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Nsio's Four Tools for a Successful Drawing

Let's face it, drawing is hard. Especially for a beginner, learning to draw seem dauntingly challenging. Even more experienced artists have it hard and I'm not anyway different from that. At the same time, weirdly enough, drawing is surprisingly simple and straightforward thing to do. But that's when you know what you are doing.

In fact, drawing is probably hard for you just because you don't know how it's done. And if you ask an artist how it's done, you will likely get rather vague answer. They know how to do it, but they don't know how to explain it for you. Drawing is full of concepts that simply don't translate well for an average Joe. Also, even if a great artists gives you a tip how to draw something, you probably still have troubles at executing it. You just don't see things the way the artist does., so you might even end up using the tip wrong, but believing in it so hard that you can't correct yourself. Not to mention the actual drawing part: transferring the image from your mind on the canvas via your hand.

Although there are many things about drawing that needs to be learned, I find that there are four things you should focus on. I call these “The Four Tools for a Successful Drawing”. They are:

  1. Knowledge

  2. Perception

  3. Insight

  4. Muscle Memory

At first glance, these don't seem to yield any specific tool to achieve anything. However, in my opinion these are the most basic and essential building blocks for drawing a successful drawing. Or rather, these are the prerequisites for taking full advantage of everything else. I'll try to cover every tool briefly.

1.Knowledge

You just can't get over this. You need to know what you are doing. Not only you need to know the subject you are drawing, you need to know what means you have to recreate with your chosen medium. Knowledge is something you gain only by doing research and studies about everything, although you need to focus only on few things at first.

Of the four tools, knowledge is the most straightforward to acquire. Gaining knowledge can be hard for various reasons. This is because there are at least three kind of knowledge available for you: true knowledge, false knowledge and transmuted knowledge. At first, when you lack even the initial knowledge to tell these apart, you don't know which kind of knowledge you are gaining.

The good thing is that most of the time you are fed with true knowledge trough your eyes. However, without proper insight and perception, you have no way to tap into this knowledge (which is why those tools are invaluable). You simply don't understand it. This leads into assumptions or believing in something that's not quite the truth, making you rely on false knowledge. Also, if we don't get to apply that knowledge, we tend to forget it fairly quickly. When we recall something we have forgotten, the knowledge may get transmuted in the process, which again leads into possible accumulation of false knowledge.

Another good thing is that you can acquire new knowledge trough trial and error. If you have the insight and perception, you can learn whether your knowledge is true or false and filter the knowledge that you will need. You may also come up with assumptions which will eventually lead into true knowledge, even though you aren't putting any conscious efforts in it.

2. Perception

Although you can't draw anything with just your eyes, your perception is the greatest tool for acquiring true knowledge and insight, so you will want to make sure you see things the right way.

An artist sees things in whole different way when compared to an average Joe. To put it short, nothing is as it seems. The reason a beginner can't see things the way artist does is the fact that they rely too much on false knowledge. Even though they are seeing exactly the same thing as the artist, their assumptions about the subject leads them astray. This holds true especially with colors. For example, we know that leaves of tree are green. However, if you paint it with green color, it will end up wrong. A leaf is anything but green, so the artists use all manner of colors you might not have even thought, and the leaf may end up looking more real than the reality itself. Using really dark blue or purple instead of true black can make the black look even more black.

The reason for this is that in normal circumstances, we don't need such information. The amount of data flooding our retinas is so great that our brains just don't bother to process it all, when simple reactions will get the job done. For example, it's enough that we know that the leafs are green, so the additional information is discarded right away. You need to learn seeing things the way they are, not the way you think they are. You will need to learn bypass the filtering your brain does to get access into true knowledge. This is the requirement for seeing and understanding the three dimensional nature of our world and many other visual distortions that make things look so real.

