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As part of the Glass Week I am posting interviews and features, there will also be contributions from other galleries as part of this week, check them out here.

Today's Special is all about Stained Glass.


What is Stained Glass?
The term "stained glass" can refer to the material, technique or finished artwork. As a material it is glass that has been colored, traditionally by the addition of metallic salts to the molten silica. As an artwork, it refers to works created with the stained glass technique, often this will be large windows created from multiple pieces of glass held together with strips of lead. The first stained glass windows have been created over a thousand years ago and many are still intact. Most of these old pieces depicted saints or biblical scenes as they were used as decorative windows in churches. In modern times stained glass works have spread to be used as door or window artwork, smaller window decoration pieces, lamps, room dividers, mirror decorations and much much more.
The stained glass technique typically starts with an illustration or pattern of what the finished artwork is supposed to look like. Especially for window and door inlays this pattern has to be very exact as they have to snugly fit into the window or door they are created for. Glass is selected by color and desired effect. The pattern is then used to cut each piece of glass into the correct shape. The glass pieces can then be grozed or filed to get the exact shape needed and pieces can be painted with further details, if desired. All pieces are then arranged in the desired pattern. Traditionally lead came was used to join the glass together, the lead came has channels into which the glass can be inserted, the joints of the came was then soldered together to create the finished artwork. The lead work then has to be cemented for durability and to waterproof the window, to achieve this, a putty traditionally made of linseed oil and calcium carbonate is worked into the space between the lead and the glass. A modern technique, often called the "Tiffany" technique, replaces the lead came with adhesive copper foil which is wrapped around the edges of the glass pieces, flux is applied to the copper foil and the pieces are soldered together. Artists often use a patina to darken the solder, either to highlight details or to achieve the even black color that lead develops with age. The copper foil technique is much more versatile as it can be used to create three dimensional artwork as well as flat panels.
I would like to introduce five of the many costumery artists here on dA who create stunning stained glass works. If you check out the glass gallery, you will find an many amazing works by fantastic artists.


Hello! Could you please introduce yourself?
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:iconjjosryo:
jjosryo : My name is Seshia Murray, I am 22 years old and reside in New Ipswich, NH. I first discovered stained glass while I had skipped out on a class in college... it was a Business class and I would much rather have painted... so I did. :) While I was painting, there was overflow from the stained glass studio and I think I spent more time looking over at what he was doing than focusing on my own work. I signed up for the class, took 6 semesters of and concentrated in it. I'm starting to professionally work as a glass artisan while keeping my full time job until this career takes off. I continue to learn new things about glasswork (both stained and fused) through my job at Centre de Verre.

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:iconaigneadhaigeann:
AigneadhAigeann : Hi there. My name's Theresa Caulkins; I'm a 21 year old art major from New Hampshire. I came across Stained Glass as a whim of a choice for a studio class, because originally I was going in for Illustration. I fell head over heels in love with the medium over the course of my first semester enrolled, and promptly changed my concentration to focus on glass. I hope to pursue it in the future as my career in a partnership with fellow glass enthusiast Seshia Murray.

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:iconbigblued:
bigblued : I’m 42 and I live in a suburb, just North of Chicago called Evanston. My husband and I took a class together at our local stained glass shop in April 2009. I fell in love with it instantly and have been doing it ever since.
In my day-job, I work in a model shop, doing everything from woodwork to welding. This means I already have a strong background in making things, so stained glass was fairly easy to add to my repertoire. I just had to learn how to use a few new tools and internalize how the glass behaves.
After the beginner class, we did take an intermediate class. But this was a self-guided class with a teacher on-hand to offer tips and help through difficult parts. Other than that, I am self taught. The internet has been a tremendous resource, and nothing beats lots of practice when trying to perfect your craft.
At this point it’s far more than a hobby, but not quite enough to quit my job... just yet. In a couple years we hope to have enough business to consider it a full time profession. We just completed our first step towards that goal when we launched our web site, www.sewardstreetstudios.com, over the 4th of July weekend.

