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pagan-live-style's avatar

Rare Mignon typewriter Model 4 from 1926 by AEG 2

Rare Mignon typewriter Model 4 from 1926 made by AEG, taken with Pergear 25mm F1,8 lens at F5,6.

Mignon is a French word , meaning small and pretty or delicately pretty.

Mignon typewriter was patented in 1901 by AEG, difference it had no keyboard, and only one hammer to type the letter on paper. With the pointer you pointed the letter on the tablet the cylinder hammer slided forward and back, and rotated to the letter wanted to be typed. There are only 3 keys from left to right , "space" > "type letter" > "Backspace.

There were over the years,  26 different sets of "tablets" combined with the correct "Cylinder hammer" , depending on use of letter types and/or language, and it only took a minute to change the set.

The mignon was in production for 30 years and all together around 350.000 were produced, one could with practice type between 250 and 300 letters a minute.


see typewriter operated on video below


More background information:site.xavier.edu/polt/typewrite…

Bought at communal thrift shop, with original wooden casing and manual in German, for 50, -


hope you like it , greetz len.
Image details
Image size
6000x4000px 6.97 MB
Make
FUJIFILM
Model
X-E3
Shutter Speed
1/37 second
Aperture
F/1.0
Focal Length
50 mm
ISO Speed
800
Date Taken
Mar 9, 2021, 11:46:26 PM
Sensor Size
23mm
Published:
Comments5
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Tigles1Artistry's avatar

:omg: amazing dear Len....:clap:

bindii's avatar

Sometimes I wish I could turn time back. But otherwise I woudn't have seen this beauty! :)

pagan-live-style's avatar

its a view into the past!

33M's avatar

I can imagine myself typing on this a century ago...so cool looking

pagan-live-style's avatar

It is out of the box thinking, in order to invent this.

it was patented in the US on march 2th 1909. US914272.


Part of the tex of the patent:

"This invention relates to a typewriter having a typeroller but without a keyboard, which differs from known typewriters of the type referred to in that the adjustment or movement of the type as also the impression or printing of the same, requires only a very slight movement of the hand".