One good way to train your perceptions is to take a look at optical illusions. They will make your brains go in limbo, when it tries its best to make sense of the image. Optical illusions make you aware of the true state of things, which allows you to gain invaluable insight. Once you have the understanding, you can have very accurate visual images in your mind, which are much more easier to put on canvas. That said, I find that perception is as much about the ability of imagining things visually in mind as it's about seeing the physical subject.

Perception works in tandem with insight, because it's the tool that decipher the constant data stream that floods your eyes. Simultaneously your perception gives your insight feedback about the subject so that you can learn more about it. These two tools augment each other so greatly that you might be able to draw decently even without doing comprehensive studies about the subject.

3. Insight

In my opinion, insight is the most valuable tool of the four. You could treat insight as the bridge between other tools. Insight filter knowledge you need, decipher visual feedback into new insight and knowledge, steer your perception with help of knowledge, guides your hand for gaining more accurate muscle memory. In fact, even if you don't have any skills on any of the tree other tools, your insight will help you to gain them. I'm telling this from my own experience, as my drawing skills went trough a drastic change once I started to focus on gaining the insight.

Although drawing seems very complicated, many things are actually very simple. Many of these things can be considered as rules which when followed almost always guarantee a successful drawing. There are a lot of these so called rules. Some of them work alone, some work together with other rules, while some even override certain rules. For example, humans generally have quite symmetric face, with two eyes. Even if you see the face from any other angle than front, the symmetry is still there. Then it's just about thinking how you will see the eyes from the chosen viewing angle. As already mentioned, perception augments insight greatly.

The way our minds work is quite fascinating. We all have our own views about things, which can also make us too inflexible to adjust on another way of thinking.With right mindset, you can learn to draw anything. You need to accept that your point of view or way of doing things aren't always the optimal or desirable. You shouldn't be afraid of making changes in yourself and in your values if it will prove beneficial for you in the long run. With open mind, many doors will be unlocked for you to explore and you can see yourself which paths will work for your particular needs the best.

To gain insight, you need to question your actions constantly. Is this really the way I want to draw? Am I satisfied with this drawing and if I'm not, why? You also need to be honest with yourself. With help of perception, you should be able to tell if your drawing is wonky. It's then about using your insight to figure out what's the cause and take proper actions to correct yourself. For example, if your drawing constantly end up looking flat and two dimensional, you need to focus on gaining insight about three dimensional shapes and learning to see the mass and volume. If you have a habit of drawing hairy lines, you need to focus on drawing techniques more.

My insight focus mostly on perspective, dynamism and proportions, as I found them most essential in my needs. For quite some time, I have been relying almost entirely on my insight to come up with everything I know about drawing, thought my perception has also played important part in that.

4. Muscle memory

Simply put, muscle memory is all about the physical skills of your hand to accurately transfer your image from your mind on the canvas. This is the hardest tool to master, and sadly it's the only tool that actually makes your drawing visible for others. There are no shortcuts here. No matter how much knowledge you gain, how great your insight or perception is, you can learn drawing only by physically doing it it. Theory alone just won't do it.

The reason I named the fourth tool “muscle memory” is that it's the thing that makes it possible for us to master skills that require the utmost precision. As you practice, the muscles of your hand will become better at utilizing the pen accurately. When you have been drawing long enough, your hand just knows how to draw the things you want. At this point, you don't need to put conscious effort in drawing, you can focus only on creating art.

Gaining muscle memory takes patience and determination. Basically that means drawing same things over and over again. You also need to do that regularly, otherwise you get rusty (your perception and hand go out of sync). However, getting rusty isn't completely bad thing. In fact, overcoming the rust will help you gain even better muscle memory since you need to recall the forgotten things. For example, every time I start a practice, I always draw a general standing pose first, so it comes almost automatically without too much of effort, even if I haven't been drawing for weeks.