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:iconioglass:
ioglass : Hello! We are two 24-year-old girls from Tallinn, Estonia. We’ve been working together for 3 years now, even though we’ve known each other long before we started. One of us is an art teacher and had an obligatory stained glass course at the university as a part of the curriculum; the other one is a building engineer and took that same course voluntarily. We fell in love with stained glass, renewed our friendship, bought all the necessary equipment and so it began. Right now we’re somewhere between a hobby and a career, but we’d really love to make a living off of it.

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:iconjostrartat:
jostrartat : I was born in Middle Africa, Ruanda-Urundi as Johan Streulens and moved from there to Belgium at the age of 7 in 1966. I went to art schools when I could and started with publicity drawing and photography. Got into art high school with Monumental art where I was practising in painting, sculpting, textile, theatre scenes and other art crafts. First time I took notice for Stained glass but didn't do anything with it. Spending a lot of time in experimenting with materials, went to theatre first doing scenography for a couple of years and then get in touch with a stained glass atelier. I started working there and learned fast, making my own designs for little things for churches, mosques, hotels a.o. I worked on new experiments with glass and other materials looking for new styles like glass fountains a.o. I few years later I started my own atelier.

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St. Christopher by AigneadhAigeann :thumb148007759: Swans behind the window. by jostrartat Small dragon 1 by ioglass Star Trek Stained Glass by bigblued
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What types of stained glass do you create and which techniques do you prefer?
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:iconbigblued:
bigblued : Almost all of my pieces are constructed using the copper foil method, where a thin piece of sticky-back copper tape is wrapped around the edges of the glass and then held together with solder. I’ve worked in traditional lead came, and I love how it looks, but I work much faster using the foil and I find it easier to use.
At this point, the bulk of my pieces have been suncatchers. I am trying to build up a library of designs, and a history of sales, and smaller pieces are faster to make and sell much more quickly than big pieces. But big pieces are so much more satisfying, so I try to get one in about once every 3-4 months.

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:iconioglass:
ioglass : Even though we know how to do fusing and work with lead came, it was the tiffany technique that stole our hearts, so mostly we go with copperfoil and solder. We’re not really into lampshades, but we’ve done plenty of window and door panels, suncatchers, souvenirs and glass jewelry such as pendants and brooches. We’ve also created objects and jewelry for artistic photosessions (things that aren’t durable and comfortable enough to wear regularly but look good in pictures) and some contest prizes. We prefer to draw our own sketches and consider it to be one of the most interesting phases of the whole creative process – that way every piece has its own personality and comes from the heart.

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:iconjjosryo:
jjosryo : I create all sorts of different types of panels! I LOVE variety! That's what makes this online art community so much fun. :D I work mostly with copper foil, though I do know how to lead. I prefer the incredible detail that can be achieved with foil. As for the glass, it depends on what type of panel I'm making. I prefer transparent, but if a piece (like the Stargate) calls for opaque I don't object to using it. I also love random art glass, like DaVinci and SilverCoat. I use mainly the top distributors (Bullseye, Spectrum, Armstrong... let's face it, everyone has a budget and these guys are awesome and cheap!) I've never made a panel that had to be specific size, but I generally work up to 3 feet or smaller- panels and lampshades. 3D glasswork is NOT my strong point.

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:iconjostrartat:
jostrartat : I work with antique glass incorporated in lead in combination with other art crafts like etching, printing forms, theatre and sculpting. Learned a lot from older styles in Glass Art and kept on experimenting to create the modern glass styles. I even rip those windows out of their frames and creating more independent pieces like 3 dimensional sculptures, light sculptures or floating windows.

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:iconaigneadhaigeann:
AigneadhAigeann : I specialize in the copper-foil method. I haven't had the opportunity to really play with caning, the closest I've come being in my round windows with the leaded edge. My glass pallette is pretty wide as far as transparency and color go, but I genuinely dislike working with heavily textured glass as a general rule because I want the color and solder lines to speak for themselves to present the design. As far as technique goes, I avoid tapping like the plague. Self-oilers and breakers for the win.

