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What does 'quite' mean? (e.g. "I'm quite happy today") 

81%
75 deviants said Very
19%
18 deviants said Slightly

Devious Comments

:iconmaxnort:
maxnort Featured By Owner Jun 9, 2018   Writer
both. I am told  it  is here, somewhere?
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:iconehsol-namu:
Ehsol-namu Featured By Owner May 22, 2018
In th example sentence, “quite” would be closer to “very,” but as someone said, “quite” means slightly more than average. 
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 22, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Huhh, interesting.
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:iconautumn-hills:
Autumn-Hills Featured By Owner May 21, 2018  Professional Writer
It's absolutely both, in that it can be either depending on context.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 21, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
In the sentence above, though, how'd you interpret it?
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:iconautumn-hills:
Autumn-Hills Featured By Owner May 21, 2018  Professional Writer
Usually, without tone to guide me, I'd interpret it as "more or less", "adequately", or "slightly". But it could be either from the given context.
Tone of voice is the guide here.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 21, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Hah I'd interpret the opposite.

Yeah also syntactic context. Hadn't thought about it before, but basically this comments.deviantart.com/14/727…
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:iconautumn-hills:
Autumn-Hills Featured By Owner May 22, 2018  Professional Writer
Cutie Nod 
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:iconartfulbalance:
ArtfulBalance Featured By Owner May 21, 2018  Hobbyist Writer
This one was quite the mindbender. (;

Actually upon being prompted I feel that "quite" for means "slightly more than the average dose of adjective."
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 21, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Haha, right?

Huuuh.
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:iconjwa2277:
JWA2277 Featured By Owner May 20, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
It actually means content, satisfied.
Contentivly happy, satisfactorily happy.
However those that say it, I find are usually lying. Trying to get the point accross that you have lost something or can't sell them something.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 20, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Quite?
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:iconjwa2277:
JWA2277 Featured By Owner Edited May 20, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Yes quite, quite right.

:D
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 20, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
O:
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:iconjwa2277:
JWA2277 Featured By Owner May 20, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
:)
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:iconcrimsonmagpie:
CrimsonMagpie Featured By Owner May 19, 2018
as a brit i use understatement a lot, so 'quite' will usually mean very. for example 'i'm quite drunk' = very drunk; 'i'm a little bit drunk' = madly shitted-up. 
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 19, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Oooh.

Your non sarcasticuse of understatement is forever confounding o:
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:iconcrimsonmagpie:
CrimsonMagpie Featured By Owner May 19, 2018
just a smidgin, innit? :p
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 19, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
O:
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:iconkoushoku-jin:
Koushoku-jin Featured By Owner May 19, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
:iconyoyosecretplz:   *pssst* Senpai... I think that's what a Librarian would always say with it gets too noisy in the Library...
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 19, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
:lol: say or shout?
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:iconkoushoku-jin:
Koushoku-jin Featured By Owner May 19, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
:iconshuturmonkeymouthplz:  Shhh-shhh-shhh... don't want to hear that old hag scream: "QUITE! QUITE DOWN DER~!!GIT OUT IP YOU DON'T BE QUITE!
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 19, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
:lol:
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:icondamonwakes:
DamonWakes Featured By Owner May 19, 2018  Professional Writer
Either. It depends partly on how it's said and partly on what follows. "I'm quite happy, but still concerned about..." would suggest "slightly," but "I'm quite happy: it's my birthday!" would suggest "very."

In writing without any other context I'd tend to assume "slightly" because it seems to be the standard usage of the word. Even when someone says "Careful, it's quite hot," they don't typically mean very hot. It's "Don't get surprised and drop it" rather than "Seriously, get some oven gloves."
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 19, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Haha I would absolutely mean very hot! As far as my friend and I can tell, usage is flipped across the Atlantic.
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:iconstatic-parrot:
Static-Parrot Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2018  Hobbyist Writer
With Brits it can mean a range of things. For instance:
"That's quite the idea." = "You fucking retard." 
"That's quite nice." = "Ewwww!!!"
"It's quite warm out." = "I'm melting! I'm melting!!" 

British English is rife with irony, understatement, exaggeration, euphemism, and tonal implication. 
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Haha, this is one of the things I enjoy about British TV in particular. They're never obviously whining.
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:icondamonwakes:
DamonWakes Featured By Owner May 20, 2018  Professional Writer
Huh. That's kind of interesting.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 20, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Ikr!
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:iconblackbowfin:
BlackBowfin Featured By Owner May 18, 2018   Writer
it's a typo, should be I'm a quiet happy today
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 18, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Sorry, SRSmith got there first :P
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:iconblackbowfin:
BlackBowfin Featured By Owner May 18, 2018   Writer
Aw foot!  I guess another alternative from the mis-spelling (or rather.. misheard) vein....  I'm stepping rather percussively and musically today. :) 
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 18, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Hah!
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:iconbiscuitkris:
BiscuitKris Featured By Owner May 18, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Depends on context. It’s one of those modifiers which is not required in written English, but is an instinctive reply to certain spoken situations to put more or less emphasis on a particular situation. Without judging speaker tone it’s hard to say whether they mean ‘very’ or ‘slightly.’ I went with slightly, but in hindsight it possibly has more relevance to a greater quantity. “That’s quite enough” would imply one has done more than needed. For example. Same for “Not quite there yet.” It could also be deemed as slightly depending on what the speaker believes it quantifies or what the receiver deems also.

Oh, English. Why must you be a beautiful, confusing mess of a language? I love it.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 18, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Hah yeah, unfortunately inflection can still be ambiguous in some of those situations.

It's great until it gets you into trouble P:
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:iconbiscuitkris:
BiscuitKris Featured By Owner May 18, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
I feel it has heavy sarcastic undertones. Or high potential for it the more I think about it. It’s all about those inflections. :P 
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 18, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Haha I swear it sounds more sarcastic in a British accent. (I use 'really' or 'so' if I'm being sarcastic.)
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:iconnawkaman:
nawkaman Featured By Owner May 18, 2018  Hobbyist Writer
More than usual, though sometimes it could be used to imply a still significant but less than exceptional degree.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 21, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Hmm, is that leaning towards a lot?
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:iconnawkaman:
nawkaman Featured By Owner May 21, 2018  Hobbyist Writer
Yes, unless I’m feeling fat and sassy.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 21, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
:lol:
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:icongdeyke:
GDeyke Featured By Owner May 18, 2018   Writer
I'd put it about next to "rather" on the scale.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 18, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
But...where is rather o:
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:icongdeyke:
GDeyke Featured By Owner May 18, 2018   Writer
Fairly?

(Closer to very but somewhat understated.)
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 21, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Haha word.
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:iconmemnalar:
Memnalar Featured By Owner May 18, 2018
Slightly more. Extra oomph. Like, goes to 11. It's the Nigel Tufnel of English.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 18, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
:lol: Excellent.
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:iconsquanpie:
squanpie Featured By Owner May 18, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Either one, meaning interpreted depending on situation or tone of voice - but more often slightly than very.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner May 18, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Oooh. I'm more likely to use it as very.
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:iconlyricanna:
Lyricanna Featured By Owner May 18, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
I'd understand "I'm quite happy" as very but "not quite there yet" to be "in need of a little more work".  So it's context for me.
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