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Hashemite Arabia by moerby08 Hashemite Arabia by moerby08
Again a map in a style borrowed from the The Economist. After the Arab Revolt during the Great War, Hussein ibn Ali al-Hashimi (Ħussein ibn Âlī el-Hāchemī), the Shariff of Mecca and Emir of the Hejaz (Ħejāz) seized power from the Ottomans and allied his kingdom with the British. By the end of the war, his troops liberate most of the Arab lands under Ottoman rule. Although the victorious British and French oppose the establishment of a unified Arab kingdom under Hashemite rule, they allow the establishment of two Arab monarchies – the Kingdom of Syria (el-Mamlaka es-Sourīya) and the Kingdom of Mesopotamia (el-Mamlaka el-Îrāqiya) – under Hashemite rule. Hussein, as ruler of the Kingdom of Hejaz (Mamlaket el-Ħejāz) installs his sons, Faisal (Faiçal ibn Ħussein) and Abdallah (Âbdallah ibn Ħussein) as kings of Syria and of Mesopotamia, respectively. The British and French agree to allow the three Hashemite Arab kingdoms to form 'an ever closer union' upon the death of King Hussein. Although some the forming union is not including all the Arab lands – Yemen, the Najd remains under the rule of an obscure Wahhabi dynasty, the Sâouds, while the British rule over Egypt and the south-eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula, the Hashemite kingdoms entered an era of modernisation and prosperity. A good marker of this is the efforts to romanise the Arabic language (an alphabet used on this map), that became a co-offical script next to the traditional Arabic alphabet. 

The cost of this tacit Allied agreement to allow the gradual establishment of a unified Arab kingdom over the heartland of the Middle East was the transfer of direct control of the Holy Land to them. France took control of the mostly Christian-populated Mount Lebanon making it part of metropolitan France as the département du Mont Liban ruled directly from Paris. Contrary to the initial plans of the Lebanese Maronite elites to create a 'Grand Liban' through the inclusion of Muslim populated territories including the area of Tripoli in the north or that of Tyre in the south, the French decide for a Christian-majority territory of the original Mount Lebanon including the area around the village of Maaloula, where Aramaic is still spoken.   

The British install themselves in Palestine, with borders including the area of Tyre in the north but excluding the el-Naqab (or Negev) desert. However, due to international pressure, the Jerusalem area, including Bethlehem as well as a corridor to Jaffa, come under international rule as a 'Corpus Separatum'. The decision seeks to appease the Arabs who had been opposing the incorporation of Jerusalem into the British Empire by all means. Nevertheless, British Palestine remains to be open to Jewish immigration, however through strict quotas in order to maintain sectarian balance. 

In Anatolia, the bitter defeat of the Ottoman Empire on all fronts led to the emergence of a number of new nations - Armenia, Kurdistan and Greek Pontos -, the establishment of an International Zone around Constantinople and the Straits as well as the annexation of Thrace in Europe and Ionia in Asia Minor by Greece. Turkey, reduced to the Anatolian Highlands is kept in check by a Christian-Kurdish alliance formed by Greece, the Pontos, Armenia, and Kurdistan. As a result of Greco-Turkish and Armeno-Turkish population transfers Turkey became an ethnically and religiously homogenous, inward-looking caliphate ruled from the conservative capital of Konya.  
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:iconsarps:
SarpS Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Haşmetli Arabistan
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:iconardolon:
Ardolon Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2018  Student Artist
Well done
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:iconptwolv022:
ptwolv022 Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2018
>Turkish Antalya
*Angry Italian noises*
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:iconoccidentale:
occidentale Featured By Owner Sep 13, 2018
Meh.
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:iconseacambrian:
SeaCambrian Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2018
Fascinating and great work.
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:iconchipmunken:
CHIPMUNKEN Featured By Owner Jun 25, 2018
Wow, this actually looks like it could be from the Economist.  Great work here!
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:iconmoerby08:
moerby08 Featured By Owner Jul 2, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks! That was precisely the goal - I love the concise style used for their maps. 
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:iconieph:
IEPH Featured By Owner Jun 21, 2018
What fonts did you actually use btw?
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:iconbruiser128:
bruiser128 Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2018  Student Traditional Artist
How will the International Zone develop?
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:iconmoerby08:
moerby08 Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
What do you mean how?
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:iconbruiser128:
bruiser128 Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2018  Student Traditional Artist
I meant how does Constantinople and Straits Develop under the League of Nations?
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:iconmoerby08:
moerby08 Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'd say the best historical example is the Free City of Danzig that existed between 1920 and 1939. It was ruled by a High Commissioner appointed by the League of Nations and governed by a local Senate elected by the country's Parliament. The city-state functioned as a semi-independent state with parties and governmental structures while Poland acquired extensive rights (such as using the port, a customs union, and international diplomatic representation of Danzig by the Polish State). 
In the case of Constantinople and the Straits I could envision a similar arrangement with concessions given to the Turkish, the Greek, the Pontic, and the Armenian states in the fields of economics and customs. The zone would be populous and geopolitically important enough to maintain international diplomatic representation on its own. The security of the country would be guaranteed by the deployment of multinational forces (either set up from the missions of the Allied victors of the Great War or from neutral nations of the League of Nations such as Brazil, but surely excluding Greek, Turkish, and Armenian forces). 

