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... for all your birthday wishes from two months ago... :)
You may have noticed that I haven't posted anything on DA for almost a year now and I don't think I will be coming back anytime soon... If you missed my artwork you can follow me at these different places: on my blog, on twitter or on facebook.
Sorry for the long absence... I will probably be posting stuff from time to time here, but you can also follow me on my blog, on twitter or on facebook.
... found non-avian dinosaurs were responsible for their own demise. Read the story at paleoexhibit.blogspot.com/2015…


Reconstruction of Dickinsonia costata

One of the most famous fossils of the Ediacara biota is Dickinsonia,  first described by Sprigg in 1947. Dickinsonia fossils were preserved as imprints of ovoid or ribbon- like creatures with bilateral symmetry. Their sizes range from a few millimeters to practically a meter in length. The animal also appeared to be segmented. The affinities of Dickinsonia were and is, still today, highly debated... Continue reading on Paleoexhibit.


Here are my picks for the top paleontology stories of year 2014 (not in particular order):

1) Fossilized pigments show mesozoic marine reptiles in their true colors. 

    Tylosaurus nepaeolicus

Ref: Lindgren, J., Sjövall, P., Carney, R. M., Uvdal, P., Gren, J. A., Dyke, G., ... & Polcyn, M. J. (2014). Skin pigmentation provides evidence of convergent melanism in extinct marine reptiles. Nature. 506, 484–488.

    

2) Copulation and internal fertilization have appeared 385 millions years ago in primitive armored fish adding a big step to our understanding of the evolution of sex in our distant ancestors.

Ref: Long, J. A., Mark-Kurik, E., Johanson, Z., Lee, M. S., Young, G. C., Min, Z., ... & Trinajstic, K. (2014). Copulation in antiarch placoderms and the origin of gnathostome internal fertilization. Nature. Published online


3) New fossils of the cambrian chordate Metaspriggina walcotti show that it was an early very primitive fish.


Metaspriggina walcotti

Ref: Morris, S. C., & Caron, J. B. (2014). A primitive fish from the Cambrian of North America. Nature, 512(7515), 419-422.


4) Exceptionally well preserved fossilized eye tissues of a 300 millions years old spiny shark, Acanthodes bridgei, shows it had color vision.

Acanthodes sp.

Ref: Tanaka, G., Parker, A. R., Hasegawa, Y., Siveter, D. J., Yamamoto, R., Miyashita, K., ... & Maeda, H. (2014). Mineralized rods and cones suggest colour vision in a 300 Myr-old fossil fish. Nature Communications, 5, 5920.


5) Spinosaurus was an odd-looking semi-aquatic predator that might have walked on all four.

Ref: Ibrahim, N., Sereno, P. C., Dal Sasso, C., Maganuco, S., Fabbri, M., Martill, D. M., ... & Iurino, D. A. (2014). Semiaquatic adaptations in a giant predatory dinosaur. Science, 345(6204), 1613-1616.

Spinosaurus aegyptiacus

6) Two new fossils of Deinocheirus mirificus solved 44 years old “terror arms” mystery.

Deinocheirus mirificus
Ref: Lee, Y. N., Barsbold, R., Currie, P. J., Kobayashi, Y., Lee, H. J., Godefroit, P., ... & Chinzorig, T. (2014). Resolving the long-standing enigmas of a giant ornithomimosaur Deinocheirus mirificus. Nature. 515, 257–260.


Dreadnoughtus schrani

7) Dreadnoughtus schrani, one of the largest dinosaurs and the most complete skeleton of a titanosaur to have been discovered to date.

Ref: Lacovara, K. J., Lamanna, M. C., Ibiricu, L. M., Poole, J. C., Schroeter, E. R., Ullmann, P. V., ... & Novas, F. E. (2014). A Gigantic, Exceptionally Complete Titanosaurian Sauropod Dinosaur from Southern Patagonia, Argentina. Scientific reports, 4, 6196.


