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Diamantinasaurus and Australovenator

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By MicrocosmicEcology   |   Watch
Published: December 13, 2013
© 2013 - 2020 MicrocosmicEcology
Winton Formation megafauna, from the Early Cretaceous of Australia: The titanosaur Diamantinasaurus matildae and theropod Australovenator wintonensis.

You can read more about these animals at:
www.plosone.org/article/info%3…



Please do not use or reproduce without permission.
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Comments28
anonymous's avatar
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Tankostro's avatar
I came aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
Phillip2001's avatar
Phillip2001Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Very good , but Australovenator should be taller.
MicrocosmicEcology's avatar
MicrocosmicEcologyHobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks! Based on the original paper, I think if anything the Australovenator should be even smaller compared to Diamantinasaurus - check out the scale bars:

journals.plos.org/plosone/arti…

My image contains a lot of anatomical inaccuracies that should probably be addressed in an edit at some point, though.
Phillip2001's avatar
Phillip2001Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Ok, what year is the paper?
MicrocosmicEcology's avatar
MicrocosmicEcologyHobbyist Digital Artist
2009.
Phillip2001's avatar
Phillip2001Hobbyist Traditional Artist
OK , i see
Diamantinasaurus was visibly larger than Australovenator.
Mental-AutopsyComics's avatar
Mental-AutopsyComicsStudent Filmographer
Nice!
MicrocosmicEcology's avatar
MicrocosmicEcologyHobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks!
GraviousGaruda00's avatar
GraviousGaruda00Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Nice picture but australeovenator was a ceolorosaurid/basal tyrannosaurid and not a allosaurid.
MicrocosmicEcology's avatar
MicrocosmicEcologyHobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks. Do you have a source for that? When I made this, everything I read said it was classified within the Allosauroidea.
GraviousGaruda00's avatar
GraviousGaruda00Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Here is a link to a page that explains it their are many others that explained it better but this is the first one to pop up. manasataramgini.wordpress.com/… these finds are based on more recent finds that include a juvenile skull and the fact that they were considered to be ceolorosaurs because of their tails and it's vertebrae but the skull finding was the piece they needed to confirm this grouping. 
MicrocosmicEcology's avatar
MicrocosmicEcologyHobbyist Digital Artist
Interesting - thanks!
GraviousGaruda00's avatar
GraviousGaruda00Hobbyist Traditional Artist
No problem!
MasterofGaburincho's avatar
MasterofGaburinchoHobbyist Artist
Wonderful job! A picture like this would give pure nostalgia when us children read some dinosaur books or would have a good time visiting the meuseum. Wonderful, I say, just wonderful!
MicrocosmicEcology's avatar
MicrocosmicEcologyHobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you!
UtahRaptor14's avatar
Excuse me I was wondering if I coild use this work for a topic I'm writing for Speculative Evolution. It consists of only Australian dinosaurs, and of course credit will be given to you. I also will understand if you deny. Thanks!
SameerPrehistorica's avatar
SameerPrehistoricaProfessional Digital Artist
Nicely done
MicrocosmicEcology's avatar
MicrocosmicEcologyHobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you!
Troyodon's avatar
TroyodonHobbyist Traditional Artist
Anyone ever think that that Diamantinasaurus's legs are too fat?
MicrocosmicEcology's avatar
MicrocosmicEcologyHobbyist Digital Artist
Probably.
JoakinMar's avatar
Wow!! Amazing picture, it's a fantastic view betwenn this two animals. I think Australovenator has decided to not attack the titanosaur ang go to hunt a more easy prey!!!
MicrocosmicEcology's avatar
MicrocosmicEcologyHobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks! Yeah, there's probably something a little less challenging to go after...
dinobenten's avatar
That theropod is wise to keep a distance.
anonymous's avatar
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