Deviation Actions

peet's avatar

Hurin of the Keys

By peet
145 Favourites
30 Comments
1K Views

'Is there no deed to do?' she said. 'Who commands in this City?' 
'I do not rightly know,' he answered. 'Such things are not my care. There is a marshal over the Riders of Rohan; and the Lord Húrin, I am told, commands the men of Gondor. But the Lord Faramir is by right the Steward of the City.' 

JRR Tolkien: The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King: Book VI,  Chapter 5: The Steward and the King

Previous:  The Battle of the Morannon by peet  Next:   The Houses of Healing by peet

Painted in watercolour.

If you appreciate my artwork, please show your support by taking a few short moments to 'Like' my :facebook: Facebook Page at Peter Xavier Price - Illustrator. Many thanks!

Image details
Image size
405x1000px 524.59 KB
Published:
© 2016 - 2021 peet
Comments30
Join the community to add your comment. Already a deviant? Log In
PandoraT's avatar
Beautiful. Although it is a profile is expressive.
peet's avatar
Expressiveness is very important to me, so I'm really glad you like indeed :)
roxya1's avatar
Very nice profile.
peet's avatar
Toraach's avatar
I like this portrait. Especially that you made that somewhat classical! I see that great little deail on his cloack, that meander. I always like to see more "ancient" stylization than medieval in Gondor and Numenor. Just like MatejCadil does it. Of course not totally the same as Romans and Greeks were, but inspired by them. Writing in fantasy some people as just transported into an another world cultures are quite boring in my opinnion. I like in Tolkien's works that he didn't like that. His cultures are original.
peet's avatar
Again, sincere thanks for the comment! I'm a big fan of MatejCadil's work, particularly his Kings of Gondor series (alongside his landscapes more generally) - he tackles the subject matter really well, and his attention to detail in architecture and costuming is second to none, and works perfectly in the Greco-Roman Byzantium style which I feel is particularly appropriate to the South Kingdom: though Tolkien also alludes to the Egypt, which is interesting - in any case it's definitely Mediterranean! Though of course never exactly like-for-like :)
Toraach's avatar
But Gondor isn't just Byzantium and Arnor isn't just a medieval settling with knights. Tolkien created much more original stuff, there isn't anything like in a cheap RPG settlings, where one country is medieval Germany which exists next to fairy tale like France, and a vampire country and a russian principality with bear-cavalry. In Middle Earth there aren't any simple connections, even Rohan despite similar names aren't just anglo-saxons, or goths. Only the Shire is the closest to old merry England, but that's more like a really big easter egg. 

For Egypt, I see two similarities, but none of them is a reason to paint them looking like some Amenhotep or other Ramses. 
1. Gigantic statues of Argonath.
2. A big royal necropolis. 

For Mediterranean, that's good. I somewhat like fanfictions, and in mine, the Gondorians eat olives, drink wine, and grapes are widely cultivated in their land :) 
Brunild's avatar
Very nice portrait, I really like this interpretation of the character: his features and expression, his noble bearing. Also beautiful as always are the details of the picture and your style. Great job!;)
peet's avatar
Apologies for the monstrously late reply Brunild! Always a Pleasure to read you like my style -- and nobility is definitely something that's important to me in Tolkien's world. It seeps through the pores of his writing! Hope you had a beautiful Christmas!
Brunild's avatar
Don't worry!!! I am very happy to leave comments on your beautiful works and talk with you everytime!
I hope you had a Beautiful Christmas  and I take the opportunity to wish you a wonderful happy new year too!! ;) :)
NdrN's avatar
Wonderful work!
peet's avatar
Thanks a lot, cheers! :beer:
TwiggyStone's avatar
This is so well done :heart:
peet's avatar
Really appreciate it TwiggyStone!
SarkaSkorpikova's avatar
Great depiction of this character! I really like the textures of background, clothes and especially hair. I often browse through your gallery and admire your way of paintig hair and this piece amazed me, because I've never seen similar technique anywhere else and it works well! :) 
peet's avatar
As always you're so very kind :) :) I'm still practicing my technique, and I find that it changes a lot depending on things like paper too. That's the awesome thing about watercolour, it keeps on surprising you with every single painting you tackle :nod:
SarkaSkorpikova's avatar
I'm kind because I hope to inherit some of your paintings in the future :D :giggle:
Watercolor is the best. And I also can't help myself but appreciate other watercolorists above all artists, because this medium is wonderful and looks the best and most evocative :) 
peet's avatar
Haha, keep up with the kindness and this may happen! :P Yes, examining other watercolourists is incredibly rewarding because the way they use it is very individualistic and unique :)
AlystraeaArt's avatar
Even from the thumbnail I was thinking Greek/Roman/Byzantine! I love the strength and dignity of his profile (there's something so virile and noble about many of your male figures, but this one in particular), and the colours (immediately made me think again of a Byzantine mural). And the drapes in that cloak are gorgeously rendered. Clap 
peet's avatar
Thank you so much! That's really kind what you say about how I portray Men in Tolkien's world. It comes across - I think - from the style of his writing itself, which is in such a noble vein and permeates throughout his creation. In any case, I thank you kindly! Byzantine seems to work for Gondor - the East and West Roman Empire is so similar to North and South Kingdom in M-e; in both cases, one degrades and the other endures :nod:
AlystraeaArt's avatar
I never saw that historical parallel before, but you are so right! Nod 
peet's avatar
'But in the north Arnor dwindles, is broken into petty princedoms, and finally vanishes. The remnant of the Númenóreans becomes a hidden wandering Folk, and though their true line of Kings of Isildur's heirs never fails this is known only in the House of Elrond. In the south Gondor rises to a peak of power, almost reflecting Númenor, and then fades slowly to decayed Middle Age, a kind of proud, venerable, but increasingly impotent Byzantium.'

- Letter 131, Tolkien to Milton Waldman, c. 1951 :)
AlystraeaArt's avatar
Oh, thank you so much for the reference - I never knew that Tolkien himself drew the parallel. There is so much in the letters (and the histories of ME) that I have never delved into! =P (Razz) 
peet's avatar
No worries! Yeh there's lots there, but I went on a huge binge not long after reading the main texts and some of it's stuck with me :D
Join the community to add your comment. Already a deviant? Log In