words; now I like thinking about why I instantaneously liked something, and after some thought I discover how beautifully a metaphor has been used, or how well stream-of-consciousness has been woven into a third person narrative, and that’s when I learn how to do something new. It makes me eager to try new things.

Do you consider writing as a possible career for yourself? If not, what do you plan to do?

I will always write and I will always try to get published, but to not have any other plans is irresponsible. It’s not easy to make it big. I’m studying literature, media and psychology currently. Eventually I think I’ll teach, which will pay me nothing; I’m so convinced that I will die tragically poor that I’m actually optimistic about it.

Would you like to see your works published in the future?

Oh yes! I already have some poetry published, but it would be great to see my prose in print as well.

Do you consider self-publishing, or sending out manuscripts to publishing companies to be the better option?

To be boring, it’s an individual choice. I would send my work to an agent, if I wanted to make it big. Self-publishing is a good option, too, but you have to think about it carefully. If you want to self-publish a book for friends and family, and maybe the random stranger, then it doesn’t matter what you publish. But if you plan to self-publish rubbish and expect to make it big, then you’re in for a lot of disappointment. Even good self-published writing disappears into oblivion because of the kind of marketing that’s required. `alienhead is an example of a good writer who has self-published after establishing himself in the internet writing world. I admire the work he’s put into his website. He’s probably the best person on deviantART to ask about self-publishing.

Do you have any advice or tips for other writers, especially beginners?

I feel presumptuous giving advice, but anyway: I think it’s important to throw away your ego without losing yourself, your own ideas and opinions, in the process. Be humble, but don’t be self-deprecatory. It’s a fine line, and I know I tread it very often. Humility will come from two things: one is reading; the other is critiquing. Reading will show you how hard it is to compete with centuries of excellent writing. Critiquing will show you that you can’t get it right every time, and that no matter how talented you are, how deep-seated your urge to write is, you have to work hard at honing your skills.

Can you recommend us any good writing resources out there on the Internet?

Oh yes. At *Writers-Workshop, we’ve been working on collecting writing resources and have come up with a pretty comprehensive list thanks to the contributions of many: [link] The first half features resources on deviantART, and the second half features articles at other sites.

What’s the deal with this critique stuff? Why do you do it, and how is it beneficial?

Heh, I get the feeling that whenever people read “lovetodeviate”, they think, “critique”, because I’ve been harping on its importance for the past few months.

It’s obvious enough why it’s useful to receive critique, so I won’t go there. Critiquing other people’s work is beneficial because you start thinking critically. The biggest challenge you face as a young writer is probably the inability to think in a critical mode; once you get there through reading other people’s writing, you’ll start noticing flaws in your own writing. You won’t be as defensive as you used to be; you will be willing to not just edit, but to rewrite something from scratch if it isn’t working.

I also think critiquing is fun. It’s not dreary, as some people like to think. When you critique, you’re essentially interpreting texts and discovering new meanings. It’s a creative exercise.

Do you encourage people to critique their own writing before they show others their work?

Hmm, I’m not sure what you mean. It’s definitely important to proofread your work before you post it anywhere. I’ve also learnt that you should wait. If you just wrote something, your judgement of it will be clouded for a few days at least. Keep it safe for a while, come back to it, read it carefully, correct any flaws you notice, and then show it to everyone, if you think still think it’s worth it.

And last, if you could sum up what being a writer is like for you, how would you describe it?

Wow, that’s a hard one. So far, I’ve realised that writing allows me to say things that I would ordinarily never say. It’s easy to couch meaning, to use symbols and metaphors and fiction to avoid admitting the truth. Being a writer means I get to live as comfortably as possible while never losing interest in the world around me.
What is a ProsePrompt?

ProsePrompts are a series of exercises designed to jolt your creative writing processes. We present a concept and it's up to you to write and accomplish the idea. Your prose can be written in any format, genre and length. Also, ProsePrompts are not just open to ProsePlease members but also to the general public.

What are the rules?

The Golden Rule: All work must be your original creation. Plagiarism of any form will NOT be tolerated.


   1. New Prompts are added every two months and remain open for future submissions. Prompts never end nor close.

   2. Your submission must include only the elements and requirements of the Prompt that you are submitting to. There is no need to satisfy past or future prompts however, creativity is encouraged, but feel free to still do them if you like.

   3. Every two-months, the Section Co-Ordinator will select a submission for Honorable Mentions from any of the prompts listed.

   4. You may submit more than one entry per ProsePrompt and enter as many ProsePrompts as you like.

   5. ProsePrompts are open to everyone, not just ProsePlease members

   6. HAVE FUN!


What's the prize?