The internationalisation of the area could have the goal of either establishing an independent, multinational state serving as a buffer zone between Greece and Turkey or to prepare the region to be integrated into either Greece or Turkey or be partitioned between the two.  
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:iconbruiser128:
bruiser128 Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2018  Student Traditional Artist
Combined with it's geographic position, it could once again become 
a major trading and banking center in the world. I am thinking 
something similar to Singapore
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:iconmoerby08:
moerby08 Featured By Owner Edited Apr 14, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It'd certainly become at least a transcontinental hub between Asia and Europe - as it has always been the case - and most certainly it'd also serve as the main commercial outlet used by Pontos, Armenia, and even Kurdistan. 

Also, I would imagine the French envisioning a similar role for Beirut and their Lebanese enclave linking the emerging Arab lands with Europe. Beirut was indeed a major banking and trading centre up until the Lebanese civil war. Now imagine a Hong-Kong or Macau-like political environment vis-à-vis the Arab lands, competition from ports in British Palestine, Egypt, and Constantinople, all of which would benefit the emergence of Beirut as what is today Dubai.   
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:iconbruiser128:
bruiser128 Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2018  Student Traditional Artist
Not to mention home to a LOT of political intrigue from Greek and Turkish Revanchist, 
with East and West intrigues when the Cold War starts up. Heck in this setup, we may 
see Greece join the Axis Powers if it means obtaining the Straits.
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:iconmoerby08:
moerby08 Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Oh yes, Constantinople would remain a major hub for international espionage. I could imagine that after the consolidation of the area as an independent state, the League of Nations or the UN would move some of it's main offices or regional HQs to the city. Also, it is very likely that Russia (whoever maybe ruling her) would not give up the intention of controlling the Straits. 

About a WW2 scenario... I am optimistic enough to assume that Turkey was the only nation with a punitive peace treaty after the Great War; the Arab got their countries, Austria-Hungary survived in a way, Germany got a fair treaty through which WW2 became avoidable ;)  
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(1 Reply)
:iconcervuselaphus:
cervuselaphus Featured By Owner Mar 9, 2018
Wow, really beautiful! And maybe it would work better then OTL version...

(but where is Assyria!!!?? :D)
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:iconquantumbranching:
QuantumBranching Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2018
Excellent! Although I must say Turkey is screwed like it's Thanksgiving. 
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:iconmoerby08:
moerby08 Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Oh yes, Turkey did not come out too well from this rearrangement. On the other hand, it is almost completely homogenous in terms of ethnicity/religion, assuming that both the Armenian Genocide and the population exchanges between Turkey and Greece/Pontos did take place; and that there's been more informal Kurdish-Turkish and Turkish-Arab population exchanges between the respective states. Also, the remainder of Turkey remains free of foreign occupation and demilitarization and will have no choice but to start cooperating with her neighbours.   
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:iconromanbozorov:
RomanBozorov Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2017
Byzantine Empire / Eastern Roman Empire State Sign by RomanBozorov  
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:iconromanbozorov:
RomanBozorov Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2017
Countries of Europe by RomanBozorov  
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:iconbreakingerr:
Breakingerr Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Why Armenia own Batumi?
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:iconmoerby08:
moerby08 Featured By Owner Nov 6, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Batumi had a mixed population around the turn of the century with Armenians making up the largest of the city's ethnic groups (around a quarter). Georgians only became majority after the 60's. So, a relative ethnic majority and Armenian's need for a port city in order to maintain communications and trade independently seemed to be a good enough case to include Batumi into Armenia. 
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:icontaokhi:
Taokhi Featured By Owner Dec 14, 2017
Every Georgian city back in Russian Empire had armenian majority population, even Tbilisi, by that logic you can give whole Georgia to them
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:iconmoerby08:
moerby08 Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
True, the idea here was though to supply the Armenian state with a trading port, and thus, access to the Black Sea. In this case, Batumi's ethnic composition certainly serves as a great justification for this end. 
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:iconkosmas-j:
kosmas-j Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2018
*Fury of Stalin*
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:iconiasonkeltenkreuzler:
IasonKeltenkreuzler Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2017  Hobbyist Artist
wow this looks heavy nice :) thumbs up :)
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:iconzalezsky:
zalezsky Featured By Owner Sep 26, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
fantastic and beautiful!
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:iconmoerby08:
moerby08 Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks :) I've noticed there were not many maps about alternate Middle East scenarios on here 
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