Similar to knowledge, you can also gain harmful muscle memory. You need to get rid of tendencies that won't contribute to the art and aim for fine control of your hand. This is where drawing techniques come handy. Techniques aren't something you should need to think about while creating art. It's important to practice art and techniques separately, so that you can channel your mind only on few things at time. If you have seen the beginnings of my livestreams, you have seen me drawing just seemingly random lines and circles. Drawing quick shapes and lines repeatedly is great way to warm up and to train the accuracy of the muscles. Gesture drawings are another way to train muscle memory while applying the techniques on art creation. It's also much faster than trying to draw full and detailed human figures.


I know that everything I say here is very general and debatable, but unfortunately it's not possible to go trough things in greater details without writing a complete book, but I do hope that reading this will help you to gain new insight and knowledge about drawing, so that you can perceive things more like an artist and start training your hand vigorously. Try to ignore the innuendo there.


Nsio of the Hermit Mystics

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:iconutrilus:
Utrilus Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
On the fifth page of google search: "drawing "bad for you""
Good job nsio!
Pretty much my own assumpions are pretty similar to your conclusions.

And as I pay attention to these things, I must inform you that you are using negative words in your language. As in words difficult and "sadly its the way it is". I do not fall pray to these parasitic nocebos. :D
Reply
:iconkemikly:
KemikLy Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2015  Professional General Artist
You hit the nail on the head. And for the record, if you ever do a book I will want to read it! :P
Reply
:iconpalowsky:
palowsky Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
I have the same beliefs about these things. But I think you have explained it better than I. 
I too am a firm believer of having your mind and your hand as the only 2 tools you ever need no matter what medium you use.
Reply
:iconr3dtyrant:
R3dTyrant Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I have to say I enjoy reading this journal, it serves as great reference material and a pep talk to supplement my regular practice schedule. :D

For me it's always been a problem trying to push myself. I've meandered around art for years, with a mixed bag of results. I don't have the luxury to attend figure drawing classes, rather I observe and study drawings by many other people to gain more insight into how they perceive mass and volume and apply it to my own work. I rise to the challenge to test my limits and push myself further everyday. It's actually pretty common these days for me to log ~4 hours of "self-aware" art study and another 2-4 hours of fun time almost everyday! I believe actions speak louder than words, to the point that it's my personal mantra. Talk is cheap, y'know? :lol:
Reply
:iconnsio:
Nsio Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks :D

I myself find all the classes, courses and exercises suffocating. Although obviously they are useful as they guide the artists forward, basically they still need to do things on their own. Thanks to all the tutorials and tips online, there is plenty of material to study independently.

Conversations with fellow artists are quite fruitful, but your own actions speak the loudest indeed :)
Reply
:iconr3dtyrant:
R3dTyrant Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I agree, the startling amount of visual and artistic information we have at our disposal today is inspiring! Although a
great deal of this material can be helpful, I tend to avoid the "step-by-step" format of many tutorials and look for
more conceptually informative tutorials such as your fantastic series, Loomis, Mattesi, etc.

Step-based tutorials are structured to allow someone with little or no artistic knowledge to able to compose a piece
in a relatively short period of time. The problem with this approach is that it only teaches the artist how to draw
with a limited understanding of the subject. As you so eloquently put it:
"We aren't drawing 2D objects. Although we are drawing on a two-dimensional surface, the world we live in is 3D.":D

Furthermore, I believe it isn't enough to be aware of what we are drawing. We must understand that our dreams
are unreachable when they are passing whimsies of our idle minds. A goal is a dream that has a blueprint for success,
if that makes sense. ^^;

You can pardon my exuberance if you wish. The last month has been a roller coaster ride of ellipses and poorly drawn
chest cavities. When I'm feeling particularly motivated, I like to pour my thoughts into haikus. It's a fun way to document
your growth as you understand your inner purpose. :)

