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PRR superpower: final by mrbill6ishere PRR superpower: final by mrbill6ishere

These are all my final ideas for PRR superpower steam engines. Plus a J1 with a belpaire firebox. These would be created by the fictional Milanese mechanic Augusto Lombardi.

The R3
Wheel arrangement: 4-8-4 
Service: Express Passenger
Number built: 350
Number preserved: at least 7, though more a rumored to still exist
Years of production: 1933-1940
When the NYC introduced their Hudson, the PRR first attempted a K5, though that engine proved to not be much better than the K4. After that, they decided to go bigger then the NYC did with the Hudson, and designed these 4-8-4s. While most 8 coupled steam engines on the PRR were put to work on freight, the R3s were used as the true successor to the K4 Pacific. This class had a staggering 300 examples built in the years from 1933 until 1940, after which the US entered WW2 in 1941. Becoming the largest amount of any PRR passenger engine engine other than the K4 Pacifics. These 4-8-4s, known as "Keystones," were the ultimate PRR engine. They were powerful, fast, cheap to build, and easy to upgrade and experiment upon, essentially making them to American railroads the Black 5 was to British railroads. As said, they mainly worked as the long sought successor to the K4. Pulling the fastest trains in the PRR passenger fleet, though come the T1, they continued to prove their worth on fast freight, working with the M1 and I1s. They soon went on the inspire the J class 4-8-4s, the most prized engine of PRR subsidiary Norfolk and Western. Other technologically significant steam engines it went on to inspire were the 4-8-4s of Andre Chapelon, and most significantly, the South African Railways 25NC. 

The M2
Wheel arrangement: 2-8-4 
Service: Freight
Number built: 36
Number preserved: Two
Years of production: 1928-1930
The first 2-8-4 steam engines. These were built in the 1930s when the PRR wanted a larger engine than their L1 Mikados to haul heavier trains. Lombardi's response was to take blueprints for the I1 decapod, take away a driver and replace it with a 4-wheel trailing truck, then us the newfound space to put in a larger firebox. Then the air reservoir of the L1 mikado and the pilot of the M1 mountain were placed on the front. The result was a strong, reliable fright ngine that could put its fellow freight engines, and those of other railroads, to shame easily. They were mainly referred to as "Rhinos", similar to how the I1s before were called "Hippos."

The M3 
Wheel arrangement: 2-8-4 
Service: Express Freight
Number built: 150
Number preserved: at least two, though more a rumored to sill exist
Years of production: 1935-1939
The second 2-8-4 steam engines. Lombardi was inspired by the 2-8-4s built by Lima for the railroads own by the Van Sweringen Brothers, such as the Nickel Plate, Erie, and C&O. Lombardi worked with both Lima and Baldwin in 1938 to develop some 2-8-4s built to PRR design. The first of these engines, number 7350, rolled out November 1939, just in time to help with US aid to Britain during the war. They soon proved themselves capable of high speeds and extreme power for the railroad. As a result, these 2-8-4s, christened "Juniatas." Have lasted well into the early 1970s. Just like virtually every PRR steam engine really.

The R2
Wheel arrangement: 4-8-4 
Service: Freight
Number built: 40
Number preserved: Three
Years of production: 1929-1934
Much like the M2, this engine was a heavily modified version of a pre-existing PRR engine. This time, the M1 Mountain type was given a four wheel truck. Then it was given a larger firebox. The end result was the perfect PRR dual service engine. Though only a few were built in comparison to other PRR classes, as the M1 and I1 were considered fairly sufficient. They nonetheless stayed long enough to be called the "Super Mountains." These engines mainly co-existed with the M1, which gave them the aforementioned nickname.

Lastly, we have the J1. Except in this rewritten history they had a belpaire firebox after the war.

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:iconrlkitterman:
rlkitterman Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2018  Hobbyist Photographer
Interesting concepts!  Thanks for sharing them here.
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:iconmrbill6ishere:
mrbill6ishere Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2018  Student General Artist
Glad you do. Which ones do you like best.
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:iconrlkitterman:
rlkitterman Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2018  Hobbyist Photographer
I really like the cab windows and red cab roof on Nos. 7402 and 6150 -- not something I normally see on steam locomotives!
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:iconmrbill6ishere:
mrbill6ishere Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2018  Student General Artist
What about 7236? The one at top?
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:iconrlkitterman:
rlkitterman Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2018  Hobbyist Photographer
It looks great too!  But it was the red cab roofs that caught my eye first.
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:iconuglygosling:
uglygosling Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2018
We can only imagine as you did what might have happened if the PRR had gone for 'super power' steam, especially for long-distance passenger power.
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:iconmrbill6ishere:
mrbill6ishere Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2018  Student General Artist
Do you think my ideas are close?
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:iconuglygosling:
uglygosling Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2018
I would say yes, it does look like you have done your research. :)
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:iconmrbill6ishere:
mrbill6ishere Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2018  Student General Artist
I will tell you Lombardi is a fictional person. But that said, I did try to think of realistic ways fro how the PRR may have decided to make them, especially in the case of the R3.
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