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:thumb154693957: Mucha alike II by jostrartat Barbie Stained Glass by bigblued Sun 2 by ioglass Dreamcatcher by AigneadhAigeann
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When you create a stained glass work, how do you go about it?
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:iconaigneadhaigeann:
AigneadhAigeann : I find my inspiration in all different areas of my life, but I find my best work stems from the aspects that are particularly important to me; I still consider my second project ever, the Skydog Diptych, to be among my best because of that reason. When the inspiration comes and I decide I want to render it in glass, I take a lot of time with the design; I believe the best windows come from solid drawing. I also try to challenge myself with each new design by making the cuts a little more difficult than on the last project (although still possible), to continue to develop my skills. Once the design is ready and the glass selected to bring it to its fullest life, I dive right in and lose myself in the work.

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:iconjostrartat:
jostrartat : To start a creation I always look for new combinations and techniques. For ideas, it doesn't stop in my head, it's madness. Never getting the time to work everything out and still experimenting with other art crafts.

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:iconioglass:
ioglass : It depends on the task. Sometimes we just have some visions of the future piece in our heads, so we just release them to the wild and see what happens. Sometimes it all starts from a particular piece of glass. If we do something for the interior, we look around to see the conditions: the lighting, the furniture, colors, style. And we always talk to our clients, because sometimes they give us clues to what we might come up with. We kinda believe that you can get your inspiration from anywhere – if you’re looking for it, it’ll be there.

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:iconbigblued:
bigblued : I’ve been making things for decades so I have a large library of design books I will often flip through, looking for ideas. And there is the internet, of course. But inspiration can come from anywhere. A perfect example would be this evening, when we went out to see a movie. In one of the previews there were some pigs doing water ballet, and one of the pigs was holding a lotus flower. I thought “Aha! I should make a stained glass lotus!” If you are in the mental place where you are open to ideas, they will come to you from the strangest of places.
Once I have an idea, I will do some quick sketches until I have a basic form that I like. I will then scan in that sketch, and trace it in Adobe Illustrator. Some stained glass artists prefer more organic, hand-drawn forms, but I like the clean tight perfection I can get in the computer.
Traditionally, the next step would be to cut up the pattern and rubber-cement it to the glass, or to place the pattern on a light-box and place the glass over the pattern to use it as a guide for cutting. I don’t use either method.
Many years ago I thought I was going to hit the craft fair circuit selling vinyl car stickers. That plan never really got past buying the vinyl cutter. I now use it to cut my stained glass patterns out of vinyl and stick those to the glass. The vinyl is designed to go through car washes, so it doesn’t budge when I grind the glass, and the patterns are computer perfect which means I don’t have to spend any time fiddling or adjusting to get everything to fit correctly.
From there, it’s the standard process of grinding, foiling and soldering
In general, I prefer the chrome look of polished solder for my suncatchers. I know it isn’t “traditional” But I love how the sparkle catches the light. It does mean that I have to take the extra time to make sure that all of my solder lines have good clean beads on them. With the solder polished to a bright silver, any imperfections will jump right out.

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:iconjjosryo:
jjosryo : Almost anything can inspire me, from an everyday object to a commercial on TV to a single sheet of glass. I write all my ideas down in a notebook and keep my mind open in order to expand and come up with a design for them. Depending on what I'm designing, I'll start my image search with Google. :) I'll compile a bunch of different images based on shape (especially for the zodiac fruits I use) and color. Then I'll take a little from each, or come up with my own object. I always design on newsprint, and I'm always watching something while I'm doing it. The family crest window was designed while I watched a full season of Spongebob Squarepants. :D
After it's done, I take it to a place that makes blueprint copies so I can get the whole image on one sheet. I always misalign something when I have to tape pieces together. :/ I make 3 copies- one to build on, one to cut on, and one in case I'm using opaque glass and need to use that copy to cut out and trace on the glass to get my pieces. From there I choose all my colors at the same time, nail down the copy and get to work. I use a self-oiling pencil cutter, and absolutely loathe tapping. It's the most horrid noise I've ever heard. :( So I use grozing and running pliers to break all my glass. :)
As for finishing, I channel with either zinc or round U-came lead, depending on the shape of the piece. I use tinned copper wire for hooks, double wrapped (around a pencil, actually) for extra strength. I clean it with baking soda to neutralize the flux and then wipe it down with a multi-surface cleaner. I used to wax them, but the wax got fussy and no longer likes to come out of tight spaces and leaves nasty residue.

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Stained Glass Knotwork Ankh by bigblued Brown Abstract .2 by ioglass Royal Flush 1 by AigneadhAigeann Godiva by jostrartat :thumb171603529:
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How long does an average piece take to create and what dimensions do you work in?
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:iconjostrartat:
jostrartat : It's like a battle with yourself to find a way to create it and feeling proud for a little moment that I could reach what I wanted. Then I forged it when I start working on the next piece. So sometimes it takes a few days to create and other times I spend about a month to finishing one piece.

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:iconjjosryo:
jjosryo : Creating a piece from sketch to finish takes anywhere from a few days to an entire month or more- depending on the size and complexity of the panel doubled with the amount of free time I have. As a whole cutting, grinding and foiling takes the longest... soldering and channeling take up to 3 hours. The design itself usually takes the least amount of time :)

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:iconioglass:
ioglass : We create very big ones as well as small ones – for us, size doesn’t really matter, we are okay with everything. And since there are two of us, everything gets done faster. But if there’s no rush, it takes no less than three days to create a piece: one day for sketching and choosing and buying glass, one day for creating a piece (or at least most of it), and one day for finishing, framing and cleaning it (and then we take a picture of it and pack it). It can take longer if we are waiting for a client to approve our sketch or if there is some complicated constructing work involved. We can do a piece within hours if we really need to, but we prefer to take our time.

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:iconaigneadhaigeann:
AigneadhAigeann : Ah man; I don't really have an average size because a lot of my work isn't comparable from one piece to the next; when I was starting out I stuck to 10"x10" little wee panels, but I have since grown to work bigger, round, 3D, and oblong. As far as time goes, I have lost thousands of hours in the studio, haha; I get engrossed in the work and can build a window in a matter of days. But, that also hinges on how excited I am for a piece; the Bailitheoir Biotaille, for instance, took me literally 9 days to draw, cut, and solder, mostly because a lot of my professors were nay-sayers of my endeavors and I wanted to prove them wrong, it was challenging, and I was in love with the colors. The Dreamcatcher, however, took about two weeks because I became devastatingly bored with the repetitive shapes. I have yet to recreate a window for that very reason, and also because I want each new endeavor I start to be more difficult than the last so I can improve.

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:iconbigblued:
bigblued : The small suncatchers (3-5 pieces) are about the size of my hand and the large suncatchers (6-12 pieces) are a little larger than the size of a piece of paper. After the initial sketch, it can take 2-12 hours on the computer to generate the vector file. This isn’t related to complexity, I’ll just keep fiddling with it until I feel it’s right.
Once the pattern is ready, I’ve timed my pace at about 6 parts per hour. So, a 3-piece suncatcher should take about half an hour to make. Soldering is the fastest step, foiling is the slowest, and the most boring. I have the most fun when I’m cutting the glass.

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Maria by jostrartat Perky Fairy Suncatcher by bigblued :thumb93533556: Butterfly by ioglass 'Monet's' Waterlilies by AigneadhAigeann
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Where do you work and where do you get your materials?
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:iconjjosryo:
jjosryo : I work out of my studio out in the garage of my grandmother's house, where I live. I got my supplies mainly from the University that I attended, and am unsure as to wether I will be able to continue that. I also get supplies from a shop called Common Crafts in Troy, NH. If she doesn't have what I need, the next closest shop is Twin City Stained Glass in Fitchburg, MA, and Renaissance Stained Glass in Nashua, NH. I've also taken to ordering off of Delphiglass.com, and I highly recommend that site. Their selection of just about everything for glass is pretty amazing- and it's a retailer, so you don't have to buy in bulk. :)
I work with pretty plain tools- self oiling cutter, grozers and runners, Glastar All Star Grinder (NO saws). That grinder is pretty amazing. I've had it for more than two years now and haven't even had to adjust the grinding head yet.

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:iconbigblued:
bigblued : I’ve basically taken over our kitchen. The glass is stored on shelves I built to fit under our kitchen table, half of our counter is set up with the cutting grid and the other half has the grinder, and I do all of my soldering on the stove. Food contamination isn’t really an issue because we almost never cook.
Living near Chicago, I am very fortunate that there are lots of places to get supplies.
My primary source is the shop where I took the classes, The Stained Glass Emporium. She has a phenomenal selection of glass and her store is less than a mile from our house. But she has some of the highest prices I’ve seen in the area. I go to her when I am looking for something exotic, or when I need a specific kind of glass, because I know she will have it. I also enjoy the chance to chat with my instructor, Susan, if she happens to be in.
My second source is a place I go past on my commute to work, Fredrick Stained Glass. He has about a quarter of the selection than the Emporium has, but his prices are about a third less. I will go to him when I’m not looking for something specific, but still kind of unusual. But the real reason I go to him is that he has been doing stained glass for decades and I always learn something when I stop in to talk with him. He has all sorts of wonderful stories, and you tell he really loves what he does. His enthusiasm is infectious and you walk out all excited about your next project.
My third place is Hobby Lobby. They have a very small selection of glass, but it covers all the basics and the prices are the lowest I’ve seen anywhere. I buy a lot of clear textured glass from them. If you are on their email list, they send a 40% off coupon once in a while. I use it for buying solder, which is one of the most expensive materials in stained glass.
And finally, I buy all of my tools online. I learned the hard way that cheap tools don’t work as well as the good tools. But good tools can be expensive. The internet allows me to shop around for the lowest prices on the good tools.

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:iconaigneadhaigeann:
AigneadhAigeann : As of right now I only work in the Stained Glass studio at my school; there's a decent selection of glass available for students to buy, and the basic tools come in an initial kit as part of the course fee. The studio has basically anything you could need to pump out a window, and if it doesn't have what you *want*, there's a small store called Common Crafts in nearby Jaffrey, NH that has a pretty stellar selection of glass, globs, bevels, and what-have-you. Plus, the shopkeep is adorable and gives a student discount.

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:iconioglass:
ioglass : Right now we have our own little studio, where we have all we need to create stained glass, to paint pictures and to craft things (we have a photo in our scrapbook if you’re interested). The only thing we haven’t got there is our own kiln, and someday it’d be nice to have one. As for buying materials, Tallinn is a small city so there’s only a couple of shops that all local artists surely know about.

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:iconjostrartat:
jostrartat : About 15 years ago I spen more time in the rock concert world and events, making and building stages all over Europe and Australia for the great ones in the world. And being a lot on tour I did not have the time to work with art. I found a way to create other things working with computers at that time. Creation still never ends.
These days I quit touring and am getting more time for real art and playing with glass again for sure.

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Small castle 7 by ioglass :thumb100209725: Kristen's Flower by AigneadhAigeann Ode to Mucha by jostrartat Stained Glass Battle Axe by bigblued
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Do you have any tips for beginners?
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:iconioglass:
ioglass : Go to a masterclass. Get yourself a grinding machine and a soldering iron, doodle something simple, get your children and pets out of the room and get started. Never do grinding without protective glasses (and rubber gloves would be useful, too). Draw your own sketches, you don’t need super drawing skills for that, but it would be much more interesting than any schemes you’ve downloaded from the Internet. Study the work of others, but don’t steal their designs. If your solder doesn't run smooth, apply more flux and try again. Don’t be afraid to experiment with shapes and materials, you’ll have fun even if you don’t succeed. Use glass that inspires you. When doing jewelry, use a lead free solder. Keep band-aids in reach.

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:iconaigneadhaigeann:
AigneadhAigeann : The best pieces are going to be the ones you're truly excited about. Commissions are all well and good for making the moneys, but the best work will come out of designs that are inspired by something that relates to you on a personal level. When starting out, you want to ease into the medium; my first professor had me do purely geometric for my first window, simply to get the techniques learned before I moved on to something with curvatures and detail, and I found that starting with straight lines to learn cutting and the foundations of the medium made it very easy to improve and move on to more challenging designs. Just keep in mind, too, that it's a very slow medium, and there is literally nothing you can mess up on that you can't undo; even if it's all soldered together, there are still ways to fix things that went wrong; so, in that regard, try to work through any discouragement.