How about...that warm and fuzzy feeling you get from accomplishing a challenge? No? Ok how about:

After the Prompt ends, the Section Coordinator will select an Honorable Mention based on which submission best satisfied the Prompt. This person will be featured on the front page of the following ProsePlease journal and also get a permanent spot under the prompt on the ProsePrompt page.

But that's not all, even if you didn't snag an Honorable Mention spot, our Section Coordinator will also feature a few participants on her journal. Now isn't that exciting? On to the prompt

January/February ProsePrompt

They say the first sentence should grab a reader's attention. Write a short story that starts with the following sentence, and then let your imagination play with what comes next.

"Oh my God... What have we/I done!"

Don't worry about it being singular or plural. Just make sure you are writing!

Not sure how finish?

Head on over to the ProsePrompt Archive and check out previous submissions, or, check in chat to share and receive some advice!

HOW DO I SUBMIT MY STORY?

Note the club with "[months] ProsePrompt Submission" as the subject and a LINK to the work. It's that easy!

Every submission will be read and commented on by the Section Coordinator so feel free to write your heart out.

Good luck!
It's time for a new ProsePrompt!  :dance:

Last month's prompt inspired hello-im-NICKK, passionatelyhated, PunkPygmiePuff and jimboistic to produce some amazing prose, which can be found featured on the prompt page of our journal. What are you waiting for? There are no limitations or deadlines, and its a great opportunity to gain positive feedback and exposure. Participation equals points so flex that gray matter ;)

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER PROMPT

Think of a body part, any body part. Does to move? Voluntarily or involuntarily? Can you live without it? Can it live without you? This is your main character. Write a story using the characteristics of the body part you chose (in any way you want) to develop your main character. e.g Kidneys can become twins...your big toe can become the oldest child in a family of ten.

Not quite sure how to tackle this one? Head on over to the ProsePrompt Archive and check out some other great prompts.

For our nonmembers out there, and those members that have forgotten :sherlock:

HOW DO I SUBMIT MY STORY?

Note the club with "(month) ProsePrompt Submission" and a LINK to the work. It's that easy!

Every submission will be read and commented on by the Section Coordinator so feel free to write your heart out.
ProsePrompt  is back after a much needed hiatus, and bursting with ideas designed to chisel away at even the most resilient writer's block!

It's still the same quality prompt you've come to expect from us here at ProsePlease but there's also a few new perks that we hope everyone can enjoy and benefit from.

For our nonmembers out there, and those members that have forgotten ;):

WHAT IS A PROPSEPROMPT?

ProsePrompts are a series of exercises designed to jolt your creative writing processes. We present a concept and it's up to you to write and accomplish the idea. Your prose can be written in any format, genre and length. Also, ProsePrompts are not just open to ProsePlease members but also to the general public.

WHAT ARE THE RULES?

The Golden Rule: All work must be your original creation. Plagiarism of any form will NOT be tolerated.
  1. New Prompts are added every two months and remain open for future submissions. Prompts never end nor close.
  2. Your submission must include only the elements and requirements of the Prompt that you are submitting to. There is no need to satisfy past or future prompts however, creativity is encouraged.
  3. Every two-months, the Section Co-Ordinator will select a submission for Honorable Mentions from any of the prompts listed.
  4. You may submit more than one entry per ProsePrompt and enter as many ProsePrompts as you like.
  5. ProsePrompts are open to everyone, not just ProsePlease members
  6. HAVE FUN!

WHAT'S THE PRIZE?

How about....that warm and fuzzy feeling you get from accomplishing a challenge? No? Ok how about:

After the Prompt ends, the Section Coordinator will select an Honorable Mention based on which submission best satisfied the Prompt. This person will be featured on the front page of the following ProsePlease journal and also get a permanent spot under the prompt on the ProsePrompt page.

But that's not all, even if you didn't snag an Honorable Mention spot, our Section Coordinator will also feature a few participants on her journal. Now isn't that exciting? On to the prompt

SEPTEMBER PROMPT

We're doing things a little different this month just to jumpstart our new initiative and get you guys to do a bit of introspection for this one month only prompt.

This time we're focusing on the theme of Identity using your (or someone else's) dA username as the prompt. The only rule is that it must be a valid dA account name and you must specify the username that inspired your piece in the description.

If your using someone else as your inspiration, let them know! Spread the love and maybe find out the real story behind the inspiration.

Not quite sure how to tackle this one? Head on over to the ProsePrompt Archive and check out previous submissions.

HOW DO I SUBMIT MY STORY?

Note the club with "(month) ProsePrompt Submission" and a LINK to the work. It's that easy!

Every submission will be read and commented on by the Section Coordinator so feel free to write your heart out.

:boogie: