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Ashdown Maniraptoran by MattMart Ashdown Maniraptoran by MattMart
Newly described by Darren Naish and Steve Sweetman, this is a *highly speculative* restoration of the so-called Ashdown maniraptoran. One of the smallest non-avialan dinosaurs known (if it is indeed non-avialan), it's known from a single, tiny but adult vertebra.

Read more here: [link]

I essentially restored this as a very small protarchaeopterygid-grade animal, hence the tightly-folding wing feathers, (oviraptorids could fold their wings more tightly than even many early birds) with some influence from scansoripterygids given its small size (and as a slight nod to GSP's interpretation of Epidexipteryx hui as a basal oviraptorosaur). The legs are quite long compared to the body and the foot is large, to better emphasize the diminutive size and, I reckon, to escape hungry mammals.
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:iconosmatar:
Osmatar Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2012  Professional General Artist
I love it how the addition of plumage not only makes this little critter look like it was a real contemporary animal painted from life - or a stuffed specimen - but also completely obscures the stereotypically dinosaurian anatomy underneath. (I've seen a fairly creepy lanky version of this guy.) This is truly the new dinosaur revolution that will forever change not only how we look at theropod dinosaurs, including birds.
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:icontoxickittycat:
ToxicKittyCat Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I saw that picture in 'METRO' Newspapaer and I was like OMG new dinosaur discovered
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:iconbabbletrish:
babbletrish Featured By Owner May 28, 2011  Professional Traditional Artist
God, that's cute!
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:iconalbertonykus:
Albertonykus Featured By Owner May 26, 2011
Interesting to see you restoring something not known from good fossils!
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:iconpilsator:
pilsator Featured By Owner May 26, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Uhm ... is the retroverted hallux a concession to the scansoriopterygid option (if their halluces were truly retroverted)?
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:iconmattmart:
MattMart Featured By Owner May 27, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Fixed it! I've been drawing so many avialans lately I reckon I just threw in a reversed hallux via force of habit :X
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:iconmattmart:
MattMart Featured By Owner May 27, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well, it's supposed to be projecting laterally but now i'm thinking that's probably even too far for this critter.
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:iconpilsator:
pilsator Featured By Owner May 26, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Awesome painting, and nice work summing up your rationale behind it. Pretty much what I assume a very basal oviraptorosaur (or some other basal nonparavian maniraptor) would look like.
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner May 25, 2011  Professional General Artist
Really nice work making the coloration and pattern look convincingly birdlike without (to my knowledge, anyway) actually copying a specific bird. I'm surprised as no fuzzy fingers, though. As per your Microraptor advice I've been giving most of my maniraptorans fuzzy fingers, even the larger ones like Utahraptor.
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:iconmattmart:
MattMart Featured By Owner May 25, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks! As for fuzzy fingers, that's the way I'd go for deinonychosaurs certainly. As I mentioned Microraptor seems to even have sort of an alula. But Caudipteryx has naked fingers near the tip, and since this is a supposed oviraptorosaur I thought I'd leave that little link in.

(Confuciusornis also seems to have a naked digit 1, oddly).
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner May 25, 2011  Professional General Artist
That makes sense, then.
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:iconthemorlock:
TheMorlock Featured By Owner May 25, 2011  Student General Artist
Cool
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May 25, 2011
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