Kulindadromeus zabaikalicus

8) The discovery of the feathered ornithischian Kulindadromeus zabaikalicus, suggests that the earliest dinosaurs probably also sported feathers.

Ref: Godefroit, P., Sinitsa, S. M., Dhouailly, D., Bolotsky, Y. L., Sizov, A. V., McNamara, M. E., ... & Spagna, P. (2014). A Jurassic ornithischian dinosaur from Siberia with both feathers and scales. Science, 345(6195), 451-455.


Vintana sertichi

9) The discovery of a complete skull of Vintana sertichi shed light on an obscure group of mammals called Gondwanatheres previously reported from teeth and jaw fragments only.

Ref: Krause, D. W., Hoffmann, S., Wible, J. R., Kirk, E. C., Schultz, J. A., von Koenigswald, W., ... & Andriamialison, H. (2014). First cranial remains of a gondwanatherian mammal reveal remarkable mosaicism. Nature, 515(7528), 512-517.


Atopodentatus unicus

10.- Atopodentatus unicus is probably one of the strangest vertebrate fossil ever found.

Ref: Cheng, L., Chen, X. H., Shang, Q. H., & Wu, X. C. (2014). A new marine reptile from the Triassic of China, with a highly specialized feeding adaptation. Naturwissenschaften, 101(3), 251-259.


Semirostrum cerrutii

11.- A fossil porpoise, Semirostrum cerrutii, reveals unique skim feeding habit.

Ref: Racicot, R. A., Deméré, T. A., Beatty, B. L., & Boessenecker, R. W. (2014). Unique Feeding Morphology in a New Prognathous Extinct Porpoise from the Pliocene of California. Current Biology, 24(7), 774-779.


12.- A massive genomic analysis on 44 species of birds representing all extant orders resolves bird tree-of-life and ancestry. Chickens and turkeys, it turns out, were found to be more closer to their dinosaur ancestors than any other birds.

Ref: Jarvis, E. D., Mirarab, S., Aberer, A. J., Li, B., Houde, P., Li, C., ... & Samaniego, J. A. (2014). Whole-genome analyses resolve early branches in the tree of life of modern birds. Science, 346(6215), 1320-1331.

All images on this journal are copyrighted to Nobu Tamura under a Creative Commons 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0) license meaning that you are free to use them for non commercial purposes as long as you properly credit the author (© N. Tamura). Questions: contact me at nobu dot tamura at yahoo dot com.

    The  highly anticipated  4th franchise of the Jurassic Park series has just managed to further alienate a bunch of dinosaur enthusiasts around the world. The Hollywood choice of displaying featherless (and thus inaccurate according to modern scientific standards) retrograde theropods and an overly oversized mosasaur for need of sensationalism are one thing but using artworks from independent artists without proper attributions or compensation is another (this is called “art theft” I believe).

    It all started with renowned paleoartist :icongogosardina: Brian Choo noticing some oddly familiar silhouettes including his own Minmi in one of the photo stills released by Legendary Pictures (www.deviantart.com/journal/Hmm…). This was immediately followed by overwhelming outrage among paleoartists on social medias. You can read more about that latest screw-up from the major movie company on :iconmattmart: Matt Martyniuk’s Dinogoss (dinogoss.blogspot.com/2014/11/…), :iconglendonmellow: Glendon Mellow’s piece on Symbiartic (blogs.scientificamerican.com/s… ) and on Krank.ie (www.krank.ie/category/sci/jura… ).

Dinosaurs of the British Isles: the book: paleoexhibit.blogspot.com/2014…
An educational app for ipad and iphone sponsored by the Naturalis Biodiveristy center in the Netherlands [www.naturalis.nl/en/] and developed by ETI BioInformatics just came out. It features 165 of my dinosaur illustrations. The first version is in Dutch but there will soon be an English one as well. Check it out: itunes.apple.com/us/app/dinosa…

Note: it's also available on Android devices: play.google.com/store/apps/det…
My artworks got featured on the 19th issue of Tasmanian Geographic: www.tasmaniangeographic.com/co…

Also on FoxNews: www.foxnews.com/science/slides…
A new study seems to indicate so: paleoexhibit.blogspot.com/2014…
Happy New Year folks!!!

