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Owlsarai

Folk Polymaticana from David
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Contemplative Me by Owlsarai, visual art

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Artist // Hobbyist
  • United States
  • Deviant for 1 year
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Albino Llama: Llamas are awesome! (77)
Quartz: It's a big honor to be awarded a Quartz badge! (6)
DeviantArt Tutorials: Participated in Tutorials Campaign
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My Bio

If our only purpose is to perceive, contemplate, and emerge through creative acts, we do well.


Welcome to Owlsarai. I'm David Nelson Blair, a boomer surrounded by drawing pencils, paints, books, shop tools, garden tools, musical and optical instruments. If you're thinking "second childhood," you might be on to something.


Owlsarai is one of the sharing platforms of my Foothills of Space Creative Workshop.

https://www.foscw.net


Favourite Visual Artist
Leonardo
Favourite Movies
The Arrival (2016), Ex Machina
Favourite Bands / Musical Artists
Bambi Wolf, R. Carlos Nakai, Ramin Djawadi
Favourite Books
Fiction--Kazuo Ishiguro, The Remains of the Day. Non-fiction--Richard Baum and William Sheehan, In Search of Planet Vulcan: The Ghost in Newton's Clockwork Universe
Favourite Writers
Arthur C. Clarke, David McCullough

On Selfies

0 min read
Will folks think you're vain if you indulge in self-portraiture? Perhaps, but you're in plenty of good company. I've stopped worrying about it, and today I established a Selfies folder on my DA gallery page. Enjoy! I tried my hand after recently taking in an exhibit visiting the Albuquerque Museum: Eye to I, a collection of Self Portraits from the National Portrait Gallery. There are of course multiple oceans of look-at-the-camera-and-say-cheese selfies on Facebook, and it's interesting to see how serious artists stand apart from that throng when they take on self portraits. They certainly do stand apart in an amazing variety of ways. What's your strategy? The website for the National Portrait Gallery exhibit is https://npg.si.edu/exhibition/eye-i-self-portraits There is a companion catalog (in the form a hard-cover book which I happily paid serious money for in the museum gift shop): Eye to I: Portraits from the National Portrait Gallery. Washington, D.C.: National Portrait
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A take-away from my creative session this morning is that second-tier photos are sometimes great reference photos. "Practicing Cranes," a page of ink-drawing practice that I posted today was helped along by a variety of photos that I've taken of sandhill cranes. Many were not standouts, but they gave variety to my doodles of the grand birds--particularly in capturing a variety of wing positions.
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Time Sipper

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Since the hummingbirds returned to my back garden in mid April, I have been watching these amazing little creatures. My Sugarwater Station and blossoming cactuses attract them and they buzz about vigorously. They are the only local wild birds in my garden that are not afraid of me. Last week I positioned my chair to about 2.5 meters (8 or 9 feet) from the feeder, and caught several frames of a female black-chinned hummingbird at full zoom on my Lumix DMC-FZ2500. The result was "Little Spirit" (which you can view in my Nature Photography folder or--for the time being--my Featured folder). She is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) long, and I think this is the most extreme closeup I've ever managed of a wild bird. I believe hummingbirds perceive time at a different rate than humans. What they perceive, we would call slow motion, perhaps by a factor of 20. They are time sippers. I believe this with considerable confidence. Why? The distances their nerve impulses travel within their brains
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Thanks for watching, very much appreciated

Thank you for watching, as well.

Thank you so much for awarding me a yellow shard of that Tutorial challenge! :)

Thank you for the watch and the favs, much much appreciated! :nod:

Thank you for the favorite on Sandhill Crane

thanks so much for the badge :nod: :)