tl;dr Art is fun, and I learn more about it everyday. :giggle:
Reply
:iconalicesacco:
AliceSacco Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2014   Digital Artist
I'm practicing hard on my weak points (at the moment I'm working on perspective - 1, 2 and 3 point, and basic shapes, trying to re-learn to draw and while doing so studying deeper actual anatomy (trying to learn to draw it from memory).
Reply
:iconkeiboxy2:
Keiboxy2 Featured By Owner Sep 15, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Good read,i'll try and apply these into future drawings
Reply
:iconmochichama:
mochichama Featured By Owner Sep 14, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
agree to all,
i just realized this recently draw and memorize, i stop for several month before,
it takes a while to get used to draw again,
still struggle with perception and insight and thats when discussion with other artists really help
Reply
:iconfishupantsu:
fishupantsu Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2014
Although I don't really understand insight and perception very well, I still found the muscle memory part really helpful ^^
I guess its time to look for bad habits and get rid of them..
Reply
:iconfludd108:
fludd108 Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2014
I truley feel enlightened after reading this. Thank you for taking the time to write it all down. These tools can be applied to more than just drawing. Much more.
Reply
:icondrgig:
Drgig Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Student General Artist
very nice 
Reply
:iconprincipiantebaldosa:
principiantebaldosa Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
Thanks for taking the time into writing this. It's very helpful as it may not be full detail it invites to greater reflection about drawing and how to improve.

Reading this reminded me how I was lazying around some details at drawing and then asked myself why I couldn't draw any better. Being lazy is realy dangearous at drawing, and overcoming it means using these tools
Reply
:iconnsio:
Nsio Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes. One needs to know the fundamentals in order to keep improving constantly, even though it's so tempting just to start drawing right away.

Yeah, that kind of laziness is harmful. However, there is this so called "artistic laziness" which is worth aiming for. In short, it's about getting over the drawing process with as less effort as possible and always seeking for more efficient ways of doing that :D Less is more as they say xD
Reply
:iconprincipiantebaldosa:
principiantebaldosa Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
"artistic laziness" sounds like cheating xD, well I might end up doing that.
Reply
:iconnsio:
Nsio Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It may sound like that, but it's really a good thing. Especially if you plan on making money with your art, the less you need to do, the better. For example, why spending 40 hours on details, when you can make an illusion of a detailed work within one hour, and it will end up looking even more detailed than the work where you would waste a lot of effort. This is the concept, figuring out how much exactly you need to do to to achieve results that is on par or better with more refined works.
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:iconprincipiantebaldosa:
principiantebaldosa Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
It's true, I guess it doesn't matter how detailed you want something if not many people are going to take a look at that.

Well those might be two different aproaches to one task, you just pick the one that is needed, whether you like it or not.

I may just be in a narrow minded phase where I want things detailed and complicated still I will have to admit that there are many works that have caught my like and were done in that efficient way.
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:icondraxonis-lupusvi:
Draxonis-LupusVI Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
thank you for this, I'll be sure to work on all 4 of these aspects in my work
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:iconmagra123:
Magra123 Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
very interesting and quite informative, i really liked the part about the muscular memory and rust, ive gone throught that a few times and it always seems to help me get better at what im doing xD
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:iconnsio:
Nsio Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes I like that part as well. It helped me to get over the rust a lot because I knew how useful it would be in long run. :D
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:iconmagra123:
Magra123 Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
yeah, its funny how after a while of not drawing it seems to get easier to clean the rust xD, last time i just happened to some how got a grip on perspective and before that i couldnt do that for the life of me xD.
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:iconchirutai:
Chirutai Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014
That was a good read. Almost makes me want to seriously pick up drawing ahah
Well, if life wasn't so busy that I gave up on it, you would be the best teacher!
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:iconnsio:
Nsio Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Right? xD But it's very understandable that the we are always so busy that it's hard to dedicate any time on drawing. It's such a shame
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:iconchirutai:
Chirutai Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2014
Too many cat videos to watch on Youtube... And let's not talk about the pokémon to catch.
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:iconcestarian:
Cestarian Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014   Digital Artist
Read Ernest's book on perspective and you'll be drawing in no time ;)
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:iconchirutai:
Chirutai Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014
Oh, I do believe I have gathered enough guides and references to get decent skills in drawing if I was ready to dedicate enough time and energy into it. The problem is that life keeps me busy enough that I could not dedicate enough time a week to build up anything. No time to learn the basics and then train enough.
But thank you for the book, kind sir, if I ever find myself in a position to try and start drawing, it might come in handy!
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:iconcestarian:
Cestarian Featured By Owner Edited Sep 11, 2014   Digital Artist
You don't have 20 hours? Our brains are much more advanced than we tend to give it credit for.