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:iconjostrartat:
jostrartat : For starters: Don't be afraid to try: experiment and you find a way. I like to work with real antique glass I still can find in Europe. For painting on glass like the old tradition it will be hard to find those oxidation powders and isn't cheap. Or you can make them yourself or experiment with ceramic painting powder, the transparent ones. With those powders you need a kiln that goes to 1200°C. But even without painting you can make the most beautiful windows. Learn to play with the light and colours, that is the essential for glass.

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:iconjjosryo:
jjosryo : For beginners I'd recommend starting small... maybe an 8x10 piece with nothing but geometric pieces- one or two curves if you like or a circle if you're really adventurous. Don't worry about the first piece looking horrible, it's just to get yourself used to all of the steps involved.
Materials: cutter, grozer, runner (optional), xacto blade, at least 3 diff. sizes of foil, scissors, a board to work on, grinder, soldering iron and rheostat, fid (burnisher for foil), permanent marker (lumocolor) and glass cleaner.
Six tips:
1. I've learned that when you have pieces that come to a small tip (like triangles), if you use two sets of pliers, one on each side of the score line as close as you can get- it usually saves the tip from breaking off.
2. using the fid to gradually burnish down the foil in curves saves the foil from cracking, and therefore saves you the trouble of patching.
3. keeping your finger or thumb directly behind the part of the glass that is touching the grinding head will keep it from breaking and slipping (especially important with thin pieces).
4. if your solder isn't flowing the way you want it to, more flux!
5. Whatever you do, DO NOT paint your nails and expect them to look awesome after you're done doing stained glass.
6. You're going to cut yourself (maybe not badly) AT LEAST ONCE. It is glass, so just be careful! I cut through my nail during my first piece, so pay attention to what you're doing.
As for lessons, look into shops or specific artisans that you admire that may give lessons... but a school that specifically will teach the glass is highly recommended. I learned at Franklin Pierce University in Rindge, NH.

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:iconbigblued:
bigblued : First tip, take a class. The startup costs for equipment and supplies can be expensive. If you take a class, you will have a better idea if you love it or hate it, before you spend a lot of money on tools and supplies. Your local stained glass shop should have classes, or try your local community college.
Second tip, read the internet. There are loads of web sites full of instructions and tips. For any questions you have about stained glass, there are many people have already written an answer. I have one caveat though - There are purists in the field of stained glass, people who will think nothing of being mean and insulting if you don’t use the exact techniques they use. Ignore them. Play with different techniques and use what works for you.
Third tip, Practice and experiment. Your first piece will not be perfect. Nor your second, third, or fourth. But each one will get better. Try different heat settings, different foil thicknesses, different cutting pressures. Keep trying until you figure out what works best for you. When you reach that point, look back at your first pieces. You will be amazed at the difference!
Last tip, show your work. Show every piece, good or bad. Show your friends, family, and post online. There is no bigger motivator than the enthusiastic support of friends.

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Glory Be by AigneadhAigeann Stained Glass Triquetra by bigblued Winter by jostrartat :thumb138361440: The mean cat by ioglass
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Which glass work are you most proud of and why?
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:iconaigneadhaigeann:
AigneadhAigeann : It's probably a toss-up between the Skydog Diptych and the Bailitheoir Biotaille
Skydog Diptych by AigneadhAigeann The Bailitheoir Biotaille by AigneadhAigeann
The Diptych was my second project ever (first to be posted because the first one was frankly an abomination), and was inspired by two of the most loving and kind-hearted little muses I have ever had; I wanted to preserve the memory of my dear late dogs and I still find pride in its execution. The Bailitheoir Biotaille, however, is a pretty tight representation of my capabilities to this point, and I'm pretty damn proud of them, considering; it's basically the ripest fruit of my labors thus far because of all the animosity against it, but I made it happen despite all my teachers telling me I was retarded, and that gives me hope and confidence that maybe I can do this with my life; that's certainly the goal.

