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Staticgender (1)

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Staticgender: A gender which can best be described as TV static; fuzzy and incomprehensible.

Term coined by: Unknown
Designed by me.


All designs in this gallery are HQ and are free to use for anything pride-related! You can download the full size on the right sidebar. Do not hesitate to ask questions, submit new designs, or request combos, I'm happy to help!

Check out my FAQ here if you'd like to know more! There's links to masterlists of all the different genders/orientations I know of too!

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Austomi-stories's avatar
er, wha? i'm confused
gender is basically appearance (from what i've heard and learned)
how could you be fuzzy and incomprehensible? making new genders are a bit confusing and i think it's best (imo) to just leave it at two, since being feminine or masculine are the only two ways you can take
-@/napboys
Pride-Flags's avatar
In a LGBTQIAPN+ context, gender or gender identity is the subjective and personal experience of a person with regards to the social categories of gender. Every known society has gender categories and expectations, which may be associated with certain physical sex characteristics; those categories may serve as bases for a personal gender identity that relates to the genders available in each society.

In a binary gender system, most people adhere to and reinforce ideals of “maleness” and “femaleness” in all aspects of sex and gender: physical sexual characteristics, gender identity and gender expression. In every society, there are people that don’t meet those standards, partly or wholly. Nowadays, people like this may identify as transgender (trans), genderqueer or nonbinary. People who identify with the gender they were assigned to at birth are usually categorized as cisgender (cis); or as ipsogender if they are intersex. A lot of societies have other kinds of gender systems.

This text isn’t meant to have an academic focus, but it’s interesting to note that, in an academic context, there is distinction between sex (anatomy) and gender, that may refer to the social roles that are assigned to each gender by society, or to a personal understanding of gender based on the person’s own perspective (gender identity). However, in day-to-day conversation, people often mix up “sex” and “gender” as if they were synonyms.

In essence, gender doesn’t depend on genitals or appearance, both present and desired, and it also isn’t necessary or immutable: people can be genderless or have fluid genders. The origins of personal gender identity aren’t clear, since there are so many things that may factor into it, however, no matter the origin, gender usually isn’t a personal choice, since it usually isn’t a conscious process.

There is also gender expression, which is how someone expresses their gender visually. People usually talk about masculine, feminine or androgynous presentation, but people may want to express their gender identities in all sorts of ways.

Gender identities may consist of lack of gender, presence of a “base” gender (which doesn’t necessarily has to do with binary genders or common gender descriptors), presence of various genders (one at a time or more than one at the same time), presence of one or more genders affected by cultural/neurological/biological factors, uncertainty about one’s own gender, weak/vague gender(s), and many other combinations.

This was translated and adapted from orientando.org/o-que-e-genero/; credit for the original text goes to queer-neko on Tumblr.

Basically, this means gender has to do with your social experience, and that may lead to people not knowing where they fit in, or not seeing themselves as masculine, feminine, male-like or female-like. Or they may see themselves as more than one of those.

Regardless of what you think, nonbinary people still exist, and will still define their genders in the manner we find more accurate, regardless of how binary people don't find it practical or whatever.

~ Tath
SoftVelvet's avatar
You are... so not looking at this from any view than your own. Your understanding of how you see yourself in your life is perfectly fine, but not everyone sees things like you do, or can feel as comfortable as you do in your gender.

If you honestly want to understand and want a better explanation, don't make assertive assumptions at other people and tell them that they are making things confusing for those of you who can only see two genders.

Obviously, these things are not designed with you in mind, nor are they here have you insult their artists. If you don't get it, if you don't like it... move on. Obviously there are a huge number of people who *do* identify and *get* what all these flags mean for them and others.

Waving your opinion around like you think it is a gold-covered dick that you need to share with everyone so they can agree with how lovely it is helps nobody, and gives no helpful critical points.