The time dedication is less than you think, also there is a very neat trick when it comes to motor skills and that is practicing them just before you go to sleep (they will improve more rapidly within about a 4 time period of falling asleep because your brain will try to rewire itself somehow to increase your ability to complete that motor skill with more ease next time overnight. You literally learn it overnight, and this is not just picking the skills up "a little bit" faster, but the requirement is that you aim for precision above everything else in this time period, that is to draw "perfect" lines and "perfect" curves or as close as you can possibly get, draw a sheet of circles, straight lines and curves every night and do them as well as you posisbly can, and you're gonna get much better at it much faster than most people), this is how you can avoid spending years upon years to get the stroke finesse required for professional artists :dummy: I've been doing this for a month and I've improved insanely much in the motor skill aka muscle memory area. (This can be applied to any motor skill)

This just for 10-30 minutes of my time before I hit the sack. Not a lot of time is it? it can be reduced to something as low as 2 minutes since quality is more important than quantity. I just like increasing the quantity because that means I can draw something fun while at it.

The other stuff can be 10-30 minutes just after breakfast; or just in your break at work when you probably have nothing better to do than draw and eat anyways, or just after you get home from work. You can even work on a full glorious piece 30 minutes at a time for a week, 30 minutes per day becomes 2 hours in 4 days.

After you accumulate to about 20 hours total of drawing, you'll already be decent and that's less than the time in one day. Narrowing down further what you really need to learn besides line finesse, the knowledge you need is
1: Perspective (I have not found any actually true knowledge about this, but a lot of transmuted knowledge which is what ernest's book has in all of it's glory, all the most importnat bits of perspective are in his first like 50 pages, much more in-depth than this video) my recommended method of practicing it is to just spam a page with boxes and cylinders from random viewing angles.
2: Lighting and Shading (their importance cannot be stressed enough, earnest's book also has a decent amount of basics about shade, shadow and most importantly estimation of cast shadow that I have seen nowhere else mentioned) this one is more difficult to practice because light is a mathematically mind boggling subject. But ideally I think the best way to practice it would be something in this direction. (Or simply applying it to drawings) it might be a good idea to practice lighting and shading on a perspective practice sheet, after you have drawn all the boxes and cylinders.

Those 2 are really just about it. There are a lot, and I mean A LOT of other skills to learn regarding art, so many your head will swirl. But if you understand perspective and lighting/shading well, all the others are just a bit like spice, an extra flavoring, topping over the ice. Things like

1: Gesture/Flow/Rhythm
2: Simplification of complex anatomy (and of course understanding the underlying anatomy first which is a requirement)
3: Color Theory (There's also a good book on this by James Gurney called Color and Light I think, it also has some info on lighting/shading ofc)
4: Composition
5: Color Management (and other technical aspects if drawing digitally)