My pick for the most important discoveries in the paleontology field last year: paleoexhibit.blogspot.com/2014…

(noticed that this journal entry is identical to the previous one from a year ago... only the year changed ;))
Happy New Year folks!!!

My pick for the most important discoveries in the paleontology field last year: paleoexhibit.blogspot.com/2013…
You might have noticed that I am not posting everything on dA... this is all in my personal portfolio at spinops.blogspot.com which is now fast approaching the milestones of 1000 illustrations of sundry prehistoric animals.

Among the latest productions not on dA:
Huxleysaurus holligtoniensis: spinops.blogspot.com/2012/10/h…
Pliosaurus funkei: spinops.blogspot.com/2012/10/p…
Cryopterygius kristiansenae: spinops.blogspot.com/2012/10/c…
Arcovenator escotae: spinops.blogspot.com/2012/10/a…
Tungsenia paradoxa: spinops.blogspot.com/2012/11/t…
Potanichthys xingyiensis: spinops.blogspot.com/2012/11/p…
Gallimimus bullatus: spinops.blogspot.com/2012/11/g…
Coronosaurus brinkmani: spinops.blogspot.com/2012/11/c…
Darwinsaurus evolutionis: spinops.blogspot.com/2012/11/d…
Mantellodon carpenteri: spinops.blogspot.com/2012/11/m…
Vote for your favorite 2011 Paleontology story on paleoexhibit: paleoexhibit.blogspot.com/2011…
Cheers!
Please welcome my talented daughter :iconcaeruluskoi: who just joined dA. Here is a sample of her work:
Silly Ashy by CaerulusKoi

Yes, like everybody her age, she is into animes, pokemons, Naruto and such but she can draw dragons which is the closest I have her so far to draw a dinosaur ;)
Linhevenator: paleoexhibit.blogspot.com/2011… and
www.palaeocritti.com/by-group/…
Talos: paleoexhibit.blogspot.com/2011… and
www.palaeocritti.com/by-group/…

Also, perhaps of less interest for the majority of you, dinosaur fans:
Juramaia: www.palaeocritti.com/by-group/…
Smok: www.palaeocritti.com/by-group/…
and paleoexhibit.blogspot.com/2011…
Latoplatecarpus: paleoexhibit.blogspot.com/2011…
Diodorus: paleoexhibit.blogspot.com/2011…
Samrukia: paleoexhibit.blogspot.com/2011…
Hey folks,

I am trying to compile a list of the 50 most significant paleontological discoveries of the millennium (year 2000 to present). Let me know what in your opinion are the most significant discoveries of the decade. Anything from the first determination of the feather colors in a dinosaur ( Anchiornis), to the discovery of a prehistoric insular giant rabbit (Nuralagus) will do. Please, be creative and do not only give me a long list of theropod dinosaurs...Thanks!
Just finished my series on stegosaurs of the British Isles: paleoexhibit.blogspot.com/2011…

Also made a new t-rex for a colleague (Will be posted soon...) and a few other critters including Latoplatecarpus, Juramaia and Smok...

Working on the British Ankylosaurs now.
I haven't been posting much on dA lately as I am quite busy with lots of little things these days.

As for news, I've started a blog at paleoexhibit.blogspot.com/
and will be posting some artworks there as well, especially those that are not of much interest on dA. Last post was on my little project on prehistoric plants.

Concerning the recently started Facebook Paleoexhibit group, it is 57 members strong and reasonably active so will keep it open for now.
Just experimenting the Group feature on FB, for posting, discussing paleoart and related stuff... might or might not work. Only time will tell, but if you like paleoart and have an account on Facebook, feel free to join and post... (the group name is Paleoexhibit)