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Concavenator skeletal

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By palaeozoologist   |   
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A new, 6-meter long carcharodontosaur from the early Cretaceous of Spain (~130 million years ago (mya)), Concavenator corcovatus had unique spinal humps anterior and posterior to its sacrum. The function of these odd spinal elongations is currently unknown, although is the subject of much speculation. Hypothesized functions for these elongated spines include everything from storing fat deposits to thermal regulation to sexual display. Interestingly, the enigmatic theropod Becklespinax also has these humps (although somewhat less extreme in my opinion), and it has been suggested that these two genera may be congeneric.

Concavenator was also initially reported to have quill knobs on its ulna which would suggest it had feathers, however most paleontologists feel that they are likely something different, due to the fact that their position on the ulna is not similar to those in birds. It has been suggested that these "quill knobs" may actually be intermuscular lines by several commentators in blogs and on the Dinosaur Mailing List (the DML). Whatever the case, Concavenator is a fascinating theropod dinosaur.

Edit: I should point out that the white bones indicate recovered material that I could discern from published photos, whereas the grayed bones indicate the parts of bones that were not completely preserved or difficult to distinguish. Some parts of the vertebral column and appendicular elements that were not preserved are left black.
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Comments26
anonymous's avatar
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TheDubstepAddict's avatar
TheDubstepAddictHobbyist Traditional Artist
Needs beef
paleosir's avatar
paleosirHobbyist General Artist
I am sure this will prove helpful in future drawings!
It looks really nice and dynamic.
TheDubstepAddict's avatar
TheDubstepAddictHobbyist Traditional Artist
:4
TheDubstepAddict's avatar
TheDubstepAddictHobbyist Traditional Artist
:3*
TrilobiteCannibal's avatar
TrilobiteCannibalHobbyist Traditional Artist
fail
TheDubstepAddict's avatar
TheDubstepAddictHobbyist Traditional Artist
XD
TrilobiteCannibal's avatar
TrilobiteCannibalHobbyist Traditional Artist
I will find you, and I will point out your fails Aron 
TheDubstepAddict's avatar
TheDubstepAddictHobbyist Traditional Artist
Y IS SIS SU CUUT?
TrilobiteCannibal's avatar
TrilobiteCannibalHobbyist Traditional Artist
becuz Aron is bes Poke
TheDubstepAddict's avatar
TheDubstepAddictHobbyist Traditional Artist
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TheDubstepAddict's avatar
TheDubstepAddictHobbyist Traditional Artist
:lol:
TrilobiteCannibal's avatar
TrilobiteCannibalHobbyist Traditional Artist
=P (Razz) 
TheDubstepAddict's avatar
TheDubstepAddictHobbyist Traditional Artist
^^
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MarkM98's avatar
MarkM98Hobbyist General Artist
Just beautiful. Last year I made a in-life drowing of the animal based on your reconstruction. If I have your permission, I would like to upload it on my gallery. I would of course write your name and leave the link of this page in the description. Let me know if there are problems, and I'll not upload it. Thanks again for the amazing and accurate job.
palaeozoologist's avatar
palaeozoologistHobbyist General Artist
Thank you! Glad you like, and you may upload your life drawing. It would be awesome if you could link to this! Thanks again! :D [p.s. sorry for the delayed reply]
dinosapien's avatar
dinosapien General Artist
Quick question: How do you know whether or not the vertebrae aren't partially chopped off due to preservation? How can you tell if the vertebrae were just missing in the fossil record and it had some sort of fan-like thing on their backs like Suchomimus? Beautiful skeleton interpretation, by the way :)
palaeozoologist's avatar
palaeozoologistHobbyist General Artist
In general, the inside texture of the bone will be rougher than the outside texture of the bone, so it is usually fairly easy to tell whether a bone has been broken or not. If the bone has been chopped due to preservation, usually you can see fractures in the matrix in which the fossil was preserved.

In Concaventor, you can't really tell what is happening behind the hip bones because of the way the fossil is preserved. That said, there is no indication from the photos I've seen that the "dip" is a factor of preservation. It appears to be real.

I really should do a re-do of this skeletal, it was one of my first serious skeletal attempts. I'd do a ton of things differently, but thanks for the compliment anyways! :D
dinosapien's avatar
dinosapien General Artist
Np, and thanks :)
Algoroth's avatar
AlgorothProfessional General Artist
Pretty darned good, actually. And I think, IMO, you gave enough musculature to the legs. Nice drumstick!
DeinonychusEmpire's avatar
DeinonychusEmpireHobbyist General Artist
I can't believe I've only just stumbled on your humble abode now. You're work is fascinating! It seems as though every reconstruction of Concavenator gives the thing a different hump. I'm assuming you've studied the specimen for yourself, so is this as good of a skeletal as I'm going to get? I would like to reconstruct Concevenator, and am looking for a good reference.
palaeozoologist's avatar
palaeozoologistHobbyist General Artist
Well, this is based off of photos of the specimen, so the shape of the bones should be pretty accurate. However, I was working off of a low-res photo, so I might have missed some things or misinterpreted some other things. But I'd say proportionally it's pretty good.
Carcharodontotitan's avatar
The legs look like a chicken's.
palaeozoologist's avatar
palaeozoologistHobbyist General Artist
As do most theropods'...
Carcharodontotitan's avatar
Yeah but they look so wobbly and thin in this picture. And it is not like this theropod is only 2 feet long either, it should have thicker, stronger looking legs.
anonymous's avatar
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