But you just need these first two, perspective, light and shadow (and how they form 3D shape), and you'll be well on your way towards being a friggen great artist. Not so complicated once you narrow it down is it? The most important factor of course, is to have fun while doing all this. The reason these two are all you truly need in the knowledge area to go very far, is because that is how our eyes work. Light is what we see (as in the only thing we can see, color is not on objects, it is a byproduct of the light bouncing off the object, color happens because light slows down when it hits surfaces, the more it slows down the darker the color values, white being highest, black being darkest and all the other colors inbetween just so happen to occur, this has been explored by science and they call it the frequency of light), and perspective is how we see, or more importantly, how we see depth; the Z axis. On paper we already have the X and Y axis, but we have to be able to create an illusion of a Z axis in order for art to look like it's in 3D space. That's basically what perspective is. Therefore, due to the simple means of how our eyes actually work, your understanding of light/shadow and perspective is always going to be the foundation for your art, unless you're an abstract artist or something like that where these do not hold any meaning anymore (that's where Gesture/Rhythm becomes more important than the two important factors of painting something believable)
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:iconalicesacco:
AliceSacco Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2014   Digital Artist
The time dedication is less than you think, also there is a very neat trick when it comes to motor skills and that is practicing them just before you go to sleep (they will improve more rapidly within about a 4 time period of falling asleep because your brain will try to rewire itself somehow to increase your ability to complete that motor skill with more ease next time overnight. You literally learn it overnight, and this is not just picking the skills up "a little bit" faster, but the requirement is that you aim for precision above everything else in this time period, that is to draw "perfect" lines and "perfect" curves or as close as you can possibly get, draw a sheet of circles, straight lines and curves every night and do them as well as you posisbly can, and you're gonna get much better at it much faster than most people), this is how you can avoid spending years upon years to get the stroke finesse required for professional artists I am a dummy! I've been doing this for a month and I've improved insanely much in the motor skill aka muscle memory area. (This can be applied to any motor skill)

- I didn't know this, but now i understand why I learn better when I practice after midnight.
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:iconchirutai:
Chirutai Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2014
Well, that's certainly thorough! I suppose it is worth a try!

Thank you.
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:iconpaulgq:
PaulGQ Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Woah, this is on point!

There aren't many artists that like to explain all the meta-aspects to drawing like you did!
While practice is what an artist needs to do to improve, these are the steps within the process of practicing that truly works the improvement of an artist's skill!

Grape job!
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:iconnsio:
Nsio Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
indeed, artists seem reluctant at explaining the facts about the concept of drawing. Either that, or they don't know how to do that. I also believe that aspiring artists don't bother to put too much thought into these, because these concepts don't offer any immediate means to make drawings.

Thanks :)
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:icontidalespeon:
TidalEspeon Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
In terms of training insight, when one looks to be able to draw figures from pretty much any angle at any pose, what would one do?
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:iconnsio:
Nsio Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Then it's either time to enjoy one's abilities and just draw, or fill in the gaps in your insight about other fields, like body language, anatomy... you name it.
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:icontidalespeon:
TidalEspeon Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
Oh, I see. So, thats the sort of complex thing that requires bunch of other requisites to achieve the goal.

Though I doubt any but the most expert of artists could simply be satisfied with their abilities and just draw ^^; Thanks tho.
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:iconkura-ou:
kura-ou Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Student Digital Artist
I want to thank you for always taking your time to write out the little details in every tutorial that you make :)

It's very helpful for those of us who do have the patience to both read and apply your teachings.
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:iconnsio:
Nsio Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
No problem, sometimes I just feel frustrated when I see people struggling with drawing when it's actually surprisingly simple thing to do. The concepts behind drawing makes so much sense now that I'm surprised how I didn't get this at first either. The world of an artist is just so different that it's challenging to get into it. I'm always trying to figure out how to translate my thoughts in such a form that people would understand what they need to do in order to improve. :D
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:iconkura-ou:
kura-ou Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Student Digital Artist
Q__Q Really, thank you so much for your selflessnes and for your reply.

I agree that it is challenging. Before reading your tutorials, I didn't have much of an understanding for the fundamentals and they really helped with some of them ;u;

Ahhh, you remind me of my art professors--all of you are detailed but concisely and understandably so. Your diction and style of writing is very clear, so please don't worry >u< I think a few of us may have language barriers, but many of us will be glad to help out those individuals if we can so that you can just focus on what you like doing ^^

Thanks again :D
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:iconmickodaimao:
MickoDaimao Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014
Too long did not read, lol xD
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:iconnsio:
Nsio Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well too bad for you then xD
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:iconmickodaimao:
MickoDaimao Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2014
Well now since you put it that way i had to read it xD
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