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:iconbigblued:
bigblued : Shortly after we took our first class, we found out that our teacher was leaving. Her husband had taken a job in another state and we would only have 3 weeks left to learn everything we could from her.
I decided that I wanted to learn how to use lead came. And, because time was short, I needed to design the piece to be quick to make. But it also needed to be as complex as possible because this was going to be my last chance to ask her questions.
The design I came up with was my Charles Rennie Mackintosh inspired piece, CRM Roses Stained Glass:
CRM Roses Stained Glass by bigblued
Extreme curves? Check. Insanely tight angles? Check. Bizarre intersections? Check.
There was nothing simple about this piece. It was hard to make, on purpose. But I loved every minute of it, and I learned a ton of new skills. I am very proud of how it came out, and it hangs in a window next to my computer monitor so I can look at it every day.

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:iconjjosryo:
jjosryo : The piece that I am STILL most proud of is this:
:thumb85599866:
That was my third piece ever, my final project for my first semester of stained glass. It was the first piece I ever painted in. It was a challenge for me because I went from under 20, to 88 to over 200 pieces in my first three panels. I made some pretty tiny pieces for myself, and spent a lot of time grinding my nails and generally just having a hard time holding on to the pieces. It's a libra, for me :)

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:iconjostrartat:
jostrartat :
Modern X by jostrartat
This is my personal work of art. It was fit in my atelier for publicity reasons. It shows a piece of paper with two brush strikes in green and across it all the red cross, meaning: You must be here for art-crafts. :) This is one of the floating windows I've made, on a surface about 2m high and 3m large.
This window was moved to another glass atelier and then again to another where I lost its tracks.
Reflectif object by jostrartat
The Reflective object is my second favorite one, an open piece of work with mirrors and antique glass. (About 1m20 high). This one also been moved a few times.


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:iconioglass:
ioglass : We are always fond of our most recent work. Right now it has to be two pieces with blue flowers:
Blue - the first one by ioglass and Blue- the second by ioglass
We’ve never done hexagons before, so it was challenging enough. The flowers are cut from opaque glass, but the whole background is colorless and transparent, so it was quite difficult to make them work together. The clients have told us that they didn’t have any special preferences, so we looked around and got the idea from lampshades in that same room – they were white with blue flowers and black leaves and we created ours to resemble that ornament. It also makes a lovely contrast with reddish-brown walls in that room and with dark brown furniture. The transparent background was chosen for two reasons: the room itself is dark and we didn’t want to make it any darker, and those two windows are next to the front door, so it’s nice to see who’s creeping across your lawn. The clients asked for those pieces to look good from the outside, too, hence the opaque glass. Personally, we like the result: it’s simple yet impressive and it compliments the room rather than suppresses it (and the clients were happy too).

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:thumb144599976: 50 pendants by ioglass The Teanga Fior by AigneadhAigeann Stained Glass Cthulhu by bigblued Mucha alike by jostrartat
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Thank you so much for taking the time to participate in this special feature! I hope you go on creating amazing glass work for all of us to enjoy. :)

Cheers,
MyntKat
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:iconjostrartat:
jostrartat Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2010   General Artist
Great job you did to explain in short ,what's all about possibilities you can do with glass in a creative way. Putting some artists together and let them tell about their work. To show others: This is an never ending story playing with magical coloured and textured glass. Thanks for this featured to show others the way to some artists who can use a "little push" in the back with their creations..
Again :Thanks a lot.. ;)
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:iconmyntkat:
MyntKat Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2010  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Nonono, thank YOU! :hug:
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:iconalexluna:
alexluna Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2010  Student Interface Designer
Amazing artists! So glad they were featured. I :heart: Glass Week!
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:iconphoenixleo:
phoenixleo Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2010
I love these, and want to do these way, but since I was little and wasn't allowed to, I got the liquid based glass paint for working on glasses to get the stained glass effect :P
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August 19, 2010
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